Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 27

Thread: Current draw of planers with Shelix cutterheads

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,751

    Current draw of planers with Shelix cutterheads

    I have changed the cutterhead of my Jet JWP-15CS from the straightblade to the Shelix. Now I am tripping the overload of the planer. I have a Centech clamp on planer and it reads 9A when idle and 17-19A when running 8-10 wide boards taking a 1/16" cut. I wish I knew what it drew prior to the change, even with old blades. The faceplate on the motor lists the FLA at 14. I'm surprised the no load current is 9A of the 14 FLA. Is that what is typically seen? The lowest range of the clamp on meter is 200A () How accurate do you think the Centech clamp on amp meter is?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    3,533
    I thought it was common knowledge that carbide insert heads take more horsepower than straight blades.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,751
    That wording never appeared in my research. Current yes. HP no. In my research, those that measured and provided the differential never had numbers higher than the rating for the machine or the motor. Yes the currennt measurements were higher than the straightblade but not beyond those of the machine (in the case of the converted lunchbox planers) or the FLA of the motors for those that provided data for a floor standing planer.

    The two things that I'm focused on are the 9 amps idle current. Ie., cutting nothing and it draws 9 amps. That seems high to me. Then the 2x increase in current (which goes above and beyond the FLA) when taking a measly 1/16" cut. I wish I could compare to the 12 1/2" Delta straight blade lunch box planer I had previously. All it could do was 1/16" cuts. A 1/8" cut was out of the question for the Delta lunch box planer.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    3,533
    An 1/8" cut is out of the question for nearly every lunch box, and many have issues taking 1/16" at full width.

  5. #5
    That looks like a pretty common Asian planer design. Perhaps you can find one in your area, whether Jet or another brand, and test it. It's interesting to note that a comparable model with a "3hp" motor lists FLA as 11 amps (p.6) https://go.rockler.com/tech/60724_instr.pdf Is there room to replace the motor with a 5hp?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,751
    My Delta had an "internal" or inheirent (?) depth stop that limited it to 1/16". I never had a problem taking a 12" x 1/16" cut other than the zillion passes it take to turn rough cut into finished lumber. But that is past. Now I need to figure if I just wasted $800 on a shelix head or if there is something I should be looking for within the planer that would explain the high current readings.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,751
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    That looks like a pretty common Asian planer design. Perhaps you can find one in your area, whether Jet or another brand, and test it. It's interesting to note that a comparable model with a "3hp" motor lists FLA as 11 amps (p.6) https://go.rockler.com/tech/60724_instr.pdf Is there room to replace the motor with a 5hp?
    It is a closed stand version, with the motor mounted below. So I believe there would be room. Can you run a 5HP motor from a 220V 20A service? The Jet 3HP motor faceplate states 14FLA. A quick search of 3HP motors did not turn up anything with as high a FLA, as you ellude. Perhaps Jet did not use a very efficient motor and another 3HP motor would not have the same current draws.
    Last edited by Anthony Whitesell; 03-27-2023 at 6:22 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,783
    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Whitesell View Post
    It is a closed stand version, with the motor mounted below. So I believe there would be room. Can you run a 5HP motor from a 220V 20A service? The Jet 3HP motor faceplate states 14FLA. A quick search of 3HP motors did not turn up anything with as high a FLA, as you ellude. Perhaps Jet did not use a very efficient motor and another 3HP motor would not have the same current draws.
    If itís a true 5hp, you are going to need a 30 amp circuit (and wire capacity) most likely. I know my prior Minimax 16 saw with 4.8hp required the 30amp. That said, I know some folks ran/run their Minimax bandsaws on 20 amp, but it truly calls for a 30 amp circuit.

    On my DW735 planer, when switching from straight to Shelix, it pulled more amperage on the line. I learned this one day because I was running it on an extension cord that had a built in 15amp circuit breaker and with the Shelix it would trip. When moving to a 20amp circuit with 12 ga cord without the little breaker, it ran fine. I didnít bother putting a meter on the line but it for sure wouldnít run on the 15 amp circuit any more when the bite size got to big or wood type got too hard.

