Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 46

Thread: Milwaukee Cordless Track Saw

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    2,567

    Milwaukee Cordless Track Saw

    I recently saw an initial review for the Milwaukee cordless track saw on YouTube. The creator complained at the beginning of the video that Milwaukee had him, "Really pissed off". Turned out he was pissed because he was so endeared to his Makita corded track saw and, by golly, he had to admit the Milwaukee saw was better in multiple ways.

    I've never owned a track saw. I would like to pick one up for building shop cabinets. The Milwaukee track saw is expensive, but it appears to me any of the really good track saws are pretty expensive. If they're going to be expensive, I might was well get a really good example. (I'm not positive, but I think the Milwaukee track saw costs less than a Festool track saw.) The guy in the YouTube video I saw said he really wasn't impressed by the lower cost saws from Kreg, Grizzly or WEN, but that is just his take. (He did own all of those examples.)

    Would I be wasting money on a cordless track saw if it's just for my shop and I won't take it to job sites? The YouTube video compared the Milwaukee cordless saw to a corded Makita and I was surprised to see there was no difference in performance. (Recharging being the exception.)

    I have a Milwaukee cordless drill that absolutely runs circles around, spanks all over and sets fire to the DeWalt drill it replaced. I think the batteries are interchangeable? Not sure if that's a factor at all.

    I know folks here love to talk about power tools, so I'd really like to talk about the Milwaukee track saw. Your thoughts and opinions will help me to decide.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Pat Germain; 10-24-2023 at 6:50 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    64,706
    The new Milwaukee track saw is a very good tool. I do think that cordless is more helpful to the contractor out on sight than folks in a shop doing fine woodworking, largely because in the shop, we're going to want to use a dust extractor and that means there still will be a "tail". But if you already have the M18 battery setup, it's certainly a solid choice to compare against the Festool, Mafial and Makita track saws. (corded or cordless) I watched Kyle from RR Buildings discuss the Milwaukee pre-release and I was pretty impressed. It has a nice feature that it can "stick" to the track (requires the Milwaukee track for this feature) which adds the utility that Festool has with their construction type saws and only recently embraced on the latest "fine work" track saw. But the red tool is still completely compatible with Festool, Makia and Mafial tracks. If I was in the Milwaukee eco-system, I'd probably have that new saw in my arsenal already.

    I will mention that the Kreg saw that you brought up does have one feature that some folks might prefer and that's having the blade on the left instead of the right compared to the other track saws.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    2,567
    Thank you, Jim.

  4. #4
    I own a corded DeWalt track saw and use an Evolution track saw at church sometimes. I've never used the Milwaukee cordless or the other track saws but I look at the reviews. I think the Wen and presumably the Grizzly are like the Evolution saw my church has. They work but do not have all the same features as the better saws. I see them as a totally reasonable choice if that is what fits into your budget. But you seem to be able to get a better saw. I am not sure where to place the Kreg but my impression is it may be a bit better than these basic saws. I think the Makita and DeWalt are similar in capabilities but the DeWalt requires a unique track which doesn't work in it's favor. They are not quite as nice as the Festool but give up nothing in power or quality of cut. The Milwaukee cordless seems to have fewer differences from the Festool than even the DeWalt or Makita. I see it as a great choice if you already have other Milwaukee tools. Track saws don't require dust collection but they are set up for it and it is nice to use because they spew a good volume of dust (like a circular saw). If you are already attaching a vacumn hole (I use a Bosch 6 meter hose on my Rigid shop vac) it isn't a big deal to also attach a power cord, especially in my shop. I've copied the Festool idea but using computer connectors so I have a power cord on the vacumn hose so I can just move both from my sander to my track saw to my domino as I work. So I'm not sure how much hassle reduction would come from a battery operated saw if you also use a vacumn but I don't see that it would hurt anything either. If I were to buy a battery powered track saw any time soon it would be the Milwaukee.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    2,567
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Dwight View Post
    I own a corded DeWalt track saw and use an Evolution track saw at church sometimes. I've never used the Milwaukee cordless or the other track saws but I look at the reviews. I think the Wen and presumably the Grizzly are like the Evolution saw my church has. They work but do not have all the same features as the better saws. I see them as a totally reasonable choice if that is what fits into your budget. But you seem to be able to get a better saw. I am not sure where to place the Kreg but my impression is it may be a bit better than these basic saws. I think the Makita and DeWalt are similar in capabilities but the DeWalt requires a unique track which doesn't work in it's favor. They are not quite as nice as the Festool but give up nothing in power or quality of cut. The Milwaukee cordless seems to have fewer differences from the Festool than even the DeWalt or Makita. I see it as a great choice if you already have other Milwaukee tools. Track saws don't require dust collection but they are set up for it and it is nice to use because they spew a good volume of dust (like a circular saw). If you are already attaching a vacumn hole (I use a Bosch 6 meter hose on my Rigid shop vac) it isn't a big deal to also attach a power cord, especially in my shop. I've copied the Festool idea but using computer connectors so I have a power cord on the vacumn hose so I can just move both from my sander to my track saw to my domino as I work. So I'm not sure how much hassle reduction would come from a battery operated saw if you also use a vacumn but I don't see that it would hurt anything either. If I were to buy a battery powered track saw any time soon it would be the Milwaukee.
    And another thank you, Jim.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,143
    Jim, the dewalt doesn't require a special track. I use mine with both the dewalt tracks and the festool tracks. The dewalt tracks give you two sides to cut on (so you either don't have to flip the track or can use two different blades) and the festool allow you to use jigs and fixtures (like parallel and angle guides).

