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Thread: Cord AWG size for big routers

  1. #16
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    Cambridge Vermont
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    The national electrical code doesn't apply to cords on devices. An engineer that designed it is free to choose what size wire to use and how thick the insulation on the wire should be. It's why you'll find a wire gauge that would be too small by code on something like a router.

  2. #17
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    Alex, wouldn't UL and similar organizations in other countries have a say on approving the design? It's a bit hard to sell products that don't have those kinds of approvals.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Alex, wouldn't UL and similar organizations in other countries have a say on approving the design? It's a bit hard to sell products that don't have those kinds of approvals.
    Exactly my thoughts.
    A device, used properly, shouldn't fail due to electrical issues. It would not get UL certified if it did.

  4. #19
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    Dec 2006
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    Toronto Ontario
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    Where I live, 14AWG flexible cord with 2 current carrying conductors is rated at 18 amperes……Regards, Rod

  5. #20
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    Feb 2003
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    We're kind of over thinking this here.
    For an extension cord, it's really the length, as well as the awg, that you're looking at.Hopefully the OP already has what he needs.
    Under 25', a 16awg extension cord will run that router just fine. Longer than 25' and you would want to consider stepping up to 14awg.
    I would be willing to bet that the internal wiring, and provided cords, on the largest routers on the market is probably 16awg internally, and 14awg for the cord, at best.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  6. #21
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    UL certification is optional. They also test based on what the company specifies. For example if the company says it's router is designed for 15 minutes of continuous use with 45 minutes of rest that's how they assume it'll be used. UL doesn't try to find the breaking point. They do try to see if a item meets industry standards but that's not easy. For example routers from different manufacturers will have different ratings.

    The NEC are written assuming the worst case. Wiring size is based the temperature the wire will while carrying the maximum current going through the wires 100% of the time (ampacity).

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