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Thread: Glue solid edging to baltic birch

  1. #1
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    Glue solid edging to baltic birch

    I will be using T-III for gluing 1/2" x 2" HM solid wood to the edge of 18mm Baltic Birch [HM centered on the BB edge - like a 32" L x 4" H x 2" flange width I-beam]

    A pair of these will be runners and kickers for opposing 13" wide x 15" deep drawers in a coffee table, if that matters. 32" clear span, except for Z-clips outside the drawer run for attaching table top.

    I plan on sanding to 120 - 150 to flatten BB edge. Can I expect the same adhesion as if I was gluing HM to HM?

    Any special prep to the edge of the BB? Screws appropriate? Screws into cross-bore wood dowels? Or am I over-driving my headlights here - shut up and glue.
    Beginning woodworker and amateur, proudly specializing in overly ornate, busy, ridiculously over-decorated, and garnished to the point of distaste details

  2. #2
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    Nope, because half of the contact area on the edge of baltic birch is end grain.

  3. #3
    Just glue it. It won't be as strong as long grain to long grain solid wood, but it will be strong enough. An accurately sawn edge will serve well for gluing. If you want a slightly stronger joint that is easier to align add splines or biscuits.

  4. #4
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    When I create a cabinet carcass with plywood and the edge will be visible, I used to use edge banding but now I use solid wood that I glue in place. Never had a problem with it. Understand that I am essentially creating my own thicker edge banding and it is not taking a lot of stress. My banding is usually about 1/2" (10 mm or so) thick.

    I am having a bit of trouble understanding what you want to accomplish here since your description does not read like edge banding to me. If I understand what you are doing, you are creating an "I beam" like edge. If this is not like a simple edge banding, I would do something like create a dado or rabbet for the plywood to go into. But I am probably reading this wrong.

  5. #5
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    I think I can see what you're after.
    I'd also create a dado - just to increase the glue surface.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  6. #6
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    I was also going to say add a dado. If the banding is wider than the plywood, it will not only make it stronger, but easier to put together correctly.

  7. #7
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    When glueing to ply edges with always double coat as the end grain plys will soak up the glue fast.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Calhoon View Post
    When glueing to ply edges with always double coat as the end grain plys will soak up the glue fast.
    This! Plus watering down that first coat a little helps. Maybe even coat both surfaces after the first sealing coat dries.
    Ask a woodworker to "make your bed" and he/she makes a bed.

  9. #9
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    1/8 or 1/4 spline would be great for this application and would save you some heartache during the glue up.

    Since the edge will be proud of the plywood, I imagine there is a greater likelihood that someone will catch a book etc on it and potentially damage it.

  10. #10
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    Thanks all for the input.

    These assemblies will be hidden in the coffee table case work. 2" flange over 3/4" ply leaves plenty width for 3/8" drawer sides to hit the runners and kickers. Precision alignment ain't required. Anyone that hooks an edge with a book is a wizard.

    I don't have a full shop, so my capabilities are limited. The dado is interesting, but not practical for me.

    The points Joe and Gordon made about sizing are something I'll do.

    Thanks for your time and interest.

    Kent
    Beginning woodworker and amateur, proudly specializing in overly ornate, busy, ridiculously over-decorated, and garnished to the point of distaste details

  11. #11
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    To get best strength you'll want to use plenty of glue. Be sure to remove the squeeze out while soft, or use tape.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    ...Be sure to remove the squeeze out while soft...
    Good grooming tip. Thanks, Tom
    Beginning woodworker and amateur, proudly specializing in overly ornate, busy, ridiculously over-decorated, and garnished to the point of distaste details

  13. #13
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    I would use WEST epoxy.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy bessette View Post
    I would use WEST epoxy.
    Yeah. That would do well. Not my thing, though - too late in the game. Old dog. New Tricks.

    I use T-88 for some structural-type applications especially outdoorsy, but not regular furniture joinery.
    Beginning woodworker and amateur, proudly specializing in overly ornate, busy, ridiculously over-decorated, and garnished to the point of distaste details

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kent A Bathurst View Post
    {{snip}}
    I don't have a full shop, so my capabilities are limited. The dado is interesting, but not practical for me.
    {{snip}}
    Thanks for your time and interest.

    Kent
    You can cobble together an impromptu router table for just a few dollars.
    A 2X2 square of 3/4" plywood A a scrap of straight wood and a couple clamps for a fence is about all it takes.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

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