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Dwight View Post
    I own a corded DeWalt track saw and use an Evolution track saw at church sometimes. I've never used the Milwaukee cordless or the other track saws but I look at the reviews. I think the Wen and presumably the Grizzly are like the Evolution saw my church has. They work but do not have all the same features as the better saws. I see them as a totally reasonable choice if that is what fits into your budget. But you seem to be able to get a better saw. I am not sure where to place the Kreg but my impression is it may be a bit better than these basic saws. I think the Makita and DeWalt are similar in capabilities but the DeWalt requires a unique track which doesn't work in it's favor. They are not quite as nice as the Festool but give up nothing in power or quality of cut. The Milwaukee cordless seems to have fewer differences from the Festool than even the DeWalt or Makita. I see it as a great choice if you already have other Milwaukee tools. Track saws don't require dust collection but they are set up for it and it is nice to use because they spew a good volume of dust (like a circular saw). If you are already attaching a vacumn hole (I use a Bosch 6 meter hose on my Rigid shop vac) it isn't a big deal to also attach a power cord, especially in my shop. I've copied the Festool idea but using computer connectors so I have a power cord on the vacumn hose so I can just move both from my sander to my track saw to my domino as I work. So I'm not sure how much hassle reduction would come from a battery operated saw if you also use a vacumn but I don't see that it would hurt anything either. If I were to buy a battery powered track saw any time soon it would be the Milwaukee.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Moscow, ID
    Posts
    408
    I have both the Dewalt corded and cordless track saws, with the Dewalt tracks. The cordless has all the power of the corded model, and is great to use outside of the shop. I have used it while framing my deck, trimming the support beams to length, and will use it to cut the 45 degree angles on my outside deck boards (picture frame border). I will probably get rid of my corded saw as I don't see using it now that I have to cordless version.

    I've considered getting the Festool tracks to be able to use the jigs, but that's a pretty big expense for something I might not use much.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    1,530
    Would I be wasting money on a cordless track saw if it's just for my shop and I won't take it to job sites? T
    Absolutely.

    Even if you already own the M18 batteries, you’d be putting wear and tear on them with little to no benefit. You don’t need the portability. If you don’t own the batteries , buying them just for a low use tool is not fiscally sound.

    Something no one has mentioned yet is the balance / ergonomics of these battery saws. They are heavier and not as well balanced as their electric siblings. Not a total deal breaker , but if you don’t need the cordless aspect it’s kinda pointless to suffer the penalty no matter how small.

    If this is primarily for casework , I’d strongly suggest you get the Festool rail with the holes in so you can have 32mm capability down the road. It’ll work with the Festool saw as well as the Makita and a few others.

