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Thread: Another whatsit thread

  1. #1

    Another whatsit thread

    This tool was found in a collection of woodworking gizmos. I have no clue what it might be used for. Shown is one of three identical faces. The cross section is an equilateral triangle and the edges anPXL_20230531_184053551 (2).jpgd point are quite sharp. Any clues?

  2. #2
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    It’s a typical deburring knife. Every machinist has one in their toolbox.
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  3. #3
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    And they are deceptively sharp. Use care!
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post
    It’s a typical deburring knife. Every machinist has one in their toolbox.
    Exactly.......
    Lee Schierer
    USNA '71
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  5. #5
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    Some are ground from a old worn triangular file.
    Bill D

  6. #6
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    I have one of these in my bowling bag. It is used to soften/enlarge the holes in a bowling ball, as needed. Very sharp!

  7. #7
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    This is a similar-looking tool that I purchased 20+ years ago. It is a three-sided Japanese spear-point scraper, whose proper name escapes me. It is constructed like a Japanese chisel, with a thin, hard layer of steel laminated to a softer core. Two of the three sides are flat; the working side is slightly hollowed (again, like the back of a Japanese chisel). This is useful for scraping into corners and other inaccessible areas.

    20230601_203159.jpg
    -- Jim

    Use the right tool for the job.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Some are ground from a old worn triangular file.
    Bill D
    Yep, this ugly old guy has deburred a lot of hardware over the years.
    Attached Images Attached Images
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  9. #9
    Look like a yari kanna (spear plane)!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Kwong View Post
    Look like a yari kanna (spear plane)!
    Yes, that's it, thank you! The yari kanna (also transliterated as yarri ganna) was a forerunner of the modern plane, used from 1000 AD (or earlier) to smooth surfaces produced by adzes. Mine is a small one, 220 mm (~8") in overall length, with a blade that is 60 mm (~2⅜") by 17 mm (11/16"); it has a nice turned boxwood handle. There are also much larger two-handed spear planes. It is usually used with the bottom almost flat on the surface, drawn at an angle towards the user, and produces fine shavings. I have also used it with a gentle push stroke, one hand on the handle, a finger or two on the blade, to scrape into tight corners.
    -- Jim

    Use the right tool for the job.

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