Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 22

Thread: Hook tools and end grain

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    249

    Hook tools and end grain

    Hi all

    I have recently been bitten by a new woodturning bug which is turning small tea cups and rice bowls in end grain orientation.

    A bradford pear was recently limbed across from my shop and I grabbed some 4 - 5 dia pieces. So far really loving the lack of wood character as it really makes the form take the front, esp with all the warpage. Turning to around 1/8 from sopping wet seems to more or less dry overnight. Yea I dig warpage at the moment.

    This has been incredibly hard going. Lots of failures, which is probably why Im enjoying it so much, but am considering tooling up for end grain work. Ive been hogging out with a 3/8 bowl gouge then finishing with the lathe spinning in reverse and doing final cleanup with a bosch hollowing tool and handheld gooseneck scraper.

    Any recommendations here on a hook tool? Also been considering a hunter tool or one of those ring things but I kinda am liking the idea of a hook tool.

    Thanks for lookin!

  2. #2
    I'm sure not one to ask. Several years ago I saw a cool vid using a hook tool. I immediately purchased one and when I went to use it I was too nervous to put it to wood. I eventually gave it to a turner here on this group. I would love to hear where this takes you.
    Pete


    * It's better to be a lion for a day than a sheep for life - Sister Elizabeth Kenny *
    I think this equates nicely to wood turning as well . . . . .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    4,061
    I've used the hooded tool from Woodcut on hollow forms. It took a bit to get used to it, and I discovered lathe speed had to be running pretty slowly, but it made a nice cut What I didn't like is trying to pull the long curls from the small opening. I use the Michelsen grind on a bowl gouge for open forms. It does an amazing job on end grain. What always surprised me is how open you can have the gouge. I keep waiting for a bang, never happens. For me, the vector grinding jig was the key. Never could get a good grind on that gouge by hand.

  4. #4
    There seem to be a number of variations of them. For the hooded ones with the chip limiters on them, I have one, and it always seemed to clog up instantly or it wouldn't cut at all. I do make a lot of boxes, and have found that I can get surfaces with NRSs (negative rake scrapers). I work with dry wood for the boxes. I would expect pretty much the same for green wood turned end grain. Biggest problem would be in deciding how many different profiles you would need..... I have a bunch of them, some for square corners on the inside, and some for a more egg cup shape.

    robo hippy

  5. #5
    I have used the termite tool from Oneway for years,, https://oneway.ca/products-category/...llowing%20Tool

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    332
    I'm also a Termite tool user, I can't say that I do a lot of end-grain work but the Termite does the job. Takes a bit of getting used to like most things but once you get onto it, the tool works well. Have to admit the first time I sharpened it with the included stone and holder it seemed a little scary but went quite easily. I can't comment on how the finish surface compares with other tools.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Adelaide Hills, Australia
    Posts
    367
    .
    I used to make my own hook tools before you could buy them. Here are a couple of links on how to make your own from masonry nails...

    http://aroundthewoods.com/hooktool.shtml
    https://www.westbaywoodturners.com/t.../hook_tool.htm

    Some more on DIY...
    http://www.treecycler.org/hooks.htm

    Michael Hosaluk showed me a HSS version that he had made for him but I haven't had a chance to try it myself as I rarely do end grain work myself nowadays. If I remember correctly, Michaels is HSS... https://woodturningtoolstore.com/pro...chael-hosaluk/

    Other sources of ready made hook tools... https://www.hiltonhandcraft.com/Cata...ningTools.html

    Hook like tools used for hollowing side grain can also be used for end grain work.

    Before other options came along I used the original Shepid Loop from Woodcut for hollowing for awhile and that could be used for end grain work but was a bit tricky...
    https://www.woodcut-tools.com/arts-a...ter-p492085589

    I get on much better with Woodcut's later open sided Pro-Forme cutter... https://www.woodcut-tools.com/arts-a...fts-p492088033

    With the Pro-Forme, I much prefer the non-Flexi shaft arrangement because the standard shaft have a scraper head that allows it to rotate in the shaft in various positions for shear scraping inside hollow forms.

    Here is another one if you are feeling extra adventurous... https://www.woodcut-tools.com/arts-a...ter-p492088059

    And, then you get into the replaceable cup tip tools of which there are many. The only one I have used is the Rolly Munro, which are getting to be expensive, which in my case hasn't got much use since getting the Woodcut Pro-Forme...
    https://www.packardwoodworks.com/tools-munr.html
    Neil

    About the same distance from most of you heading East or West.

    It's easy to see the Dunning-Kruger Effect in others, but a bit of a conundrum when it comes to yourself...



