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Thread: Cat Gate

  1. #1

    Cat Gate

    Hello,

    Longtime reader, rare poster. Trying to answer the call for more project posts. We had a problem with our cats causing mischief in our bedrooms, to put it kindly. We wanted to allow airflow through the house while keeping the cats in the main living area, so I designed a door to do that.

    Here is the finished product-

    IMG_2710.jpg

    The diagonals are friction fit, sort of like a paired down kumiko asa-no-ha pattern. The grid is lap jointed. All other joints are mortise and tenons.

    I processed all the stock from rough boards from a local sawmill with hand tools.

    IMG_1505.jpg

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    In this process, I broke a blade on my Japanese pull saw and decided to invest in a western push saw, happy I made the switch.

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    Cutting the through mortise and tenons was very satisfying.
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    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Laying out the half lap joints was helped by some clamps.
    IMG_1698.jpg

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    IMG_1730.jpg
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
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    27,760
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    Great looking door Matt.

    I made a gate to keep cats out of some shelves used for clothes and such > https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?262272

    Mine was only a few feet tall instead of a full doorway.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
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    7,652
    I'll echo Jim, great design and execution. Cats causing mischief? I can't conceive of such a thing. I inherited 4 of the little moggys.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Corcoran, MN
    Posts
    372
    That's handsome, Matt.

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Harms View Post
    I'll echo Jim, great design and execution. Cats causing mischief? I can't conceive of such a thing. I inherited 4 of the little moggys.
    Curt - A few years ago I decided to allow full access to my basement shop when I'm not there. Nothing has been disturbed and no one pees on the floor (even I). Stella, the beauty of the family, sleeps on the old leather chair in the corner. It's a quiet and happy place.
    05BAD2AF-6486-46AD-963B-7648DD0A618C.jpg
    Last edited by Bruce Mack; 10-06-2023 at 4:31 PM.

  6. #6
    Thanks,

    Unfortunately, a few feet tall wouldn't stop these cats.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Corcoran, MN
    Posts
    372
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Riegerix View Post
    Thanks,

    Unfortunately, a few feet tall wouldn't stop these cats.
    Matt,
    Absolutely true. My wife and I adopted many kittens and young cats from a nearby rescue. We can now laugh at the memory of them defeating all of the barriers and going where they wanted. I kept the shop door closed while the rest of the house took hits. The remaining seniors are relatively sedate.

  8. #8
    Hi Matt,

    That's an elegant solution to a vexing problem. What wood did you use? Looks like white oak?

    We have a child barrier up in the hallway to keep our cat contained. We have to step over to get into the bedrooms. As much as I like your solution, I will not be showing your pictures to my wife

    Thanks for sharing and will look forward to seeing more of your work.

    Best,
    Chris
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  9. #9
    Hi Chris,

    The wood is ponderosa pine, I got wet from a local sawmill, air dried it in my backyard.

    I had originally planned on filling in the full asa-no-ha pattern like this smaller grid I made-
    IMG_20210118_091010_486.jpg
    But I decided to simplify, I am glad I did as the mechanics of a swinging door are much different than a sliding shoji door(especially with kids in the house), and my humidity swings in New Mexico are quite different from Japan, causing my friction fit pieces to have fallen out and had to be replaced with longer pieces in the last year since I built the door.

    Thanks,
    Matt

  10. #10
    That's some nice looking p-pine, which we have lots of in the woods here, but I haven't ever used for wood working (but have for wood sheds!). May have to rethink!

    Best,
    Chris
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

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