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Thread: What 10 sliding saws should I consider?

  1. #1
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    What 10 sliding saws should I consider?

    Im about to pull the trigger on a slider. I must have at least 8 travel, but really want 10. We have contact with a salesperson at Felder. I am seeing Makisawa has something at a lower price, but I know nothing about them. I know Laguna also makes a slider. The object of this post is mainly to discover what brands I should be looking at, and what experience you have with them.

    *** I really want single phase, because 3 phase is going to cost me too much to install.

  2. #2
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    If you can wait I suggest going to the AWFS in Vegas. You will be able see and touch many different ones.
    Steve Jenkins, McKinney, TX. 469 742-9694
    Always use the word "impossible" with extreme caution

  3. #3
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    Don't buy the 8 foot Felder slider. It is basically a 7 foot table with a 1 foot half-size extension. Most people are disappointed when they get it. The 9 foot or longer tables are fine.

    Maksiwa is another Asian import brand like Laguna or Grizzly. I don't know much about them, but I suspect they will have the same general Asian machine quality.

    If you are looking at Maksiwa, then you are at the lower cost point. The SCM/Minimax is another option.
    Last edited by Aaron Inami; 03-20-2023 at 12:57 PM.

  4. #4
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    Take a look at MiniMax. I have a smaller one and really like it.

  5. #5
    I would far rather have a used Altendorf or Martin in good shape than any one of the saws previously mentioned. For example https://www.facebook.com/marketplace...1-2c9824df8716 A rotary phase converter need not be that costly and allows for accessing industrial machinery.
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 03-20-2023 at 1:59 PM.

  6. #6
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    I agree w Steve and Kevin. Go to a trade show and see them in person. Seeing a new, e.g. Martin, may get you looking for a good used one. Good luck w your decision...

  7. #7
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    What’s your target budget ?

    What’s your use case ? Hobbyist doesn’t really need Martin quality but an operation running a skid of sheetgoods a day , everyday will realize the xtra spend.


    They’re a BIG price differential between a new Makisawa and a new Felder or SCMi saw. And an even bigger jump to Altendorf and especially Martin.

  8. #8
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    SCM/MiniMax S315WS
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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    AWFS July 25-28 Las Vegas

  10. #10
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    Typical sliding table saw weight: 1500-1600 lbs (i.e. Maksiwa, typical Felder, Minimax, etc.)

    Step up: 1900 lbs (Felder K940s / Kappa). More rigid chassis/frame.

    Step up: Altendorf WA80 / F45 or SCM Nova (about 2200 lbs).

    Top end: stuff like Martin and upper end SCM, typically 2800+ lbs. These typically have oversized cast iron tables on the rip side of the blade in addition to a much sturdier platform.

  11. #11
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    Malcolm, if this is for primarily for panels have a look at a vertical saw as they have lots of advantages over a panel slider saw. They take up less floor space, are easier to load etc. They are usually more expensive but with the floor space that is saved a short stroke slider would work for smaller stuff.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  12. #12
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    Malcolm,

    Not close, but this just popped up on FB marketplace in Spokane WA:
    https://www.facebook.com/marketplace...tory_type=post

    Would need a VFD.
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  13. #13
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    I appreciate all the replies- sorry for the delayed response, as I was building wood racks all day, and celebrating my daughter’s birthday!

    This is for a bespoke furniture shop. We mostly make one-off creations. We needed a saw with high accuracy and like the idea of a large slider not just for sheet goods, but for straight cutting edges on rough sawn lumber, and cross-cutting. I am planning to build a number of large chopping block tables as a regular moneymaker. I also will be building a lot of doors. The main reason for the 10’ slider for me is I would use it to straighten edges more than I would sheet goods, but for sure I want to be able to run 8’ sheet goods and 8’ lumber as a minimum. I found when I worked in a shop making mostly doors that I used the full 10’ very often. We have a lot of potential customers needing custom-made doors for historic homes which typically have very tall doors- 9’ isn’t unusual.

    Accuracy is everything. We pride ourselves on high level of perfection, and it is part of our value sell. This is probably the most important deciding factor: dead-on repeatable accuracy. Mark used a Felder when studying in England and I am familiar with them as well, which is why we reached out to them. Forgive me, as I don’t have the info in front of me, but I believe the model we are considering is the K500S with 10’ slider. This is just an example of where our mind is and what we are considering, but again the post is to make sure I have considered all options before I buy.

    Budget is up to $12,500.

    Since we are now back in the US, a standard arbor would be preferred over metric, only because of availability of blades. We actually prefer to use metric and wish our beloved country would just get on board with that. I would prefer not to have to special order blades and replace my dado set. It wouldn’t be a deal breaker, however, if the right saw had a metric arbor.

    There is a used Altendorf nearby that I will inquire about- not sure if it is single phase. The building we are in has 3 phase available, but to run it to our shop would cost almost as much as the saw. I do not want to deal with a phase converter. I am happy with 5hp single phase. I don’t do high enough production to justify the cost of running the three phase. Mostly not doing anything over 8/4 except when I trim the ends of the chopping block tables and I’m ok with going slow and multiple passes for those.

    I really appreciate the replies- all have been very helpful.

  14. #14
    If I had the space I would have a Martin. As is, I have a Paoloni 260, whose footprint works in my shop. I would say it is comparable in build quality to Mini Max or Felder 500 series. It is quite accurate but not heavy duty. Compared to a Martin it's more lightly built and the adjustments, the crosscut fence lock for instance, are more easily disturbed. I keep an eye out for that sort of thing and it works well for me. A Martin is designed to be used every day for decades in a factory setting while maintaining its accuracy and adjustment. In your situation a Felder or MiniMax should do fine although I would look closely at the differences between that series and the upscale models.

    I'm a believer in buying used for value as most machines are kits which require some kinks to be worked out. If I can lay my hands and inspection tools on a machine in service I have more confidence in it than hoping the qc on a new unit is ok and there is a meaningful warranty. There are some used Felders on Woodweb and Facebook Marketplace now that might be worth looking at.

    I get wanting to stick with single phase supply. I used to feel the same. I will say though that with my preference for used gear I should have started out with a phase converter instead of waiting 30 years. You are not likely to find a single phase Altendorf. Variable frequency drives are another alternative for individual machines, especially good when you want speed control.

    Whatever you get, since accuracy and repeatability are important, think about getting digital readouts on both the crosscut and rip fences. They will pay off in short order in a busy shop.

    Good luck with the new venture, sounds exciting.
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 03-21-2023 at 11:43 AM.

  15. #15
    Malcolm, Another plug for RPC. I did start with one 45 years ago and have 22 machines connected. I have never needed to replace any motors.

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