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Thread: Cataract Surgery

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Friday afternoon I had cataract surgery on my left eye.

    This morning the world was bright, crisp and in 3D, something it hasn’t been in awhile.

    Modern technology really is indistinguishable from magic.

    Regards, Rod
    For my brother, it ended up being evil black magic.
    The butcher screwed up and it cost my brother the sight in one eye.
    He's gone to three other doctors trying to put together some sort of legal action against the butcher.
    Each one of those three admit he really botched the job and made a mess of things, but, they refuse to be a part of any legal action.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  2. #17
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    I am nearly 70 and going for the same surgery. There are many factors but specifically the star light condition at night is a known result from the type of lens used.
    Basically there are 3 types of lenses
    Toric for astigmatism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGtkGDyO6ws

    Multifocal for all around distance and close up focus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNVlxfDrD7Q

    and what is considered the standard lens single focal for near or far correction https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCGpJdRU4Gk

    Night halos are common with toric and guaranteed with the multifocal lenses from everything I have looked into no pun intended
    calabrese55
    Let your hands tell the story of the passion in your heart

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike calabrese View Post
    I am nearly 70 and going for the same surgery. There are many factors but specifically the star light condition at night is a known result from the type of lens used.
    Basically there are 3 types of lenses
    Toric for astigmatism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGtkGDyO6ws

    Multifocal for all around distance and close up focus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNVlxfDrD7Q

    and what is considered the standard lens single focal for near or far correction https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCGpJdRU4Gk

    Night halos are common with toric and guaranteed with the multifocal lenses from everything I have looked into no pun intended
    calabrese55
    You got it exactly right.
    The single focal lens has the lowest probability of causing night vision problem, but [unfortunately] not "no probability."
    It is why I chose the single focal lenses.
    But mine still caused problems in my left eye. It's slightly annoying when driving, but really annoying for observing.

    The other lens related cause is that for at last the last 15(?) years all the lenses are the folding type which requires a smaller incision for insertion.
    That makes it easier to insert and reduces the chances for infection.
    But those folding lenses also have squared off edges whereas the older, non folding ones had more rounded edges.

    Anyone who knows about lenses (or optics) knows that sharp edges cause stray light refraction, and that is what causes the increased ""dysphotopsia" that is much more apparent at night with car-lights, streetlights etc.

    The lens "physics" for multifocals and torics (toric lenses correct astigmatisms) can exacerbate the "stray light" refraction problem.
    Last edited by Patty Hann; 05-21-2023 at 10:36 AM.
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.Ē

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I wear progressive lenses and so does Professor Dr. SWMBO. Even my computer glasses (that I have on as I type this) are progressive, but with the majority in the mid-range distance. I have no nighttime issues when driving etc. While The Professor is not driving anymore for medical reasons, she did have some night time issues, but it was largely attributed to the specific eye problems she has. She wore an overlay lens/glasses that specifically dealt with that if she had to drive at night.
    I think they are talking about progressive cataract lenses not glasses

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerome Stanek View Post
    I think they are talking about progressive cataract lenses not glasses
    Ah...I missed that.

