Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 41

Thread: What crosscut configuration do you use?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Location
    Israel
    Posts
    294

    What crosscut configuration do you use?

    Hi all,

    Im trying to round out my basic kit and need to get a crosscut saw. The rule of 6-7 ppi in the cut seems to make theoretical sense to me when you are talking about 4/4 lumber and thinner. 8/4 would suggest a 3ppi saw! I was w9ndering what crosscut hand saws (or panal saws you all use most, and specifically whats your favorite for thicker boards?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    608
    I've got a Sandvik hand saw, cross cut, I think around 7 ppi, I don't remember. I'm far from my workshop at the moment.

    The plate is thicker than other vintage hand saws I have.

    I got it as NOS, it's a very aggressive saw and I've used it to cut 2" and thicker stock. It works really well.

    Similar to this one, but just to give you an idea, I don't remember the model number.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress...dsaw-for-sale/

  3. #3
    I use an 8 point saw for crosscutting. The two hand saws in the Seaton Chest (1796) are 5 rip and 8 crosscut.These are adequate for a cabinetmaker. The six teeth rule is not historical or practical. i use a 5 1/2 rip saw for stuff between 1/4 in thick and 4 inches thick.

    Holtzapffel (1848) lists quite a wide range of saws, but says that most workmen have only two or three. Of course most doctors have fifteen or more.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    8,043
    I use handsaws a lot. Crosscuts:

    house framing- 7 point if it won't cut a 2x4 in five strokes it needs to be sharpened

    general purpose- 8 point things like handrails and shingle ridge

    siding and interior trim- 10 point

    inside hardwood, things like oak treads to fit between skirt boards- 12 point

    edited to add: forgot the picture of my 1975 made saw box. Both boxes are full, and the saw cutting shingles is the one that gets left out all the time.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Tom M King; 03-01-2023 at 1:37 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Camarillo, CA
    Posts
    347
    Mine is 11 ppi, 22 inch. It works fine for breaking down stock. I could see the appeal of getting something with larger teeth if you are working with a lot of 8/4 or 12/4 stuff.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
    Posts
    2,791
    My hand saws are 5PPI Rip and 8PPI Crosscut. If I need to break down stock thicker than 1" nominal I rely on electrons.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    11,518
    Leftovers, ready for work .JPG
    The one on the left is a D-112, 7ppi..the one on the right is a D8, 5-1/2ppi....All my No.4 backsaws are 9ppi...The D-8 Panel saw is a 10ppi..

    Seems to work for me quite well.
    Tool Chest Tour, ready rack, saws.JPG
    The Bishop No. 10 has two different tooth counts..one rip, one for cross cut...Jackson is a 11 ppi, I think...
    Last edited by steven c newman; 03-01-2023 at 12:13 PM.
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    26,312
    Blog Entries
    1
    As Tom posted, it depends on the work and how smooth the cut needs to be.

    A low ppi will give a rougher cut. This is fine if Rail Road ties are being cut for the edging of a flower bed.

    For various uses my crosscut saws run from 6ppi to 12ppi.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    613
    Assaf,

    Iíve never heard of a 3ppi crosscut saw. Youíre probably thinking rip, and Iíve only seen a few of those. I have a D7 4ppi rip that eats wood like sharks at a feeding frenzy. My crosscuts range from 7-11ppi, with a 10ppi no-set Acme 120 for super smooth cuts. But unless itís only a few cuts or I feel the need for a workout, I use tailed devices.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Location
    Israel
    Posts
    294
    if you plan on cleaning up the saw marks with a plane, how much does the roughness of the cut matter? i.e does a rough cut saw leave significantly more work than a fine cut?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Camarillo, CA
    Posts
    347
    I think cutting square and close to your line with a saw makes a much bigger difference in clean-up time than tooth count does.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    26,312
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Assaf Oppenheimer View Post
    if you plan on cleaning up the saw marks with a plane, how much does the roughness of the cut matter? i.e does a rough cut saw leave significantly more work than a fine cut?
    One of the factors to cause a rough cut is the set of the saw's teeth. Typically the lower the ppi of a saw the more set. This leaves larger valleys and hills to smooth after the cut.

    Another component of a rough cut is splintering. This can be reduced by knifing all around the cut.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    608
    Quote Originally Posted by Assaf Oppenheimer View Post
    if you plan on cleaning up the saw marks with a plane, how much does the roughness of the cut matter? i.e does a rough cut saw leave significantly more work than a fine cut?
    In this picture, I cut off the ends of a live edge coffee table I gave to friends, American cherry wood. I'm pretty sure I used my Sandvik saw, not the table saw, burn marks would have been left behind, but I'm not 100% sure.

    In any case, these are matched pieces, the left side is the waste, the right side looked the same, it was planed with a no. 4 smoother. A Bailey pattern, with an OEM iron and prepared cap iron. The operation took only a few minutes. On other projects the no. 4 did the job quickly as well.

    The wood species matter, of course. I've a white oak test piece, very dry. The end grain is very difficult to plane.

    20220925_231019.jpg

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    8,043
    I can't think of anything I cut with a handsaw that is planned to be cleaned up later. If I'm cutting it with a handsaw, it's a finished cut.
    Last edited by Tom M King; 03-01-2023 at 4:13 PM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    608
    Through dovetails?

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •