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Thread: Lubing My Table Saw

  1. #16
    WD-40 is not a lubricant, it's a water displacement product. As a matter of fact the "WD" stands for water displacement and the 40 comes from the fact that the formula that was used was the 40th version.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Sack View Post
    WD-40 is not a lubricant, it's a water displacement product. As a matter of fact the "WD" stands for water displacement and the 40 comes from the fact that the formula that was used was the 40th version.
    I've read this many times, but the WD-40 Company seems to think otherwise.



    It's in my sawmill tools bag all the time.

    John

  3. #18
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    I find that WD-40 is fine for incidental lubrication...such as the garage door hinges to keep them quiet...but I surely wouldn't use it for more serious lubrication needs. It's not all that long lasting for that purpose and more of an "I need it now" product.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #19
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    I see quite a few comments about not using WD40 and I agree. The OP asked about using WD40 quick drying silicone. I see no issue using it on the gear teeth. I would not use on the top of the saw.

  5. #20
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    I understand wd40 is kerosene/diesel fuel in a solvent carrier. So not really a lube. More of a degreaser.
    Bill D

  6. #21
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    I agree that regular WD40 may not be a lube. But, the OP referenced a different product that was a silicone dry spray and is a lubricant.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Sack View Post
    WD-40 is not a lubricant, it's a water displacement product. As a matter of fact the "WD" stands for water displacement and the 40 comes from the fact that the formula that was used was the 40th version.
    I think what you (and everyone else) missed is that Vince is using this:

    78B68B2F-7071-4111-8F7A-95557FAE7321.jpg42C36A2C-AF21-4717-8753-0C34DBDFAE73.jpg


    which is not reg. ol wd40 - and as Jim says is an incidental (temporary) lubricant. Water is a lubricant too ! Doesnít mean itís good or long lasting or fit for this purpose ; but it is a lubricant.

  8. #23
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    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...e?ie=UTF8&th=1

    I used this on my father saw, mine is do soon.

  9. #24
    How does the grease not become a magnet for sawdust and end up caked on the threads?

  10. #25
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    NGLI #2 grease seems thick for non powered moving parts. My Powermatic planer is NGLI #1 for all but high speed ball bearings.
    Bill D.
    https://www.acehardware.com/departme...B&gclsrc=aw.ds

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Parker View Post
    How does the grease not become a magnet for sawdust and end up caked on the threads?
    The bigger question is why people think a little sawdust is a big deal. Any lube, even dry lube, you'll get sawdust on the threads just by the fact that threads act like a shelf and sawdust floats around. The reason grease is a good lubricant is that it lasts a very long time and stays put. Just because a thread is squeaky clean doesn't mean that's a good thing. It could mean lube is gone and now you're getting metal on metal which is a million times worse than a little wood dust contact. As Dave pointed out above, lots of things are lubricants but they don't last long.
    Last edited by Michael Burnside; 09-11-2023 at 12:55 PM.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    I think what you (and everyone else) missed is that Vince is using this:

    78B68B2F-7071-4111-8F7A-95557FAE7321.jpg42C36A2C-AF21-4717-8753-0C34DBDFAE73.jpg


    which is not reg. ol wd40 - and as Jim says is an incidental (temporary) lubricant. Water is a lubricant too ! Doesnít mean itís good or long lasting or fit for this purpose ; but it is a lubricant.
    I wouldn't have it in my shop, but it's a lubricant, much better on plastic, rubber, etc where hydrocarbon lubricants would breakdown the material over time.




    John

  13. #28
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    While we’re on the subject of dust………..isn’t talcum powder a kind of lubricant ?


    It’s definitely dust.

  14. #29
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    I'm with John T in that I would not use a produce that contains silicone in my shop due to the potential for contaminating the finishing process.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Parker View Post
    How does the grease not become a magnet for sawdust and end up caked on the threads?
    It doesnít, and it doesnít matter.

    I use a light coat of grease on shaper spindle mechanisms, table saws etc.

    Itís often what the equipment manufacturers specify to useÖ.


    Regards, Rod

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