    ------
    My Dr. and I discussed splitting near/far as I had already had LASIK in 2003 and had good far vision, but in the end, I decided to stay with optimized for distance. I do wear glasses as previously noted, but they primarily take care of very near to mid-range vision. I'm near 20/20 in both eyes for distance.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #21
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    I had cataract surgery about ten years ago and went with the multifocal lens. Best decision of my life, wish I could of had it done decades ago. I wore glasses for short sightedness since I was 12 and sometimes wore contacts for sports. My prescription was at the extreme limit of the available lenses, don't know if stronger lenses are available now. My surgeon was one of the pioneers in multi focal lenses and has a procedure he developed named after him (the Blaylock Procedure). I was one of his first 1000 patients, he has now done over 70,000 procedures. I had both eyes done at the same time, had a minor follow-up laser repair about a year later for some scar tissue. Both my distant and close up vision are good, intermediate distance fair (got computer glasses years ago but never wear them). I recently got glasses for driving but rarely wear them except at night. I get the hallows at night but it's tolerable. A friend had multifocal lenses last year and could not tolerate the hallows had to change lenses. I tried contacts with long and short focus decades ago and could not tolerate them, messed up depth perception and gave me headaches.
    Find a surgeon with a good reputation and explore all the options before you decide.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    I had cataract surgery about ten years ago and went with the multifocal lens. Best decision of my life, wish I could of had it done decades ago.... My surgeon was one of the pioneers in multi focal lenses and has a procedure he developed named after him (the Blaylock Procedure).....I had both eyes done at the same time, had a minor follow-up laser repair about a year later for some scar tissue. Both my distant and close up vision are good, intermediate distance fair (got computer glasses years ago but never wear them). I recently got glasses for driving but rarely wear them except at night. I get the hallows at night but it's tolerable. A friend had multifocal lenses last year and could not tolerate the hallows had to change lenses. ...Find a surgeon with a good reputation and explore all the options before you decide.
    Good advice about a surgeon... also... was the LASER surgery for the scar tissue the YAG capsulotomy?
    I had the YAG surgery done on both eyes several weeks following the cataract surgery because of the "diffraction spikes" which were initially in both eyes due to a wrinkle forming (not uncommon) in the eye capsule when the lens was inserted.
    It eliminated the diffraction spikes and reduced the starburst effects a lot (which are only in the left eye). Typically tho' a YAG isn't done until much later, maybe years later and then it's for scar tissue.

    For those interested... https://www.allan.vu/procedures/yag-capsulotomy/
    Last edited by Patty Hann; 05-21-2023 at 12:37 PM.
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.Ē

  8. #23
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    I was one of the first patients in the world to have LASIK done (1996). I actually flew to Toronto to have it done, as it wasn't yet FDA approved in the US.

    The reason I bring this up, is that I had starbursts on point sources of nightime light ever since the surgery. Does it bother me - not at all. My brain tunes it out. Most people do. If you said to me, do you see starbursts, I would think for a second, and notice yes. But in every day life, I haven't noticed them in years.

    I got 10 years out of my LASIK, then reading glasses ever since. Progressives were by far the best option for me working in the OR with multiple depths of field focusing needed. And I'm very accustomed to them, but many people just can't get used to them. It's a very individual thing.

    Will I need cataract surgery at some point? I'm sure. Welcome to Florida. Will I get progressive lenses? Probably not. I really don't have an issue wearing glasses, both progressive sunglasses and regular glasses. 20/10 vision with them. Hard to argue with that.
    - ďItís not that Iím so smart, itís just that I stay with problems longer.Ē Ė Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

  9. #24
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    My wife got both eyes done with the $6k special lenses and I got one. Not really happy. She's still using trifocal glasses. I'm having to use glasses (generic reading glasses) more often than I did before.

    Speaking for myself: the cataract and yellow tint are gone. Astigmatism is largely gone. It was my dominant right eye and I had switched to my left eye for iton-sights pistol shooting some years ago. I'm still better shooting with my left eye despite significant cataracts and have no plans to get that eye done.

    No night vision issues.

    I felt these lenses were signifcantly over-hyped.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Friday afternoon I had cataract surgery on my left eye.

    This morning the world was bright, crisp and in 3D, something it hasnít been in awhile.

    Modern technology really is indistinguishable from magic.

    Regards, Rod
    Rod! I could not agree more. I had cataract surgery over the winter and it really is a breathtaking difference. Did we talk about cataracts when you were here? I think I had learned about mine the year before you visited.

    In my case I opted for the multi focal lenses. As a carpenter I wanted to be able to use good safety glasses or sunglasses onsite so that I did t have to mess with readers. And Iím young for cataracts so I wanted to maximize my vision.

