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Thread: 15 year old craftsman profession table saw won't stay parallel to slot.

  1. #1

    15 year old craftsman profession table saw won't stay parallel to slot.

    I am just a hobbyist, and this saw has served my needs over the years. Starting to have trouble getting it to stay set once I get it parallel to the slot over the last year. Spending way too much time messing with it.

    Last attempt. I even purchased a calibration disk to make sure it wasn't the blade. I have a digital i-gaging tool to check with. Checked the arbor first. At most maybe .0005 out if that. Adjusted the play underneath with the tilt to make sure it wasn't under tension. Loosened the stop nut, handle turns reasonably freely, reset the stop nut on the tilt mechanism. Loosened all four bolts to the top way to loose. Adjusted the top so the slot was parallel within .0005. Left the dial indicator on and tightened all the bolts down and the .0005 had not moved. Then I set the fence parallel to within .0005 to the backside slot.

    Used the saw to make a few parallel and crosscuts this morning, and the saw shows .003 out of parallel with the slot. I didn't bump into the saw, etc...

    This is what has been happening lately, I get it set up, make a few cuts and I can either see/hear the backside of the blade cutting on rip cuts or parallel cuts.

    Can't figure out what is causing it to move?

    Thanks for nay help.

    Brian
    Brian

  2. #2
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    Wonder if the bolts have been overtightened at some time and yielded? Maybe replace the bolts? Although thinking a bit more, the bolts, I assume, thread into the cast iron top which would be weaker than the bolts so maybe the threads in the top are damaged? Loctite might help. Maybe someone with more machinery experience can offer better comments.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    Wonder if the bolts have been overtightened at some time and yielded? Maybe replace the bolts? Although thinking a bit more, the bolts, I assume, thread into the cast iron top which would be weaker than the bolts so maybe the threads in the top are damaged? Loctite might help. Maybe someone with more machinery experience can offer better comments.
    I can replace the bolts and see what happens. Thanks brian

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    Wonder if the bolts have been overtightened at some time and yielded? Maybe replace the bolts? Although thinking a bit more, the bolts, I assume, thread into the cast iron top which would be weaker than the bolts so maybe the threads in the top are damaged? Loctite might help. Maybe someone with more machinery experience can offer better comments.
    Retap the bolt holes in the top for a slightly larger bolt? If that's the problem, that is.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Jayko View Post
    Retap the bolt holes in the top for a slightly larger bolt? If that's the problem, that is.
    I was thinking the same thing, assuming the next bolt size has the same threads per inch. Might be worth trying new bolts and Loctite before retapping the holes.

  6. #6
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    When I first aligned my Craftsman table saw I noted that when I tightened the bolts under the table that the saw would move back almost to where it started. What I discovered is that the star type lock washers were sliding back into the indentations in the cast aluminum trunions. By rotating the lock washers slightly, I was able to stop that movement.

    Another way to insure the saw doesn't move after adjustments is to use a set of P.A.L.S to hold the trunions in place. Sort of a belt and suspenders method of alignment.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA '71
    Go Navy!

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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    When I first aligned my Craftsman table saw I noted that when I tightened the bolts under the table that the saw would move back almost to where it started. What I discovered is that the star type lock washers were sliding back into the indentations in the cast aluminum trunions. By rotating the lock washers slightly, I was able to stop that movement.

    Another way to insure the saw doesn't move after adjustments is to use a set of P.A.L.S to hold the trunions in place. Sort of a belt and suspenders method of alignment.
    Lee my saw is a professional model with an enclosed base. Don't think it will work on my model. Thanks Brian

  8. #8
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    Sounds like your saw is one of the "zip code" saws; a 22124, 22114, etc. These are indeed cabinet mounted trunnions. I have had a couple and they are great little saws. If the settings are changing on this type of saw and the top is tight to the cabinet I would look to the trunnion mounts. Remove the fence rails and remove the top (keep track of the washer counts and positions as this affects tilt angle alignment) to check the trunnion hardware. Fortunately on this type of saw this is a fairly easy operation. Inspect the trunnion mounting locations and castings for anything loose or damaged. If all is well and you re-mount the top and re-align it there should be nothing to move and therefor come out of alignment. Is the saw mobile? Moving a tablesaw and setting it down on an uneven floor can alter the alignment. Just tossing things out there.
    “The life so short, the craft so long to learn.” --Hippocrates

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Sounds like your saw is one of the "zip code" saws; a 22124, 22114, etc. These are indeed cabinet mounted trunnions. I have had a couple and they are great little saws. If the settings are changing on this type of saw and the top is tight to the cabinet I would look to the trunnion mounts. Remove the fence rails and remove the top (keep track of the washer counts and positions as this affects tilt angle alignment) to check the trunnion hardware. Fortunately on this type of saw this is a fairly easy operation. Inspect the trunnion mounting locations and castings for anything loose or damaged. If all is well and you re-mount the top and re-align it there should be nothing to move and therefor come out of alignment. Is the saw mobile? Moving a tablesaw and setting it down on an uneven floor can alter the alignment. Just tossing things out there.
    Glenn, I plan on replacing bolts washer and star washer to see if this helps. Hate pulling the top. Check trunnion hardware for? Loose or damaged bolts? Thanks brian

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    When I first aligned my Craftsman table saw I noted that when I tightened the bolts under the table that the saw would move back almost to where it started. What I discovered is that the star type lock washers were sliding back into the indentations in the cast aluminum trunions. By rotating the lock washers slightly, I was able to stop that movement.
    This is why the internet exists. I'd never think of this, and spend 10 hours banging my head against the wall.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Is the saw mobile? Moving a tablesaw and setting it down on an uneven floor can alter the alignment. Just tossing things out there.
    I had the same problem with my old Ridgid saw with the granite top. I would get everything dialed in and the next time I would check it, the alignment was off. Finally figured out it was moving it around in the garage that did it.

  12. #12
    Manual said the bolts were an M10, they were in fact an M8 and what box stores had was different threads per inch. Replaced the washers, we'll see. Brian

  13. #13
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    Looks like the M8 PALS are out of stock but if you could source some M8 threaded rod (or cut the heads off some bolts), looks like an easy DIY to make your own.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Runau View Post
    Glenn, I plan on replacing bolts washer and star washer to see if this helps. Hate pulling the top. Check trunnion hardware for? Loose or damaged bolts? Thanks brian
    Sorry Brian. We sometimes don't realize we are being a little vague until we go back and read our own blathering . Yes, I was thinking from your description that a casting area (probably around the mounting bolts but possible at the arbor) may be cracked. Creeping misalignment always has me looking to casting integrity first. We align things and tighten them and all is well for a period of time. Then the crack widens or the failure continues and the misalignment returns. Does that make sense?
    “The life so short, the craft so long to learn.” --Hippocrates

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Sorry Brian. We sometimes don't realize we are being a little vague until we go back and read our own blathering . Yes, I was thinking from your description that a casting area (probably around the mounting bolts but possible at the arbor) may be cracked. Creeping misalignment always has me looking to casting integrity first. We align things and tighten them and all is well for a period of time. Then the crack widens or the failure continues and the misalignment returns. Does that make sense?
    Yes, thanks again. Brian

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