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Thread: Growth ring contest

  1. #1

    Growth ring contest

    Some offcuts of DF construction lumber. 6x6 and 6x8- over 70 growth rings per inch.

    IMG_4011.jpeg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    So Cal
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    Thatís a good one. I offer this for your consideration Alaskan yellow cedar. This was a great board.
    I think your fir beats mine.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Aj

  3. #3
    That Doug fir would quickly become, not construction lumber in my shop. Very nice.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by John Kananis View Post
    That Doug fir would quickly become, not construction lumber in my shop. Very nice.
    I measured the rings on a scrap, but there's a 6x8x8' piece of the same stuff. Heavy!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    I once reclaimed some fir from a house built in the 1920s it was similar the old growth wood you have except it was very dry. I remember it to be extra stable it had no stress of fight left in it.
    I built a hall table and entered it in woodworking competition.I donít remember what I placed but got lots of compliments.
    Here a pic.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Aj

  6. #6
    Andrew, That is a gorgeous table. Jack

  7. #7
    Yes, beautiful table. The piece I have is also dry- indoors since 2006. There is also some 4x12 with 40 rings/inch, and redwood 6x6s with 50 rings/inch. Hope to make a bench from the 4x12.

  8. #8
    Garrett Hack would be all over that stuff. He uses lots of df in his furniture.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
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    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    I once reclaimed some fir from a house built in the 1920s it was similar the old growth wood you have except it was very dry. I remember it to be extra stable it had no stress of fight left in it.
    I built a hall table and entered it in woodworking competition.I don’t remember what I placed but got lots of compliments.
    Here a pic.
    Andrew, If you did not get first place shame on the judges. It is lovely!

    I have some reclaimed bits of 100+ year old construction lumber, some that was buried until recently. I have to get a jewelers loupe to count the rings, then figure out how to take a picture...
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 03-18-2023 at 8:24 PM.
    Missouri, Where the Walnut trees grow straight, tall, and gigantic. Therefore, it's not that bad.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    I remember reading in Smithsonian magazine in the 1980's about trees in Canada that were puzzling scientists because they had no growth rings. Turns out they just needed more magnification. These were small trees about the size of a baseball bat.

    Ontario's oldest trees - Ontario's old growth forests

    White Cedar Thuja occidentalis 1316 Niagara Escarpment Dwarfed cliff cedar, germinated 688 AD. Kelly and Larson 2004, Kelly and Larson 2007, Larson 2005. Photo
    1890 Niagara Escarpment This ancient cliff cedar had been dead for centuries but was preserved under a rock overhang. 1567 rings were counted, estimated age 1890 years. Larson 2001, Larson 2005, Kelly and Larson 2007
    1653 Niagara Escarpment 1653 rings were counted on a dead trunk. This is the longest complete ring count on an ancient cedar in Ontario. Kelly and Larson 2007
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 03-18-2023 at 8:34 PM. Reason: the Niagara Escarpment Cedars
    Missouri, Where the Walnut trees grow straight, tall, and gigantic. Therefore, it's not that bad.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
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    I bought some Sitka spruce from Aircraft Supply in ‘78 that had 130 rings per inch. I have some Western Red Cedar here now with about 45/inch which seems like old growth gold now.

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    Wayland, MA
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    I recently acquired several DF boards with vertical grain and ring counts similar to what you show. Definitely didn't pay construction lumber prices for it! I'm in the process of building organ pipes from it. I'm wondering about its properties as a soundboard or guitar top. Spruce, whether Sitka or norther European, seems to be the standard; not sure I've ever seen a guitar with a DF top. Are the acoustic properties a lot different? It sure looks great.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
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    1,165
    Nice work Andrew!

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    I once reclaimed some fir from a house built in the 1920s it was similar the old growth wood you have except it was very dry. I remember it to be extra stable it had no stress of fight left in it.
    I built a hall table and entered it in woodworking competition.I don’t remember what I placed but got lots of compliments.
    Here a pic.

  15. #15
    Andrew, I didn't notice the pics at first, nicely done. I especially like the "Maloof-type" details in some of the joinery and the ogee design in the retention rail (proper term?) running the outside perimeter of the top.

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