Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 38

Thread: Best type of dust collector for lung cancer survivor

  1. #1

    Best type of dust collector for lung cancer survivor

    I am a 58yo lung cancer survivor - never smoked! I have read and watched hundreds of reviews on every dust collector out there. I had narrowed it down to Supercell, G700, JCDC-2 and a Laguna C-flux 1.5. I am a hobby woodworker with 3HP table saw, 14" bandsaw, router table, planer, miter saw, drill press and spindle sander, etc. I have a Jet air filtration system already but want to add the best dust collector I can to protect my terrible lungs best I can. Everyone has their bias based on the machine they have or had and I understand that but if someone has been in my situation or can just offer some good advice I would really like to hear it! Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    64,234
    No bias to this answer: Buy the absolute best system you can afford that collects as much as possible, particularly the fines. It's not just about the dust collector, but also how the collection happens "at the machine". Work with a dust collector provider that specializes in that...Oneida, Clearvue, for example, for the larger systems. Opt for the best filtration offered. For more portable but with excellent filtration, Harvey G700 or Oneida SuperCell.

    And even with the best dust collection system configured in the most optimal way, you should still wear PPE while generating dust because the fines are the most dangerous.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Grafton NH, Boone and Howard County MO.
    Posts
    2,158
    I am sorry to learn of your battle with lung cancer. Best wishes with your care and treatment. My Dad (also a non smoker) is having impressive results from his treatment and is off on a fishing trip with a fellow Oxygenarian! I have Grizzly felt bag hand-me-downs from 2 shops that I installed Oneida system in. It has been a while since I did the research. 2 stage Oneida cyclones with pleated 2nd stage filters had very good ratings. I look forward an upgrade.

    Best regards, Maurice

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    3,477
    Blog Entries
    1
    Get yourself a cheap particle counter that will let you know just what the state of the air is at all times. For example, I can cut MDF all day long and the air stays cleaner then in my house. But it shows that the bandsaw lets some dust out so I know to wear a respirator when using it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2022
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    495
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    No bias to this answer: Buy the absolute best system you can afford that collects as much as possible, particularly the fines. It's not just about the dust collector, but also how the collection happens "at the machine". Work with a dust collector provider that specializes in that...Oneida, Clearvue, for example, for the larger systems. Opt for the best filtration offered. For more portable but with excellent filtration, Harvey G700 or Oneida SuperCell.

    And even with the best dust collection system configured in the most optimal way, you should still wear PPE while generating dust because the fines are the most dangerous.
    All very good advice, particularly the PPE notwithstanding a good DC! I will add that whatever DC you choose, ensure they are HEPA certified at the least. This means they guarantee to filter smaller particles than your average DC. The three Jim mentioned all offer such DCs. I'm partial to Harvey or Oneida having done my own personal research. I currently own an Oneida Supercell and love it.

    Very happy to hear you are a survivor!

  6. #6
    Thank you all for your comments. I wear my PPE religiously and will continue to but like you all have said, I want to do the very best possible to eliminate dust of all sizes.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2022
    Location
    Tracy, CA
    Posts
    471
    All four of those choices will filter dust particles well, but I do have some thoughts. I would probably NOT choose the Supercell. While it is a good product, it has very specific goals. If you have smaller bench-top type tools with dust ports in the small 2" or 2-1/2" range, then the Supercell is a better product because it has a high amount of suction and velocity for smaller hoses. When using smaller hoses like this, the CFM is horrible when using traditional dust collectors. Also, the Supercell is the loudest and can be very annoying (essentially, it's a shopvac on steroid). However, you have larger tools and sanding machines.

    In your situation, I would probably go with the Jet JCDC-2 because it will move the most amount of air (highest CFM due to largest impeller size). The saw / router table / planer are not as big of a concern since they produce large particle debris (but you still want good dust collection for this anyways). It is the sanders that are the most dangerous because the dust particles are so small and airborne. You want a large diameter hose/port that will pull the most amount of air so that anything airborne will float into the dust collection. The bandsaw is going to make a mess of debris regardless of what collection system you have. The miter saw dust collection can be a challenge, but you can make a custom miter saw dust collection cabinet (see Jay Bates videos) or a downdraft cabinet to connect to the JCDC-2. I have a friend who made a downdraft cabinet for his Festool Kapex and it works extremely well.