    Another contender would be the Bosch saw (which has a 32mm hole guide) but that uses an entirely different track system that has less support from OEM as well as third party vendors for accessories.

    My take is the Makita represents the best value , though I’ve seen Bosch saws on sale or close out that make it a compelling choice too. Not at full price though ! Great saw , just not as good a value at full price compared to the Makita. A used festool may be an option as they outsell everyone and have for decades. Their numerous owners also suffer from upgradeitis too.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    2,567
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    Absolutely.

    Even if you already own the M18 batteries, you’d be putting wear and tear on them with little to no benefit. You don’t need the portability. If you don’t own the batteries , buying them just for a low use tool is not fiscally sound.

    Something no one has mentioned yet is the balance / ergonomics of these battery saws. They are heavier and not as well balanced as their electric siblings. Not a total deal breaker , but if you don’t need the cordless aspect it’s kinda pointless to suffer the penalty no matter how small.

    If this is primarily for casework , I’d strongly suggest you get the Festool rail with the holes in so you can have 32mm capability down the road. It’ll work with the Festool saw as well as the Makita and a few others.

    Another contender would be the Bosch saw (which has a 32mm hole guide) but that uses an entirely different track system that has less support from OEM as well as third party vendors for accessories.

    My take is the Makita represents the best value , though I’ve seen Bosch saws on sale or close out that make it a compelling choice too. Not at full price though ! Great saw , just not as good a value at full price compared to the Makita. A used festool may be an option as they outsell everyone and have for decades. Their numerous owners also suffer from upgradeitis too.
    Very good advice. Thanks.

    I am wavering between the Makita with a tail and the cordless Milwaukee. I will have to dig deeper into the Milwaukee to see what the options are. Thus far I have seen only full kits with batteries, charger and carrying case and I don't need all that.

    I have looked online many times for used Festool tools. All I have ever seen are the plastic carrying cases and a couple of sanders. Never have I seen any saws or, of course, a Domino.

  10. #10
    I have a Domino XL and I bought it used but paid about what a new one costs. It was worth it. By far the best way to cut mortises and make mortise and tenon joints in my opinion. But you have to avoid the trap of only using the premade tenons or you will have weaker joints. I make my own tenons and make any size the project calls for. So the joints are normal size and just as strong as an integral tenon (as long as I glue it up properly). My shop is small, however, and I think there is a case that a big floor standing mortise machine may be at least as good but I don't have nearly enough room for that. The domino stores under the workbench ready to go on a moments notice.

    I see no reason to spend the extra dollars on a Festool track saw, however. I assume it would be nicer to use and some of the extras would be useful but my DeWalt makes cuts every bit as accurately as my SS table saw. The cut quality is just as good. I made all the glue joints for my 10 foot long dining room table with it. I want a track saw to make good quality accurate cuts. For the price difference, I would buy a DeWalt or Makita. The Makita is probably better since you can use many jigs sold for the Festool.

    Being naturally cheap, I would be tempted to try and use after market tracks, however. But others report issues with them so I am not sure. Powertec is one company that offers them. Tracks are a significant part of a track saw's cost.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    2,567
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Dwight View Post
    I have a Domino XL and I bought it used but paid about what a new one costs. It was worth it. By far the best way to cut mortises and make mortise and tenon joints in my opinion. But you have to avoid the trap of only using the premade tenons or you will have weaker joints. I make my own tenons and make any size the project calls for. So the joints are normal size and just as strong as an integral tenon (as long as I glue it up properly). My shop is small, however, and I think there is a case that a big floor standing mortise machine may be at least as good but I don't have nearly enough room for that. The domino stores under the workbench ready to go on a moments notice.

    I see no reason to spend the extra dollars on a Festool track saw, however. I assume it would be nicer to use and some of the extras would be useful but my DeWalt makes cuts every bit as accurately as my SS table saw. The cut quality is just as good. I made all the glue joints for my 10 foot long dining room table with it. I want a track saw to make good quality accurate cuts. For the price difference, I would buy a DeWalt or Makita. The Makita is probably better since you can use many jigs sold for the Festool.

    Being naturally cheap, I would be tempted to try and use after market tracks, however. But others report issues with them so I am not sure. Powertec is one company that offers them. Tracks are a significant part of a track saw's cost.
    Thanks for the tips.

