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Thread: Current draw of planers with Shelix cutterheads

  1. #16
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    What style of breaker is tripping? Those small button style breakers are notoriously unreliable. You might consider installing a replacement to see if thatís the issue.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Whitesell View Post
    My Delta had an "internal" or inheirent (?) depth stop that limited it to 1/16". I never had a problem taking a 12" x 1/16" cut other than the zillion passes it take to turn rough cut into finished lumber. But that is past. Now I need to figure if I just wasted $800 on a shelix head or if there is something I should be looking for within the planer that would explain the high current readings.
    From memory (but I'm pretty sure about it) Jet's JJP-12 straight knife machine's planer feed rate is 20 ft./min. The JJP-12 HH planer feed rate is 12 ft./min., the additional power required by the helical head is why. It is possible to replace a part/parts on the JJP-12 to slow the feed rate to that of the JJP-12HH, I don't know if it would be practical to change parts on the drive train of your machine.

  3. #18
    If your current measurement is correct, then the internal motor overload may be tripping properly. Could be just too much strain with the new cutterhead, in which case a slower feed speed as Curt suggested may be in order, or a more powerful motor, or perhaps there's a problem which a motor shop could diagnose. It's also possible that the internal breaker is bad. You could try replacing it or jumping past it and monitoring the motor for heat buildup.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Combs View Post
    Can I assume you have the clamp on meter around 1 conductor, not two? If so, I'd suspect the meter accuracy.
    A clamp meter will only read if it is around one wire. The measurement around 120V L and N or 240 H1 and H2 is 0A, +A in L or H1 and -A in N or H2. +A-A=0.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keegan Shields View Post
    What style of breaker is tripping? Those small button style breakers are notoriously unreliable. You might consider installing a replacement to see if thatís the issue.
    Motor overload in the control box. I would need to re-disassemble the box to find the manuacturer.

    It is something similar to
    https://www.rockwellautomation.com/e...us-relays.html

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Whitesell View Post
    I am well aware of the math applied to convert volts, amps, power, and horsepower. Using the faceplate to determine HP is a common folly. Based on the faceplate of this motor, it would be 73% efficient. 14FLA, 220V, 73% = 3HP. What about a 3HP motor that has a FLA of 11A on 220V? That means the motor is 93% efficient? So I should install this 11A 220V motor in the planer? The math extrapolates that if 14FLA, 220V, 73% is 3HP, then when the motor draws 19A then the 3HP motor is producing 4HP. Which is not possible. Therein lies the folly of using the math to determine (or even speak of) horsepower.
    Actually there is absolutely no issue with the 3 HP motor producing 4HP, except for the fact that if it does it continuously it will burn out.

    Thatís why motors require overload protection.

    The motor is overloaded due to a less efficient cutter design. This is a known characteristic of some insert heads.

    Regards, Rod

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Whitesell View Post
    A clamp meter will only read if it is around one wire. The measurement around 120V L and N or 240 H1 and H2 is 0A, +A in L or H1 and -A in N or H2. +A-A=0.
    Yep, I was thinking of my 240/3ph and the strange readings if around the 208 and one of the others!

  8. #23
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    Not sure if it helps, but the motor overload protection may be a thermal switch (temperature triggered). Whereas breakers are current triggered (which may still be a thermal effect, but designed to trip at a max current level).

    I have read (and seen youtube video) that Shelix heads DO draw more current than straight knives (on the Dewalt 735)

    Without having the comparison values it is hard to know if binding/alignment issues after disassembly.

    I dont know the accuracy of your meter. If 1% of full scale, that would be +/- 2amps. And you may be trying to read more accurately than that so again hard to say.

    Fact is, it is tripping. And it sounds like it 'might' be due to a higher load due to the change in head. If that breaker is part of the machine, there might not be much to be done without deviating from the manufacturers design limitations (which then becomes a safety risk).
    Last edited by Carl Beckett; 03-31-2023 at 7:20 AM.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Whitesell View Post
    Can you run a 5HP motor from a 220V 20A service?
    No, requires a 30A (if pulling full rated power).

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Beckett View Post
    I dont know the accuracy of your meter. If 1% of full scale, that would be +/- 2amps. And you may be trying to read more accurately than that so again hard to say.
    You detailed what was vauely in my head. Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Beckett View Post
    Without having the comparison values it is hard to know if binding/alignment issues after disassembly.
    Also an item I was considering since the head was very difficult to remove and reinstall. I'm going to pull the infeed and outfeed rollers and see what the current reads with only the cutter head spinning. More than that means disassembling the gearbox, again, and another $30 bottle of gear oil.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Beckett View Post
    No, requires a 30A (if pulling full rated power).
    Correct. A 5HP motor, 240V, single phase with 100% efficiency is a little over 15A. That is idealistic, not going to happen or will happen with very little wiggle room. If you push that number down to 80% efficiency then you're right at 20A, which means you really should be running from a 30A service.

  12. #27
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    No worries. I have a 3HP 220V 11A motor on order. That will give me more overhead before I hit the current overload (set at 15A).
    Last edited by Anthony Whitesell; 03-31-2023 at 2:53 PM.

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