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    249
    Hey all

    Thanks much for all the experienced input. Will definitely be experimenting with the Michelsen grind, I think I get it. I grind free hand and it almost seems like a mix of the 40/40 and how I grind my DSG.

    Neil, you have inspired me to give forging my own a shot. It is actually something I’ve been interested in for awhile knowing that Japanese turners still typically forge their own, as did many turners of other regions in the past. I’ll share of a few pics of what I have so far. I used a 3” cut nail for masonry. Did a few tests and it’s hard stuff. Annealed it, shaped it, quenched, and tempered.

    Kinda shooting in the dark here with shapes but look forward to gluing it up and giving it a whirl. The little pear blank it’s resting on is the typical size endgrain work I like doing.

    IMG_6146.jpgIMG_6143.jpgIMG_6141.jpg

  9. #9
    Can'e wait to see how it works! Tell me, how did you do the final tempering or annealing?
    Pete


    * It's better to be a lion for a day than a sheep for life - Sister Elizabeth Kenny *
    I think this equates nicely to wood turning as well . . . . .

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Adelaide Hills, Australia
    Posts
    367

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by chuck van dyck View Post

    Neil, you have inspired me to give forging my own a shot. It is actually something Ive been interested in for awhile knowing that Japanese turners still typically forge their own, as did many turners of other regions in the past. Ill share of a few pics of what I have so far. I used a 3 cut nail for masonry. Did a few tests and its hard stuff. Annealed it, shaped it, quenched, and tempered.

    Kinda shooting in the dark here with shapes but look forward to gluing it up and giving it a whirl.

    Looking forward to hearing how you go.

    I used to make half a dozen at a time. Setting up takes as long as doing them, and of those two would be too hard and brittle, two too soft and two just right...
    Neil

    About the same distance from most of you heading East or West.

    It's easy to see the Dunning-Kruger Effect in others, but a bit of a conundrum when it comes to yourself...



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    249
    Peter, I used a mapp torch to get it super hot then allowed it to come back to room temp on a big chunk of steel as a heat sink. Then forged the bevel in some by drawing the steel out. Got it hot again and just made the hook with needle nose pliers. Did some quick grinding to make the bevel. Got it super red again and quenched in water. Let it get back to room temp then used a propane torch to heat it to a straw color and let it slowly come back to room temp. Ive made some carving knives this way that have been great. Not the best edge retention but I always have a stone and strop nearby and constantly touch up. Same with my turning tools, hard ark slipstone constantly.

    Neil, that is smart! It is a really fun process and a box of nails is cheap. Also I have more old files than I can count, which is typically good tool steel. Thanks for sharing the tutorials.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Adelaide Hills, Australia
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by chuck van dyck View Post

    Also I have more old files than I can count, which is typically good tool steel.
    After annealing, I grind off all of the teeth and gullets + a bit more to get below any subsurface fractures in the steel from when the teeth were cut. Any fractures that remain are a point of vulnerability when the steel is hardened/tempered again.
    Neil

    About the same distance from most of you heading East or West.

    It's easy to see the Dunning-Kruger Effect in others, but a bit of a conundrum when it comes to yourself...



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    249
    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Strong View Post
    After annealing, I grind off all of the teeth and gullets + a bit more to get below any subsurface fractures in the steel from when the teeth were cut. Any fractures that remain are a point of vulnerability when the steel is hardened/tempered again.
    Makes a lot of sense! I actually had a file billet I was working on fracture and couldn’t figure out why it happened. Now I know. Learning much.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
    Posts
    3,522
    I did a hook tool class with Alan Lacer a few decades ago, we made the tools in the class and they worked well. IIRC we started with a piece of O-1 rod. I eventually broke mine I haven't made a new one but have been thinking about buying the one from Michael Hosaluk. I believe Alan has both a description in one of his books and a video on making and using the hook tool.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Adelaide Hills, Australia
    Posts
    367
    Getting the straw colour right is where under and over tempering happens. If I was doing any of this nowadays I would get one of those economy IR surface thermometer (not the medical ones) for getting the tempering temperature right.

    With those you can closely monitor your progress toward 430F or to whatever degree of tempering you prefer.

    Even the economy model that my son uses for his pizza oven gets within a few degrees of accuracy and they are not very expensive and once you have one you will find it has many uses.
    Last edited by Neil Strong; 09-16-2023 at 9:18 PM.
    Neil

    About the same distance from most of you heading East or West.

    It's easy to see the Dunning-Kruger Effect in others, but a bit of a conundrum when it comes to yourself...



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •