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Thread: Cabinetry staple gun (pneumatic)

  1. #1
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    Cabinetry staple gun (pneumatic)

    Hi,

    I've been using an 18g nailer for my cab builds. I like the idea of staples. I understand some come pre glued.

    Recommendations on staple size, type, brand, etc?

    My nailer is bostich. It seems well made to me.

  2. #2
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    Im partial to Grex. I bought an 18 gauge 1/4" crown stapler a couple months ago and love it. And as far as the grex stuff goes it was affordable.
    https://www.acmetools.com/grex-power...292100446.html

  3. #3
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    I like Senco fasteners better than any other. The glue on the legs of nails and staples holds better than a number of other brands I've used. I have one of each, and multiples of some sizes. Senco was my first brand, and still my first choice for all but 23 ga. pins. I never bought one that didn't work, and all are still working.

  4. #4
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    That is the 9032 the 9040 goes another 5/16th in length but is decently bigger and more expensive

  5. #5
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    Grex are the bomb and I love mine. However I have also been using a $25 Harbor Freight 1/4" crown stapler for well over 10 years. Might be a good way to test the waters.
    "A hen is only an egg's way of making another egg".


    Samuel Butler

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Grex are the bomb and I love mine. However I have also been using a $25 Harbor Freight 1/4" crown stapler for well over 10 years. Might be a good way to test the waters.
    You cant go wrong with $25. It can hold your papers down if it stops working or hammer small nails

  7. #7
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    I just refuse to support that fast and cheap industry even though I have to sometimes.

    I'll look into the grex. Any other things to look into? Why certain staple sizes vs others?

  8. #8
    same as Tom, have some number of Senco stuff I bought before they did the usual leave for offshore. Last two I bought same model are so old they look art Deco. Bought them from the old guy, paid him well so much so he was a bit stunned. I knew they were cared for and older than the same model I have same gun. I think I looked up an age once and it was 70's. I can check a model memory they shoot 5/8 - 1 1/4" those ones KN 4450 or something have to check. I have the senco up to 2" that one with no safety all have no safety the 2" with no safety could be used in combat. Yeah KN4450 the antique memory working fine.
    Last edited by Warren Lake; 09-11-2023 at 4:03 PM.

  9. #9
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    Do staples wander as much as nails do? I get a little puckered up when nailing on important "show faces" with the nail gun.

  10. #10
    1/4" staples are OK, but don't hold that well because the crown is rounded so they punch through thin material like 1/4" plywood. They also tend to blow out since the gauge is thin so the legs get deflected by wood grain- it's important to not use any longer than needed. They do come in many different lengths which is good.

    I use 1/2" crown the most. Have soured on Senco over the years, now most of my guns are Makita. Even the cheap ones work pretty well these days, so it's a lot about the shape of the nose and safety.

    IME, fastener brand doesn't matter much, but Senco is good, & what's there at the lumber yard.

  11. #11
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    Andrew

    I believe staplers are simpler internally than nailers or at the very least cheaper to build. ??? From the pricey brands they all seem cheaper than their nailer counterparts.


    You may want to check Cadex

  12. #12
    Spent working years using Senco guns. SFN for nails, and SKS for staples. As for 1/4" crown staples pulling thru plywood, we shimmed the bottom of the track for staples with a piece of 1/4" plywood. This raises gun up and prevents staples from going completely thru plywood. The cheap HF combo guns (less than $20 when I bought them,) shot thousands of staples in 1/4" under layment with nary a failure.

  13. #13
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    My narrow crown stapler is an old Accuset by Senco tool. It's very handy to have, particularly when fastening thinner materials like 1/4" cabinet backs as there is less blow-through than can sometimes happen with other formats of pneumatic fasteners. I still largely am using my original supply of Senco fasteners and yes, they do have a coating on the legs that I "assume" is some kind of heat activated adhesive. They hold really well and are quite hard to pry out if one makes an, um...error...

    I also have a no-name wide-crown pneumatic gun I got off Amazon for things like fabric and cardboard or reinforcing miter joints on frames, etc, from behind. Very handy to have in the shop and inexpensive for occasional use.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
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    Jim,
    What gauge is your no name staple gun?

  15. #15
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    I have Bostitch pin and brad nailers - I'm partial to the brand because I've always used them. Grex are excellent and the older Senco are also awesome. All that said, I have no clue where my stapler is from, I almost feel it magically appeared in my shop one day (probably hf) but I can tell you it's cheap but works great. I think it's one of those pneumatic tools you can skimp on.

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