    The G-700 is very nice and has it's place. Very movable/portable. It's also the most pleasant to work with since the sound level is the quietest. You can also further reduce the sound level by turning down the speed (it's the only variable-speed option on your list). However, there are a few compromises. The grate on the 6" inlet will block larger debris that can be generated from a planer. Also, you have a fine-line on the speed when you are collecting sanding dust. If the speed is too high, the dust will completely bypass the dust bins and be pushed directly into the filter. This can clog the filter over time. Finally, it will not pull as much air/CFM as the JCDC-2 at any speed.

    The Laguna is like a cheaper version of the Jet. Lower powered and smaller impeller. But likely a decent dust collector. You might have problems getting parts from Laguna after 6-8 years if Laguna discontinues this model. The JET parts will be available for 20-30 years.

    Spindle sanders are likely the worst machine for someone with sensitive lungs because they have very poor dust collection. You will probably want to jerry-rig a 4" dust hose on top of the machine so that the airborne dust from the spindle is sucked away.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
    Posts
    3,439
    A HEPA filtered powered air purifying respirator (PAPR) on top of good dust collection at the source is what's I'd be looking at in that situation. Prevent as much dust as possible from getting into the air and then stop that which does from getting into your lungs. A PAPR is _much_ more comfortable to wear all day than other kinds of masks, which means you'll be much more likely to use it.

    Woodturners mostly use the versions with a hard hat and rated face shield for impact protection as well, but for general flat woodworking you could use one of the Tyvek hoods, which are much lighter (with safety glasses underneath, of course).

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    3,001
    I would put in a 5 hp super dust gorilla with HEPA filter. The Super cell would be my second choice. I would also place it outside the shop. It is also important to get the pick ups at each tool the best possible which likely will mean modifying your tools.

    I think the spindle sander is the most hazardous due to the fine dust generated.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Wenatchee, WA
    Posts
    411
    Or... consider switching to hand tools

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    699
    Quote Originally Posted by Monte Milanuk View Post
    Or... consider switching to hand tools
    I don't want to hijack this thread - it's important, but there's another side to this...
    Monte, I'm not sure that switching to hand tools is as effective as most people believe.
    Case in point: I'm a hybrid worker, and have the cyclone collector attached to my table saw and just got a new band saw, one of the criteria was the dust collection ports available. However, I'm in the middle of a quarter-round moulding installation at my local Synagogue, and I'm doing all the cutting using a home-made miter box and a 14 TPI crosscut saw. I have a 12" Chop Saw, and it would be faster, but I didn't want to spew sawdust everywhere.
    Interestingly, the amount of fine dust off the hand saw, while MUCH less than with power tools, is still significant. It's also very fine, and I'm careful to have the A/C on and flowing (I have COPD). Using hand tools is definitely NOT the only answer.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 05-18-2023 at 8:31 AM. Reason: fixed quote tagging
    Young enough to remember doing it;
    Old enough to wish I could do it again.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Wenatchee, WA
    Posts
    411
    Yes, there's still saw dust. But there's way less of it (look at the size of the saw kerf from a TS or MS, versus pretty much any hand saw), and it pretty much goes straight down - not spraying every where. About the only way dust from hand sawing goes airborne is from when you blow to clear the cut line, or when you're sweeping up. And that's an order of magnitude less than most operations with any power tool, unless you sink a *lot* of money into things like the 5 HP cyclone mentioned, and above average hand-held tools with dust collection designed as a first-class citizen (Festool, etc.) rather than as an after-thought. Then add in more things like a shop vac - or dust extractor (more $) and mini cyclones for *those*...