    Yeah, I would like to get a Domino. I've got a few other priorities for right now. Years ago I was at my local Woodcraft admiring the Festool display. A guy came up next to me and said, "I'm building an entertainment center. I think that Domino will work really well for it." Before I could warn him about the price, he walked over to the counter and said, "Hey, how much is that Domino?"

    The guy at the counter said, "Hang on, I'll look it up". He pulled out a Festool chart, ran his finger down the list and said, "I can sell it you for $887". The customer's mouth literally dropped open and just hung there. He walked out and his mouth was still hanging open.

    Of course, I should have bought a Domino at the $887 price. Now they're almost twice the price.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    Redmond, OR
    Posts
    539
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Germain View Post
    The Milwaukee track saw is expensive, but it appears to me any of the really good track saws are pretty expensive. If they're going to be expensive, I might was well get a really good example.
    This was exactly my thinking. I spent more on my track saw than any other woodworking tool in my shop (I don't buy new tools for the most part). After a lot of research and reading to make sure I was getting the best for my money I ended up buying a Mafell track saw which runs on Bosch tracks (Mafell puts their own name on the same tracks and sell for a lot more money). One of the advantages to the Bosch track system is that it uses a connector that eliminates any misalignment of two tracks being butted together... which is supposed to be superior to the Festool and other track systems.

    https://www.timberwolftools.com/mafe...unge-track-saw

    I am VERY pleased with my Mafell! The one time I took it out of the shop was to cut the bottoms off a bunch of interior doors for a friend that was getting new flooring. Not having a cordless was not an issue for that job. The Milwaukee cordless was not available when I purchased my Mafell so it didn't make my list to research.

    It looks like the Milwaukee cordless track saw uses the Festool track system?
    Last edited by Michael Schuch; 10-26-2023 at 9:42 PM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    Redmond, OR
    Posts
    539
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    It has a nice feature that it can "stick" to the track (requires the Milwaukee track for this feature) which adds the utility that Festool has with their construction type saws and only recently embraced on the latest "fine work" track saw. But the red tool is still completely compatible with Festool, Makia and Mafial tracks. .
    A Mafell track saw has allowances to run on a Festool track but its native track system is Bosch. To have the anti tilt (stick to the track) feature with the Mafell saw it requires the use of the Mafell / Bosch track. On a Festool track there is no lip for the saw to lock under and the saw can accidentally tilt just like a Festool saw. The lip / anti-tilt is really only needed when cutting at a pretty steep (near 45 degree) bevel with the motor way up in the air. On square (90 degree) cuts the extra lip doesn't really do anything to improve the saw or the cut.
    Last edited by Michael Schuch; 10-26-2023 at 10:03 PM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    64,706
    Michael, as I mentioned previously, the new Milwaulkee setup has the "clip to the track" feature. It's true that it's not available on the regular Festool and Makita tracks, but Festool does have a clip to track feature on their HKC saws and the new TS 60 KEB-F can also clip onto the FSK cross cutting tracks.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    6,837
    Makita also has clips to hold it to the tracks.
    It's been a welcome change for me with the Makita cordless I bought to replace the Festool corded saw I had.
    The Festool was a bit adventurous to use for 45* cuts - the Makita is quite tame.

    It's good Milwaukee included that feature. It's also nice to see a riving knife on the Milwaukee.
    If I weren't as heavily invested in Makita tools/batteries, I would get the Milwaukee cordless saw.

    (or Ridgid - I see Ridgid has the track lock feature also. All around, Ridgid has a very nice looking track saw also)

    Added weight on a track saw is a positive since it allows the momentum of the saw to work for you, not against you.
    Since the saw rides on solid tracks and it has it's side to side thrashing eliminated, the added weight just makes the saw go straight down the track easier.
    For non-track use, I absolutely agree - nothing beats light and handy. I seldom, if ever, use my Ryobi 7 1/4" circular saw. I grab my Makita 5 1/2" cordless circular saw instead or my 3 1/2" 12V Makita trim saw.
    Last edited by Rich Engelhardt; 10-27-2023 at 2:07 PM.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •