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Thread: How to make these

  1. #1
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    How to make these

    These were a little fussy to make using band saw, rasps and sandpaper. Now I want to make several and want to go a little faster and with more consistency. No access to CNC and I don't want to outsource it. Looks like a job for template routing, something I have not done.

    So I'm thinking to rough out on the band saw then route to a pattern.

    Router table?

    Pattern material?

    Bit that won't bite the end grain?

    The pattern can have a pin to locate the stock to it but then how to secure it?

    Toast Tongs 2.jpg

  2. #2
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    That looks pretty delicate for pattern routing. W/O a CNC I think I'd continue to make them as you did for the first one.

    John

  3. #3
    Looks a job for 3D printing.
    Assumption is the mother of all screw ups
    Anonyms

  4. #4
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    I think you could do it with pattern routing on a router table. A challenge will be cutting those long thin parts. They will want to bend into or away from the router bit. I'd be thinking about gluing the stock to a waste piece on the outside, which you later cut off. The saw blade cutting the waste away will be less likely to bend the slender part than the router bit.

  5. #5
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    Those are a clever bit of carving. That is going to be tough. My soon to become son in law found my workshop an irresistible place. He made a lot of things out there including toaster tongs. It was not always convenient for me to share my shop. He and our daughter moved away and we sure do miss them.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  6. #6
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    I'm thinking a 1/4" spiral upcutting bit might be best for this.

    Then the workpiece would be a sandwich

    Against the table the workpiece bandsawn within 1/16" of final dimensions. The workpiece will be purpleheart.

    Attached to this with hot melt glue, a spacer of hardwood. This is where the end of the cutting bit will live.

    Next will be a pattern of 1/8" thick aluminum hot melt glued to the spacer. It will have a pin to locate it to the workpiece.

    The pattern will have a wooden handle screwed to the top.

    I will separate the workpiece from the spacer by heating it on a hot surface.

    Three challenges, - blowout on the bottom - separating the workpiece after routing - other surprises

  7. #7
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    I think this may get violent if you try and template route this. I would recommend something else.
    A super fine bandsaw blade or a scroll saw may be the safest/fastest refine with sand paper.

  8. #8
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    Here are fixtures that work fairly well for putting a simple 12 foot radius on small parts. The part has to be bandsaw cut very close to the final shape. I like your idea to use a spiral bit. I do this on the router table with regular bits. It is easy to catch the end and split the wood or send the wood flying out of the fixture. I want a down-spiral bit for this in the future.

    IMG_1667.jpg IMG_1668.jpg
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 11-14-2023 at 9:14 AM.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  9. #9
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    Daisy Pin Router maybe?

    I never got mine setup over the Summer. Something I look forward to doing in the Spring.
    I bought it a year ago because it looked like a fun thing to have.
    CNC & Lasers have pretty much killed off pin routers & for good reason (if you're after speed and "soulless" function)
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  10. #10
    "if" both sides are the same,
    I think the common leg profile should be made in a batch, (one wide board) then cut off to width one leg at a time. You would get a consistent result with less tool setup.

  11. #11
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    If I were going to try to make pieces that small and delicate with a router, I'd make my pattern an oversized negative, and then route the pieces in solid, 3/8" or so overthick, stock, with the the bit not going all the way through the stock. Cut the backing off on a bandsaw after routing, and finish up the edges with a rasp or file.

  12. #12
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    Whiteside router bit ordered. $55. That smarts a bit. I will look at the spots where climb routing is required and leave those to hand work. The rest should work with the sandwich plan. Still have to test releasing the hot melt glue with heat.

    This workpiece is not so delicate relative to the amount of material to be removed if I saw it within 1/16". And purpleheart is not pine.

    Still, I may need to add a backer of something to control blowout on the router and on the band saw. Hardboard should work but then there's another layer of glue to release and clean up. I can start a little thick then sand to final thickness.

    These pieces are 3/8" thick x 7.5" long

  13. #13
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    CA glue might be a better choice than hot-melt glue. It will heat release nicely, and is quite a bit easier to work with as far as getting your sandwich flat with uniform glue coverage.

  14. #14
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    Hot melt glue can be released cleanly with denatured alcohol. Pour (or brush) a few drops on the glue joint, wait a minute and the bond releases. Repeat if not successful the first time. The glue will peel off perfectly.

  15. #15
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    Some testing is in order

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