    And yes, I have most of those items, and really wish I didn't. Reality being what it is, I don't see myself ditching the planer, or the bandsaw, any time soon. So yes, my comment above was made somewhat tongue in cheek. But depending on whether a person wants to nuts spending $$$ to turn their shop into a clean room ala Pentz, or just make shavings and less dust to begin with... more hand tools may be an option - and one that was being completely overlooked.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh, Australia
    Posts
    2,596
    Clearvue has a 16" impeller and if the ducting is sized correctly will flow the most air.

    The best possible solution is a CV Max exhausted to atmosphere but many can't do that due to the local climate. Venting to atmosphere lifts the flow rate as well and while it might not be possible to exhaust to atmosphere in winter I would still do it when the weather is suitable and use filters at all other times. Using filters means that the dusty job of cleaning them produces a lot of dust so keep that in mind.

    The best dust extractor will only be as good as the ducting design and machine ports allow. All the machines should have a 6" port to maximise the flow. All ducting should be a minimum of 6" and the use of flexible hose will kill the air flow so it should be kept to a minimum. 6" machine ports means the machines have to be modified but the extraction goes up hugely so it is worth it.

    The best DE is an overall thing from machine port to the exhaust, get one part wrong and don't get the best result.

    For the absolute best result buy a 3 phase machine and use a VFD to drive it from a single phase 240V power point. This gives you speed control and unlimited starts per hour.

    I have only ever seen one dust extraction YT video that is worth watching and 99% of them are total rubbish, sadly I did not bookmark the one I am thinking of but he explained it very well.

    Bandsaws are not a problem when set up correctly but mitre saws need a LOT of airflow and a carefully designed housing to keep the dust to a minimum.
    Last edited by Chris Parks; 05-18-2023 at 8:34 AM.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    3,682
    Obviously, lots of good points here. Points I'll emphasize, as sadly I've been involved in way too many surgeries on lung cancer patients. I take this topic very seriously.

    1.) Get a particle meter. You need to know what's in the air. Many workers prefer the Dylos DC1100 (you want the model that measures the smallest 0.5 micron particles - that's the nasty stuff). If that's out of your budget, buy a cheaper one online (eBay, etc...). My rule for my personal woodworking is that I wear my respirator until the smallest particle count gets down to ambient. Sometimes lower. Considering your medical history, I might even wear it until it gets a little lower than ambient.

    2.) PPE. It's everything here. PAPR setups are very effective, but expensive. Good respirators like the 3M P100 are also very, very good. But you have to wear whichever you choose. I have no problem wearing mine for extended periods, but I'm an anesthesiologist, so it's not like its a big deal for me to wear a mask/respirator all day.

    3.) Great that you have a Jet Air Filter. I'd replace the outer replaceable filter with a higher level filtration one. In my testing, that a MERV 13 filter or higher. It will lower its CFM a little, but it's efficiency goes up, and it removes the smaller, more dangerous particles.

    4.) Get the best DC you can afford. I'm partial to Oneida as I have the 5HP version, but Clearview is a good choice too. As has been said, the Harvey is also excellent, though a different paradigm. Good ducting design/implementation is important.

    5.) Personally, in your situation, I wouldn't rely on only one air filter. I'd either purchase, or build a second one. You want centrifugal flow of the airborne particles. I'd probably just build a box filter. There's a good video on Ask This Old House to do this, and I can get you some online links to do it too. I put mine on a timer so that it runs for 45 minutes before I walk in the shop in the morning, and the particle count is much less than outside when I enter in the morning. Ah, nothing like clean air.

    6.) Keep in mind which are the "bad" tools for generating dust. Sanders for sure. Miter saws are terrible at dust collection. Table saw, etc... No cutting corners with PPE with those.
    - Its not that Im so smart, its just that I stay with problems longer. Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    4,452
    Blog Entries
    11
    Look at the filter specs. I do know that the Oneida comes with HEPA level filtration. Have had their 2 HP version for ten years. Doing it again, I would just bump up to the 3 HP model. Other comments regarding a particle counter, respirator and ambient collection are spot on.
    NOW you tell me...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •