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Thread: Bore into end grain

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    715
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Engelhardt View Post
    Not true!
    Using a Milescraft Drill Mate as I mentioned & linked to above (or the crazy expensive Woodpecker's) will allow you to use one.
    Yes, but Iíd prefer to just use a guide block and a drill. I donít really want a drill press alternative in the shop. I donít often need precision boring into pieces that donít fit on the drill press.

    Plus, no offense to the Woodpecker fans, but Iíve never felt the urge to pay their prices ó although their tools are visually appealing and probably work quite well. Kind of a Bridge City Syndrome.
    Last edited by Bob Jones 5443; 03-16-2023 at 12:39 PM.

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Jones 5443 View Post
    Iíve been coming around to that, as it would ensure no face-to-face misalignment. Iíve also considering screwing guide block to the two outside boards to also eliminate side-to-side movement while I drill. I think thatís what Iíll settle on.

    Using a drilling guide (DIY or bought) means I canít use a Forstner bit (shaft is narrower than cutting head), but my brad points are pretty sharp. Worst case, I buy a new bit for the end grain. With this method Iíll get a preview of how the bit does in the same end grain before I go into the work piece.

    To get the shank holes on the guide, Iíll hold the part in a Jorgensen hand screw and lock the hand screw down to the table.

    Thanks, everyone!
    If you're dead set on a forstner bit, drill your guide hole to the shank of the forstner bit. Cut out a recess at the "output" side of the drill guide with a bandsaw or something. Thread the forstner through the guide, then clamp it to the drill. Last, push the guide block up against your workpiece. The forstner will be trapped between the guide and the workpiece and will be guided by the block the same way.

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Bert McMahan View Post
    If you're dead set on a forstner bit, drill your guide hole to the shank of the forstner bit. Cut out a recess at the "output" side of the drill guide with a bandsaw or something. Thread the forstner through the guide, then clamp it to the drill. Last, push the guide block up against your workpiece. The forstner will be trapped between the guide and the workpiece and will be guided by the block the same way.
    Plunge router, guide bushing with up cut spiral bit, easy peazy!

  4. #19
    Kent answered your question. If you are worried about your brad point learn how to sharpen them. We were taught to make brad points out of regular twist drills and they cut excellent but a bit of skill as you are making a bit instead of sharpening an already made bit. If you have lots to drill then do Kents set up and put hardened drill bushings in.

  5. #20
    Forstner bits are basically very short (1/2" or so) bits and can be used to make holes with a gentle curve if you put radial pressure on the bit as you drill. For this application, it's probably fine, but for a deeper hole, I would prefer a bit with a longer dimension to aid in keeping the hole straight.

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