Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 24 of 24

Thread: Talk me out of this sliding tablesaw

  1. #16
    IMHO, the question to ask yourself is, “Do I want a sliding panel saw or do I want a project?” In all my years of selling sliders, I never saw an actual business be successful with a “project”. It invariably ended up becoming a very heavy and expensive assembly table. Maybe there are folks who were able to make some vintage machine work for their business needs but imagine needing a reliable work truck, buying something made in the 80’s, then trying to maintain/get parts for it while simultaneously visiting jobsites, hauling material, etc. Folks should do whatever they want but what is your time worth? Just my 2-cents.

    Erik
    Ex-SCM and Felder rep

  2. #17
    Have you even looked at the saw and assessed the condition of the sliding table, etc? It is foolish to assume either extreme (that itís a project or that itís good to go as is) without an actual
    assessment.

    It could cut perfectly accurately like my 1980ís version of this saw (except in the last couple inches of either extreme of the table stroke) that I have had to do basically nothing to over the last few years since acquiring and putting into use.

    Or it could be a basket case and not be worth even getting for free if you had to do the moving.

    There is not much to go wrong with these saws if it is already cutting accurately and you donít have to track down critical missing parts / components.

    Is it local to you enough to have minimal time involved in an assessment of condition?
    Still waters run deep.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whidbey Island, WA
    Posts
    365
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Loza View Post
    IMHO, the question to ask yourself is, ďDo I want a sliding panel saw or do I want a project?Ē In all my years of selling sliders, I never saw an actual business be successful with a ďprojectĒ. It invariably ended up becoming a very heavy and expensive assembly table. Maybe there are folks who were able to make some vintage machine work for their business needs but imagine needing a reliable work truck, buying something made in the 80ís, then trying to maintain/get parts for it while simultaneously visiting jobsites, hauling material, etc. Folks should do whatever they want but what is your time worth? Just my 2-cents.

    Erik
    You're right there, and the immediate answer is that I want a slider, not a project.

    The projects I enjoy are those that are the items that I have space for and no immediate need. Thanks for the reminder.

    On that note I've made my 1942 16" Oliver work for my business, but I had another jointer to use while I waited 18mo for it to be ready to use. And a ~1940 Walker Turner drill press and a 1952 Walker Turner drill press - I already had 2 other drill presses so my business didn't depend on them and they didn't take up much space. Oh and a 1990 SCMI WBS massive project, but I had a big drum sander that got me by while the WBS was getting worked on.
    Timberlight Designs

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whidbey Island, WA
    Posts
    365
    All the input is very appreciated. It seems wise to pass, considering my business needs and income come first. If I had an extra several hundred sq ft to store it, and it were a more collectible piece like a Martin, it could be a good weekend project.
    Timberlight Designs

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whidbey Island, WA
    Posts
    365
    Quote Originally Posted by J.R. Rutter View Post
    Hey Jonathan, I've picked up big items like this on a whim because they were cheap or free. But ultimately, for me at least, they turned into time wasted on rehabbing or storing them before ultimately realizing that they either were not the solution I was hoping for or because they were just too worn or outdated to be truly useful. Given the floor space required for a slider, I would want to be confident that it would cut as reliably and accurately as a newer machine with fewer miles on it.
    You're right there, thanks for the nudge back to reality. After several days of work into a project machine, and it would be cheaper to simply get a much newer machine.
    Timberlight Designs

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whidbey Island, WA
    Posts
    365
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    I would agree with everything Philip Mitchell said. Check it out in person and if the carriage is not thrashed, the extension table doesn't sag, the main table is flat, the arbor runs true and quiet, the wiring looks ok, it cuts a straight line without deviation, the fences are solid and easily adjustable, all the essential parts are there and the price is right, go for it. Base your decision on condition, not age. If it needs significant work, pass it by. Those old SCMIs are pretty simple and rugged machines and a full size slider will make your work easier and more accurate. If you have room, maybe tucked into the back right corner of the slider, keep your cabinet saw for dados, general ripping and odd jobs.
    I saw it in person, and met the shop foreman, and noted that he was very rough on it, cutting down a pallet, constantly jamming it up. The saw worked but you're right, after thinking about it, the condition wasn't the best, either the saw or the shop in general.
    Timberlight Designs

  7. #22
    I agree with Erik, you don't want a project. On the other hand, an old slider doesn't have to be a project. It depends on the condition of the unit.

    I worked in a shop with a short stroke slider and a cabinet saw, and a limited appetite for capital investment at the time. When an older Griggio SC3000, same vintage as the saw you are looking at, became available, we bought it for $2k and shoehorned it in place. It performed without incident for several years until it was upgraded to an early 80's Martin T71. They replaced that saw with a new T60C a few years back when they could afford it, but I'm confident that the T71 is still at work in somebody's shop and making money for them- probably true for the Griggio as well.

    Sure, you are taking a risk with an old machine, but that's factored into the price and can be minimized with a thorough inspection. What parts are you likely to need besides belts and bearings? That new T60C will probably need a new electronic board before the old saws wear out their carriage guides. Keep your cabinet saw as a backup and you will have some coverage in case of a problem with the slider.

    There have been a couple of threads in the recent past covering small shop owners in a similar situation to yours. Both wound up with new units, Felders I believe. If you have cash in hand or the prospect of work ahead sufficient to finance a new saw that may well be your best bet. On the other hand, a decent condition used saw may work well for you and keep you out of debt, which is where I like to be.

    In any case, if you really need a sliding table saw, you are already paying for it by working less efficiently. I will say that having worked with cabinet saws, aftermarket sliding table attachments, a short stroke saw, track saw and now a full size slider, there's no way I would go backwards. Good luck with whatever you choose.
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 05-19-2023 at 10:24 AM.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    1,322
    I bought a brand new SI 15 WF same green color as your picture in 1978. It was not a terrible saw but hard to keep square. I ended up selling it and buying a 15 year old Martin T75. SCM went to the tan color about a year later so I would guess the vintage of that one early to mid 70s.
    Would agree that one looks pretty beat.

    The salesmen will always tell you to buy new but I had good luck in the early days of my business buying used industrial machines. Didnít start replacing with new till the 2000s and that was mostly to take advantage of section 179.

    I have totally restored a few vintage machines and agree that is not a good business move. More of a hobby for me. I also have a few vintage machines in service I have not touched and they still preform well and better built than anything new.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    3,891
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Jung View Post
    You're right there, and the immediate answer is that I want a slider, not a project.

    The projects I enjoy are those that are the items that I have space for and no immediate need. Thanks for the reminder.

    On that note I've made my 1942 16" Oliver work for my business, but I had another jointer to use while I waited 18mo for it to be ready to use. And a ~1940 Walker Turner drill press and a 1952 Walker Turner drill press - I already had 2 other drill presses so my business didn't depend on them and they didn't take up much space. Oh and a 1990 SCMI WBS massive project, but I had a big drum sander that got me by while the WBS was getting worked on.
    Sounds like we didn't talk you out of it. Enjoy the project!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •