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Thread: Bore into end grain

  1. #1
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    Bore into end grain

    Hereís one that probably makes the rounds here from time to time.

    To make a second guitar stand, I need to bore two 1/4Ē holes, only about 3/4Ē deep or so, into the end grain of a (42Ē long) 5/4 bubinga board ó the vertical arm of the base. Into these will go threaded inserts for attaching the standís base to its vertical arm from below.

    The last time I used mahogany and it was a struggle. Iíd like to use the drill press if possible. The drill press table rotates, but it doesnít swing out of the way of the quill and bit. The head does not swivel. And even with a full-height floor mounted drill press, the table wonít go down far enough to mount the arm vertically. So, I could not figure out how to use a sturdy drill press setup.

    I wound up using a Forstner bit in a corded hand drill, with the board propped up and clamped down on the bench and the drill supported to come horizontally into the board. I didnít like the imprecision of this setup. The end grain still gave me more resistance than Iíd like, and I was barely able to push the drill in a straight line. I hesitate to return to that setup with bubinga, which I think is a harder species.

    Iím now wishing I could use my plunge router and my mortise jig (Young Je, YouTube ó you know the one?). I suspect this would make the holes easy to bore. But my bench (and its vise) isnít 42Ē off the floor.

    But am I missing some drill press wisdom? Is there a way to clamp a 7/8Ēx5Ēx42Ē board endwise onto a drill press?

    Or something else I havenít considered?

  2. #2
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    A dowel jig with a sharp brad point bit would be easy and accurate.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Bore a 1/4" hole through a block about 2" thick on your drill press. clamp this on the end of your bubinga board and use it with a hand drill like a big doweling jig. The pilot hole keeps things square:

    https://paulsellers.com/2022/06/maki...ill-bit-guide/

    Or buy a commercial drill guide block:

    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Somewhere in the Land of Lincoln
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    Same basic idea as has already been suggested. I have a dowel jig similar to the one linked. Mine doesn't have inserts as I recall but handles large(thick) stock. As was said with a sharp brad point drill bit it should be a breeze.

    https://www.amazon.com/Eagle-America...794343&sr=8-18

  5. #5
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    I'd probably use my Drill Guide for this type of thing.
    Lay it flat so it can be drill horizontally and clamp enough wood on both sides of the board so you have a good flat surface wide enough to support the guide.

    You could always get all sorts of crazy and use the Woodpecker's version.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  6. #6
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    Thanks, folks. Youíve given my creativity a nudge.

    I like the idea of the Kreg drill guide, but I wonder how it will seat on a 0.835Ē thick board. I think Iíll merge that concept with Robís first suggestion and make a block of my own with a generous 0.85Ē dado on the bottom. I have a block of maple or ash around here somewhereÖ

    Love the Creek. Iíve been away for some time as my hobby time has turned to guitar, and the arrival of grandchildren has slowly taken over my garage shop space!

    Wish me luck with clearing things out and building the stand!

  7. #7
    Use two pieces of plywood, fastened at right angles to each other. On one, bore a hole for router bushing, and use other leg to clamp jig to board. Use plunge router with up cut spiral bit and bore holes.

  8. #8
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    Just clamp boards on either side to give you the width you need for a solid base

  9. #9
    Okay, here's another suggestion. I recently extended a walking stick by six inches. I needed to fashion a round piece of wood with a bore for a 1/4" threaded rod. I knew that I couldn't drill a 6" hole that would stay centered in the wood. Instead, I took the wood for the extention, split it in half and made two 1/8" x 6" dados in it and glued it together. I installed the extension and then shaped it to match the rest of the stick. Anyway, it's a way for you to create a custom drilling guide.

  10. #10
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    The Maker spirit is alive and well in this thread.

  11. #11
    You don't have to make a dado- just cut an inch or so off the board (assuming it's long enough), then drill guide holes in that on your drill press. Set it back on your "actual use" piece, then clamp it in place with a couple pieces around the wide sides of the board. By using the actual board as your guide piece, you know it's exactly the same thickness so you don't have to worry about getting the dado perfectly centered in another piece of stock.

  12. #12
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    I'd use on of the Big Gator drill guides,https://www.amazon.com/Big-Gator-Too...NsaWNrPXRydWU=
    Just shim it level and, as advised earlier, use a sharp brad point bit.

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    Bore a 1/4" hole through a block about 2" thick on your drill press
    HAH! Dead on target

    I have 4 blocks about 6" long and 1-1/2" or 2" square. Used for other tasks as main purpose. BUT - each of them has several holes drilled through, with diameter scribbled beside them.

    I have a Nova Voyager drill press, and there is nothing it cannot do. But, sometimes the target is too unwieldy, sometimes the operator is too doggone lazy to leave the bench, sometimes its only one or two holes in a non-critical application. The blocks get used often.
    "No matter where you go, there you are." - Buckaroo Banzai

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bert McMahan View Post
    You don't have to make a dado- just cut an inch or so off the board (assuming it's long enough), then drill guide holes in that on your drill press. Set it back on your "actual use" piece, then clamp it in place with a couple pieces around the wide sides of the board. By using the actual board as your guide piece, you know it's exactly the same thickness so you don't have to worry about getting the dado perfectly centered in another piece of stock.
    Iíve been coming around to that, as it would ensure no face-to-face misalignment. Iíve also considering screwing guide block to the two outside boards to also eliminate side-to-side movement while I drill. I think thatís what Iíll settle on.

    Using a drilling guide (DIY or bought) means I canít use a Forstner bit (shaft is narrower than cutting head), but my brad points are pretty sharp. Worst case, I buy a new bit for the end grain. With this method Iíll get a preview of how the bit does in the same end grain before I go into the work piece.

    To get the shank holes on the guide, Iíll hold the part in a Jorgensen hand screw and lock the hand screw down to the table.

    Thanks, everyone!

  15. #15
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    Using a drilling guide (DIY or bought) means I can’t use a Forstner bit
    Not true!
    Using a Milescraft Drill Mate as I mentioned & linked to above (or the crazy expensive Woodpecker's) will allow you to use one.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

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