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Thread: Mortise marking suggestions.

  1. #31
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    I’m with Steven on the need to see. Fine grained wood like cherry and maple makes life easy whether I use a Tite-Mark or a cutter.

    When working with White Oak, I’ve taken to using blue or yellow painters tape and cutting though that. It’s easy to see and I don’t rely on the gauge being able to cut that hard oak. I’ve been duped by grain lines a few times too.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  2. #32
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    Fine grained wood like cherry and maple makes life easy whether I use a Tite-Mark or a cutter.
    When my aged eyes are having a problem, a very sharp pencil is used to ride in scored lines to enhance visibility.

    Though the old wisdom is if something is working for you, why change it?

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #33
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    Using painters tape and marking inside a score line is much different than working to just a pencil line. I will often use the blue tape method especially when cutting dovetails in dark woods....Thanks Pekovich and Derek Cohen! I almost always take a .3mm mechanical pencil and mark inside all my gauge lines. If I had to work to just a standard pencil line it would look like my joinery was cut with a hammer.

  4. #34
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    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    Sigh....

    Some days it is nice to understand WHAT someone is talking about? Other days, some just continue on without bothering....just cherry picking bits and pieces out of someone's statements, until it fits what one does want to here.....

    A Chopping Day, 9 done .JPG
    Need 14 mortises on this board..then..when you are done..I have a second board to do 14 more mortises, that have to line up with the first 14...
    Bench Frames, 2 frames made .JPG
    BTW, did I mention that you'll need to chop the mortises for these frames, too...
    Friday Evening photos, test fitting .JPG
    Dry fit as you go..
    Glue-up Weds., front view .JPG
    That's ok, just pile the slats for the seat any old place, while the glue cures..

    HOW one marks THEIR layout lines is entirely up to each worker, based on how they were trained, and what tools they are used to using.

    Me? Right now I am "under the weather" , feeling a bit of the GRUMPY side...but, IF one feels they NEED that fine of a point to mark layouts, or they can't do the work....so be it. My Boston and I will just have to carry on. Working with wood, and not metal working...there IS a difference....some just don't get it.

    Not being "snarky"...but, I can imagine what a Sheraton would say if you claimed his way of marking a Project's layouts looked like a Hack was using a hammer....LOL...

    Yes, I use that marking gauge..have about 1/2 a dozen, actually...and almost always have to trace the marks they leave, just to be able to see them
    Double Marking gauge, 3 pins .JPG
    Pins, never wheels...
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  5. #35
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    Not being "snarky"...but, I can imagine what a Sheraton would say if you claimed his way of marking a Project's layouts looked like a Hack was using a hammer....LOL...
    If you read my posts I said nothing about your work looking like it was cut with a hammer. My post clearly says that if I used a standard pencil line for my layout it would look like MY joinery was cut with a hammer.

  6. All you need is enough of a mark to see to register the chisel correctly. A pin gauge is fine. You don't need elaborate gauges with exquisitely honed knives, cute wheels, and all that rot. If you can fit in a couple of gauges that stay set to your most often used chisels, then so much the better.

    If the arrises will show as in through mortises in Arts and Crafts furniture, just use the cutting gauge you already own to crisp up the marks made with a pin gauge. A chisel tap works too. Otherwise, on orther mortises, the scratch from a pin is fine.

    A bloated kit of tools serves more to confuse than to edify.
    Last edited by Charles Edward; 12-09-2023 at 5:36 PM.

  7. #37
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    A bloated kit of tools serves more to confuse than to edify.
    Very confusing, with more than a half dozen smoothers it takes me at least two seconds to decide which to use. Fortunately it takes about three seconds to walk over to the shelf where they are kept.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. Owning shelves full duplicate bench planes is a modern-day phenomenon, except perhaps for the employer who needed to keep a staff working and producing with planes he knew would get the job done with no excuses.

    I've worked wood my whole life and I have no idea what I would do with two No. 4 planes, much less a half dozen or more.
    Last edited by Charles Edward; 12-09-2023 at 7:06 PM.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Edward View Post
    Owning shelves full duplicate bench planes is a modern-day phenomenon, except perhaps for the employer who needed to keep a staff working and producing with planes he knew would get the job done with no excuses.

    I've worked wood my whole life and I have no idea what I would do with two No. 4 planes, much less a half dozen or more.
    I didn't say there are a half dozen #4 planes in my shop. The #4 isn't the only plane that is considered as a smoother. Everything from a #1 up to and including a #5 can be used for smoothing. Some people even think of the #5-1/2 (or #6) as super smoothers.

    Surely some folks get by fine with two or three bench planes and maybe a block plane. Others like to have a variety. Then there are those of us who want a plane that is sized for the work.

    Smoothing Saw Marks.jpg

    The piece being worked is less than 1/4X1/4X3". Even a #3 smoother would be a bit big for it.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  10. #40
    Then, for precision and visibility, there's this...


    IMG_3762.jpeg

  11. #41
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    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    Been using this thing the last few days...
    Resaw works Friday, Marking gauge #77.JPG
    Mainly for the single pin....it does have the Mortise Pins, as well....
    Double Marking gauge, 3 pins .JPG
    I also have a dedicated Mortise Gauge, without the extra pin...same maker.
    Resaw works, Friday, tool kit.JPG
    Tool kit for today..
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

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