    Iíve never been happier to spend a pile of cash on two little lenses. With the exception of really close up work in the shop I never need readers. A do get some weird prisms and starbursts at night but theyíre no big deal, theyíre actually neat looking sometimes.

    Now, the whole truth is that I had my left eye done first and itís perfect (Iím left eye dominate). My right eye was not good after the the first lens was put in. After some lengthy discussion with the doc we decided the best coarse of action was a lens swap.

    If I wasnít nervous before this (I was extremely nervous) now I was terrified. Many docs wonít even do a lens swap. Luckily that procedure went well but my right eye is still not as good as the left.

    Jeff (20/20 left, 20/30 right)

  11. #26
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    Yep...when you consider that the alternative is eventual blindness, even the surgeries that don't come out anywhere near perfect (and very few do) are still better than not having surgery at all.
    Someone mentioned the very early (or first?) cataract surgeries.
    THey would remove the clouded lens that was blocking most light, so now light could actually reach the retina, but it was unfocused; no implant technology at the time.
    So to get at least some focused images one wore glasses with lenses as thick as coke bottle bottoms. Even then vision wasn't great but, again, better than being totally blind.

    Interesting factoid: The cornea (through which is made the incision for removal of the cloudy natural lens and insertion of the new IOL) is the only part of a human body that has no blood supply; it gets oxygen directly through the air.
    The cornea is the fastest healing tissue in the human body, thus, most corneal abrasions will heal within 24-36 hours.
    Last edited by Patty Hann; 05-22-2023 at 9:50 AM.
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.Ē

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patty Hann View Post
    Good advice about a surgeon... also... was the LASER surgery for the scar tissue the YAG capsulotomy?
    I had the YAG surgery done on both eyes several weeks following the cataract surgery because of the "diffraction spikes" which were initially in both eyes due to a wrinkle forming (not uncommon) in the eye capsule when the lens was inserted.
    It eliminated the diffraction spikes and reduced the starburst effects a lot (which are only in the left eye). Typically tho' a YAG isn't done until much later, maybe years later and then it's for scar tissue.

    For those interested... https://www.allan.vu/procedures/yag-capsulotomy/
    I don't recall the details of the follow up laser procedure. I had some minor blurred vision I think and laser in the surgeon's office was used to clear it up, might not have been scarring.

  13. #28
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    At some point in the near future my ophthalmologist will schedule cataract surgery; I have 2 interesting conditions.
    Firstly my body doesnít like being worked upon, and to do things like a simple prostate biopsy had to be done under general anesthesia, and secondly, I hav incipient glaucoma, so theyíre hopefully going to use laser surgery to open the drainage ducts in my eyes.
    Iíll be going for distance lenses, and be happy to buy readers for my close up work.
    Good to hear, Rod. Hope you get to ride a lot this summer.
    Aaron
    Young enough to remember doing it;
    Old enough to wish I could do it again.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Rosenthal View Post
    Good to hear, Rod. Hope you get to ride a lot this summer.
    Aaron
    Thanks Aaron, good luck with your surgery, I also am hoping to get some riding in.

    Regards, Rod.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Rosenthal View Post
    At some point in the near future my ophthalmologist will schedule cataract surgery; I have 2 interesting conditions.
    Firstly my body doesn’t like being worked upon, and to do things like a simple prostate biopsy had to be done under general anesthesia, and secondly, I hav incipient glaucoma, so they’re hopefully going to use laser surgery to open the drainage ducts in my eyes.
    I’ll be going for distance lenses, and be happy to buy readers for my close up work.
    Good to hear, Rod. Hope you get to ride a lot this summer.
    Aaron
    Aaron:

    Good luck with your surgery. From an anesthesia standpoint it is very boring surgery. Which is about the biggest complement I can give. We love boring.

    You'll do fine.
    - ďItís not that Iím so smart, itís just that I stay with problems longer.Ē Ė Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

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