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Thread: Designing a sewing table for my wife

  1. #1
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    Designing a sewing table for my wife

    I plan to build a 7ft to 7-1/2 ft x 30" sewing table for my wife. I plan to put a set of drawers on one end so she can store her thread etc... Other end would be two legs. Was planning on sitting the top on the drawer stack on the left end and two legs on the right end. Drawer will be @ 30" up to 36" wide and was planning on the two legs to be 4 x 4 to give them some heft. I was planning to use a skirt to give the top some rigidity and start the drawers below the skirt so it would not interfere in their use.

    I normally build drawers bases 24" deep, but with the top being 30" deep, not sure how I want to manage the difference. I don't think it is a good idea to sit the base back 3" in front so it is evenly spaced front to back. Thought having it be 24" and sitting up front would look odd, only practical choice is to build it @30" deep and just don't use all the depth?

    Welcome your suggestions. Thanks Brian
    Brian

  2. #2
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    Here is a work table I designed for a person that does quilting. The cabinet is 30" deep and 72" long 37" high. When the table is extended the work surface is 72 x 60. The drawers are 28" deep and on full extension slides.
    craft_table1.jpgcraft_table2.jpgcraft_table3.jpgcraft_table4.jpg
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 03-22-2023 at 6:52 PM.
    Lee Schierer
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  3. #3
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    I have been through this and am about to do it again. I built a torsion box 3.6 metres long which is totally unsupported end to end and has at least four machines on it permanently with next to no deflection over about 5 years now. I made it with a 3mm MDF internal grid 50mm deep (this is the secret sauce) and it has 6mm MDF one piece skins both fully glued to the internal grid with a timber facing all round. Two people can easily pick it up because it is so light and over the 5 years it has been in use it has remained flat and straight with no change.

    Sewing Room Bench 5.JPG Sewing Room Bench 1.JPG Return On Sewing Room Bench.JPG
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  4. #4
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    I agree making the drawer cab full depth would probably look the best. If you're going to use full extension drawer slides (I would on utility drawers like this) you might as well make the drawers full depth; no one ever regrets a little extra drawer space. Keep in mind that your wife won't be able to sit in front of the drawers (no knee space) so make sure the rest of the table is long enough to suit whatever she will be doing on it while seated.

    4x4 sounds a little chunky to me, but it might be ok visually with the big drawer cab at the other end. I suggest doing some sketches to see if the proportions look right. The apron under the top will offer good mounting support for the legs, but you should probably include a cross rail near the bottom of the legs.

    I'd probably build it so the top and the drawer cab could be separated by removing a few screws or bolts; it would be a lot easier to move that way. Alternatively, you could put legs at each corner and make the drawers a separate, roll around, cabinet.
    --The bad news is: time flies. The good news is: you're the pilot.-- (Michael Altshuler)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul F Franklin View Post
    ...4x4 sounds a little chunky to me...
    WAY too heavy!
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    I built one that is an assemblage of mortis and tenon face frames, plywood, formica, and piano hinges. It is a copy of one that a client had a picture of. When she passed away It was given to my sister who still uses it. I can't find a match on the web. I will get an image from Sis. It is a neat, light, and sturdy design (although without drawers).
    Best Regards, Maurice

  7. #7
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    thanks everyone, much appreciated. Brian
    Brian

  8. #8
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    Paul's suggestion of a separate cabinet is good, left may prove to be the wrong end. The legs should be less diameter than the apron height to look balanced. Tapered from 3" x 3" to 2 1/4" x 2 1/4" would seem good with a 3" apron. If you follow Chris's lead and make a torsion box it will function well. A formica surface and well rounded corners and edges will be appreciated when handling cloth.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    ... well rounded corners and edges will be appreciated when handling cloth.
    I second that.

  10. #10
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    Jul 2010
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    I built a sewing cabinet for my wife in 2016. Note the open storage built into the top. She likes that feature. I believe it adds a lot of stiffness. The removable section of the top is to accommodate an add-on embroidery unit.

    Sewing.jpg

    This is a rather large cabinet, with two work positions on opposite sides.

  11. #11
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    J--nice job.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  12. #12
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    Jay that looks good. It seems well lit except for the hard shadow right in the wrong place, under the machine. Does the machine have lighting? If not it seems like a good place to add something.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    Does the machine have lighting?
    Thanks! The machine does indeed have effective lighting.

  14. #14
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    Jay...nice setup for your wife and a nice Bernina machine. The thread drawer is nice with room for thread and bobbins.

    My wife has Bernina long arm and they make great machines. She can not complain about the cost of tools as her Husqvarna and Bernina cost more than my tools.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Frank View Post
    Jay...nice setup for your wife and a nice Bernina machine. The thread drawer is nice with room for thread and bobbins.

    My wife has Bernina long arm and they make great machines. She can not complain about the cost of tools as her Husqvarna and Bernina cost more than my tools.
    Thanks! There are 3 Bernina machines in my wifeís sewing room, including a long arm for quilting. Iím pretty sure she has more invested there than I have in my shop. It provides cover for a lot of tool purchases.

    To be fair, the quality and quantity of her work is greater than mine.

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