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Thread: Cutting 6 inch PVC Thin-Wall Sewer and Drain Pipe

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Chambersburg, PA
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    Cutting 6 inch PVC Thin-Wall Sewer and Drain Pipe

    30-some years ago when I installed my 6" S&D dust collection piping, I think I got the best cutting results with a fine blade in a jig saw. But to tell you the truth, I don't really remember for sure. I'm helping a friend with his DC piping, so I'm wondering what tool everyone is getting good results with. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Atlanta
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    Table-saw or bandsaw for me. Just depends on which is easier to clean off when I need to cut a piece.

  3. #3
    I use a simple hacksaw unless Im cutting it all day and in that case I would use a battery powered reciprocating saw (sawzall)
    Still waters run deep.

  4. #4
    I take a long piece of paper or poster board, wrap around and mark all the way around with a marker and cut with a jigsaw.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
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    N CA
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    https://www.acehardware.com/departments/tools/hand-tools/hand-saws/2017176?x429=true&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjtO87IeN_wIVUx 19Ch3N9g6SEAQYAyABEgJ9yPD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds


    I’ve run miles and miles of pipe. About 15 yrs ago I bought one of these Lenox saws and it does a fabulous job of making straight cuts. Get a good wrap around and walk the line.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Charleston, SC
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    27
    When I have time and space I mark around the pipe and cut with a japanese saw, rotate the pipe a few times to keep seeing the line. When I am cutting existing pipe or in a tight space I use a reciprocating saw.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
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    I've used both an ordinary carpenter's hand saw and a 12" blade in a sawzall. Both worked fine, the choice was based on which was closest to hand.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Collegeville PA (30 min west of Philly)
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    I just use the miter saw and rotate the piece to finish the cut.
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    218
    John, if you use any power tool to cut the pipe, be sure your pipe is securely clamped to something — the fence, a table, whatever — before you cut it, because the power tool blade will grab the pipe and try to rip it out of your hand.
    Don't let it bring you down,
    It's only castles burning,
    Just find someone who's turning,
    And you will come around

    Neil Young (with a little bit of emphasis added by me)

    Board member, Gulf Coast Woodturners Association

  10. #10
    A cheap triangle-tooth big box store handsaw is what I used on 4" and 6" thinwall PVC.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darrell Bade View Post
    I take a long piece of paper or poster board, wrap around and mark all the way around with a marker and cut with a jigsaw.
    This is what I do for DC pipe. I use thin wall (ASTM-2729).
    New Shop at 7 mo (9).jpg
    The life so short, the craft so long to learn. --Hippocrates

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    McKean, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip Mitchell View Post
    I use a simple hacksaw unless I’m cutting it all day and in that case I would use a battery powered reciprocating saw (sawzall)
    This is what I do. A band saw is limited in lengths you can cut off and has a very small table for working with 10 foot lengths. Table saws can also grab and rotating a piece on a table saw to make a complete cut would be dangerous.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA '71
    Go Navy!

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    As many types of saws as I have, I didn't have exactly what I needed, or wanted to use, for cutting some composite columns that needed to be accurately cut to fit a porch floor with some slope. I bought a meat cutting saw that worked like a charm. I wanted to cut it with a hand saw, but a regular hacksaw was too small, and I didn't want to even try one of my wood cutting handsaws on them. I can't think of anything that would have worked any better.

    Since then, I've used it for cutting some 8" schedule 40 water pipe, and it works great for that too. I marked with a wrap, and kept turning the pipe to keep cutting it on the near side after starting the cut on the top. Following a line was no problem at all.

    https://www.amazon.com/Weston-Butche...05&sr=8-5&th=1

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    NC Piedmont
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    Coincidentally I spent the afternoon digging up and repairing a broken irrigation line. My Starrett PVC saw is similar to the Lenox I think. It cuts quick which is important when you are lying on your stomach in the mud. IMG_7556.jpg

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
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    2,751
    Knowing that I was going to have to make a lot of cuts, I made a jig. The jig was made of two 1 1/2 thick plywood (ie., two layers of 3/4 plywood glued together) with a 6" S&D hole in the center and bolted together with a washer separating them, to allow for a 12" sawzall blade to fit between them and get the cut close to 90 degrees. Works pretty good. Not perfrectly square but pretty close. In the few places they needed to be exactly 90 degrees (such as the inner edge of the blast gate), I trimmed by running them through the tablesaw using a 4" tall fence on the miter gauge.

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