    Iím betting the motor efficiency could be an issue, but seems like I read somewhere about having to take smaller bites on the Shelix heads. Maybe you need to drop down to 1/16Ē max passes. Sorry I canít be of more help, but I do think you are seeing a normal phenomenon with regards to the Shelix needing more power.
    Last edited by Greg Parrish; 03-27-2023 at 7:57 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    235
    If you can replace the cutter head, you can definitely add a 20A circuit...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,783
    Quote Originally Posted by James Jayko View Post
    If you can replace the cutter head, you can definitely add a 20A circuit...
    Not sure if that was directed at me, but I have a shop full of 20amp circuits, along with multiple 220v 20amp circuits. My issue was an inline 15amp breaker installed on the 12ga extension cord by the manufacturer. Using a different cord without it and mine works fine.

    With regards to the OP, his planner appears to be a 220v 3hp motor that is tripping a 20amp circuit now if I'm understanding correctly.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    8,693
    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Whitesell View Post
    That wording never appeared in my research. Current yes. HP no.
    You just did not understand that horsepower is just current times voltage. The voltage should stay constant or very little drop in a normal house with no extension cords. So double the current is double the horsepower.
    The calculator below says you are making 6.1 Hp if the motor was 100% efficient. My pool pump motor is about 60%. efficient. So 60% x 6.1= 3.6 hp
    one horsepower is 746 watts so input horsepower is (amps x volts) / 746
    Bill D.

    https://www.inchcalculator.com/amps-...er-calculator/
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 03-27-2023 at 12:03 PM. Reason: fixed quote tagging

  12. #12
    Can I assume you have the clamp on meter around 1 conductor, not two? If so, I'd suspect the meter accuracy.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,751
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Parrish View Post
    With regards to the OP, his planner appears to be a 220v 3hp motor that is tripping a 20amp circuit now if I'm understanding correctly.
    Close. I have only 20A outlets and distribution breakers servicing my shop. It is not the 20A distribution breaker that is tripping. The 15A motor overload in the control box on the machine is tripping.

    Edit: Next morning thoughts. I'm finding it interesting that the FLA is 14A and the overload is set to 15A. IIRC, there is a 125% rule in the NEC where the overload can be (should be?) 125% of the FLA, in this case set to 17-18A.
    Last edited by Anthony Whitesell; 03-28-2023 at 6:31 AM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,751
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    You just did not understand that horsepower is just current times voltage. The voltage should stay constant or very little drop in a normal house with no extension cords. So double the current is double the horsepower.
    The calculator below says you are making 6.1 Hp if the motor was 100% efficient. My pool pump motor is about 60%. efficient. So 60% x 6.1= 3.6 hp
    one horsepower is 746 watts so input horsepower is (amps x volts) / 746
    Bill D.

    https://www.inchcalculator.com/amps-...er-calculator/
    I am well aware of the math applied to convert volts, amps, power, and horsepower. Using the faceplate to determine HP is a common folly. Based on the faceplate of this motor, it would be 73% efficient. 14FLA, 220V, 73% = 3HP. What about a 3HP motor that has a FLA of 11A on 220V? That means the motor is 93% efficient? So I should install this 11A 220V motor in the planer? The math extrapolates that if 14FLA, 220V, 73% is 3HP, then when the motor draws 19A then the 3HP motor is producing 4HP. Which is not possible. Therein lies the folly of using the math to determine (or even speak of) horsepower.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    8,693
    A decent electyric motor is designed for max efficiency at its stated FLA. It can go above or below that for more or less horsepower. But those amps are usually less efficient. Going below is usually not a problem as long as rpm stays high enough for cooling. Going above FLA will cause overheating. Not a good thing for long time periods. Duty cycle must be considered.
    Bill D.
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 03-27-2023 at 11:25 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •