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Thread: Going Rate for Patio Door Glass Replacement

  1. #1
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    Going Rate for Patio Door Glass Replacement

    I have a thermo pane glass door 48x80 nominal size with glass 46x76 this is one of two. Last time I paid $500 5 or 6 years ago to replace the glass and I have had those doors off myself its heavy but its just lifting the wheels off the track and tilting up and out. I was quoted today $2080 with tax, that is just the glass for one door?

    I can buy new Pella grade windows frame 8 foot kit and all, but 30 years newer and Energy Star rated for $1800?
    Last edited by Bill George; 09-14-2023 at 8:18 AM.
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa.HVAC/R , Cloudray Galvo Fiber , -Windows 10

  2. #2
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    I think what you are seeing is the glass is the most expensive part of the window and new glass installed in a production line in a factory is much cheaper than new glass installed as a one off in a glass shop. Reusing the old frame saves less than the labour to R&R the glass.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    I think what you are seeing is the glass is the most expensive part of the window and new glass installed in a production line in a factory is much cheaper than new glass installed as a one off in a glass shop. Reusing the old frame saves less than the labour to R&R the glass.
    But I have two others both cost me $500 each time one 15 years ago and another 5 years ago?
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa.HVAC/R , Cloudray Galvo Fiber , -Windows 10

  4. #4
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    I think it is called inflation, .

  5. #5
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    Are you just buying the glass, or having someone come to do the replacement?

    The most expensive glass I've ordered was for some custom skylights in a standing seam roof. The outer layer was 1/4" bronze safety glass, 1/2" argon, and inside 1/4" laminated tempered glass. 10 of those delivered was $33.50 a square foot six years ago. Both of those types of glass were much more expensive than regular tempered glass.

    If doing it yourself and the glass is the same size, buy a patio door from Lowes, use the glass, and throw the rest away.

  6. #6
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    Well when I can buy a complete setup for a 8 foot span with the 2 four foot doors from Lowes, Pella brand Energy Star rated for $1800 plus install in the existing rough in makes you kind of wonder.
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa.HVAC/R , Cloudray Galvo Fiber , -Windows 10

  7. #7
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    We're still using the 1974 Caradco wooden 8' slider in the rental house. I replaced the weatherstripping, rollers, put a snap on stainless steel track on it, and it works as good as a new one. The ones I was talking about from lowes were a few hundred dollars to just get the glass.

    Did you get your price from a glass place?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    We're still using the 1974 Caradco wooden 8' slider in the rental house. I replaced the weatherstripping, rollers, put a snap on stainless steel track on it, and it works as good as a new one. The ones I was talking about from lowes were a few hundred dollars to just get the glass.

    Did you get your price from a glass place?
    Yes and the guy doing the estimate did not even know how the doors came out??
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa.HVAC/R , Cloudray Galvo Fiber , -Windows 10

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill George View Post
    Yes and the guy doing the estimate did not even know how the doors came out??
    Right. Here is our fundamental problem when requiring anything done involving the trades. It's not the craftsman's fault. He was taught by someone who was taught by someone who kinda-sorta knew how to get something done. These people are not dumb or lazy necessarily and you do run into someone who knows what they're doing now and again. Most lower quality workers actually think this is how things are done (just getting by without proper training) because that is how they were taught. With this baseline of worker it will often be cheaper (and safer) to install new as opposed to fix existing. I have always preferred to build-new as opposed to repair, remodel or refinish. The loss of skill set just amplifies that position. I would be tempted to do a full replacement based on new tech and current installation availability.
    "A hen is only an egg's way of making another egg".


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  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Right. Here is our fundamental problem when requiring anything done involving the trades. It's not the craftsman's fault. He was taught by someone who was taught by someone who kinda-sorta knew how to get something done. These people are not dumb or lazy necessarily and you do run into someone who knows what they're doing now and again. Most lower quality workers actually think this is how things are done (just getting by without proper training) because that is how they were taught. With this baseline of worker it will often be cheaper (and safer) to install new as opposed to fix existing. I have always preferred to build-new as opposed to repair, remodel or refinish. The loss of skill set just amplifies that position. I would be tempted to do a full replacement based on new tech and current installation availability.
    Also a new install will usually have some kind warranty. Granted, a lot of contractors also warranty their work.
    But if the craftsman/tradesman's work is of the "kinda-sorta-just-getting-by-without-proper-training", than the warranty is mostly worthless because you'll get the same quality of rework as the original.
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.

  11. #11
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    This is one of the best things for an old sliding glass door. Nothing is much simpler for working on than a sliding glass door once you get past the weight of the doors. The only reason I would go for a complete replacement is for rotten wood. These come in a bunch of different sizes. Click on the link, and a bunch should show up. Lowes even sells replacement rollers for old ones that are no longer made, like the 1974 Caradco that I mentioned earlier.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hardware-Slid...12&sr=8-1&th=1

    If anyone needs training for working on a sliding glass door, they need to be doing something else for a living anyway.

    If you need to pay someone to do this work, I expect it's a crapshoot. I have no idea.
    Last edited by Tom M King; 09-14-2023 at 12:52 PM.

  12. #12
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    Yes I have pulled a couple off and replaced the wheels, no big issue that is why I can not understand the outrageous price, that glass new is under $600.
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa.HVAC/R , Cloudray Galvo Fiber , -Windows 10

  13. #13
    Did you get a second quote from someone else?

    I've found with anything construction adjacent, prices can vary wildly. So can quality of work. And it's not unusual for these businesses to change hands and change their pricing and/or quality while keeping their old name. Plus, a lot of these places are known to do the price gouge, high pressure sales stuff or just take your money and skip town. For these reasons, I try to do as much of this kind of work myself as possible. But, if you ask around, you can probably find a decent price from a place that does decent work. Talk to your neighbors and coworkers and see what they know.

    Plus, the price for work like this varies wildly depending on where you live. So what I might pay could be a fraction of what you might pay, or vice versa.

    Either way, expect prices to go up significantly from where they were, even just a year ago. I would expect to pay close to double what you did 5 years ago. Quadruple seems a bit high to me though. So I'd shop around a bit before making a decision.

  14. #14
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    Finally got the other price and it came in $1000 less than the first. But it was double what we paid 5-6 years ago which is to be expected.
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa.HVAC/R , Cloudray Galvo Fiber , -Windows 10

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