Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 41

Thread: Glue brush discovery.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
    Posts
    2,790

    Glue brush discovery.

    Like many, I go through acid brushes pretty regularly using them to apply glue. I always need to prep them first by trimming the bristles and tightening the crimp that holds them in. Still, bristles fall out and theyíre essentially a one use brush.

    I was watching a video by Ishitani Furniture a while back and he was using toothbrushes. I happened to have a new brush that was inadvertently purchased with the wrong bristle stiffness so I gave it a whirl. They really work nice. The bristles hold a fair bit of glue and have enough stiffness to spread a nice controlled film. They wash up well too.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  2. #2
    I have never understood using those metal brushes which shed hairs for glue. They are great for really nasty stuff (grease, acid, oil, silicone, etc.), but for glue? Maybe epoxy I guess Ė thatís pretty nasty.

    For white glue, yellow glue, hot or liquid hide glue, I use regular art paint brushes. They can be had for almost as cheap as the metal brushes, but they are VASTLY higher quality. They donít shed. You can cut the wood handle to whatever length you want. They come in a billion sizes (just get a variety pack and you are good for any situation). They clean up in the sink very easily and the bristles donít get messed up when you do. And they are DURABLE. In fact, Iíve been using the same two brushes for three or four years now! Thatís a total cost of, um, 40 cents? And one of them was already used as a paint brush before I snatched it up (before I met my wife, she used to like to paint Ė so really, these were free to me). They are also much more precise for getting into difficult spots or when you canít have any glue getting where it shouldnít go.
    glue brushes.jpg

  3. #3
    I agree Chris 100%. I think the ones you have pictured are the ones I use. Walmart has a better selection than Dollar General. I use brushes for acrylic paint. they clean in water. If you are using Titebond 1 even if you forget and it hardens on the brush just stich in a gar of water over overnight Ans it will be as good as new Titebond 11 takes a little longer but it can be done. I no not know about 111 , never tried it.

    Tom
    Tom

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    12,298
    Might sound crazy but I sometimes use these to apply and spread glue, Titebond and epoxy. They have flexible silicone “brush”, no bristles to come out. Glue does stick to them.

    When I use acid brushes I always trim off the ends with scissors. I sometimes recrimp the metal holder and put s few drops of CA glue in the end.

    I like the acid brushes for cleaning dust and fibers out of carvings and woodturning textures, dirt and grease from threads, brush paint and wax, etc. into fine detail an textures, clean and condition detail in leather on saddles and such. For all these I trim the bristles quite short (for stiffness), and at an angle of maybe 10 or 20-deg. I keep these brushes in two sizes. I use them less for wood glue than other things.

    JKJ

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    McKean, PA
    Posts
    15,030
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    Like many, I go through acid brushes pretty regularly using them to apply glue. I always need to prep them first by trimming the bristles and tightening the crimp that holds them in. Still, bristles fall out and they’re essentially a one use brush.

    I was watching a video by Ishitani Furniture a while back and he was using toothbrushes. I happened to have a new brush that was inadvertently purchased with the wrong bristle stiffness so I gave it a whirl. They really work nice. The bristles hold a fair bit of glue and have enough stiffness to spread a nice controlled film. They wash up well too.
    I've been using retired tooth brushes in the shop for many years to spread glue and other purposes. You can spread glue along long lengths of joint without having any glue run down the side of the piece. You can get a nice even spread across the edge of a board. After each use I place them in a container with some water. The next day or so I remove them from the water, whack them on the side of my shop sink and place them on the back of the sink for their next use. You can also cut them with a fine tooth hand saw to spread glue in tight places. I use them when doing repairs on the lawn mower to clean off grease gunk. I retire ones that get too beat up or that I forget to put in the water bath after use. A fresh supply shows up every few months.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 02-27-2023 at 7:25 PM.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA '71
    Go Navy!

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
    Posts
    2,078
    I like all of these ideas! Another is a little clipping from an old paint roller stapled to a stick. Credit: The Gouegon Bros.
    Missouri, Where the Walnut trees grow straight, tall, and gigantic. Therefore, it's not that bad.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    11,515
    Have gone through 2 bags ( 36 each) of those acid brushes....and have yet to see any wayward bristles wandering around...may I ask what are you doing to them?
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
    Posts
    3,335
    I've been using these bridled glue brushes for years. The main one, a medium size, has been in at least weekly use (and some weeks almost continuous use) for upwards of 15 years now and is still going strong. It had gotten a bit short, so I recently "unbridled" it, and expect another decade or two of use. The big one can apply a lot of glue in a hurry.

    MS-BRID_H_big.jpg

    I also use acid brushes for stuff that would wreck my "good" brush; the ones I get from McMaster Carr are vastly superior and only a little more expensive than the ones that come off Amazon. The virtually neve shed and don't require any trim for use unless you need a stiffer brush.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
    Posts
    2,078
    I have 5 little jars each with a little brush inside. 1 in paint thinner, 1 in lacquer thinner, 1 in denatured, 1 in acetone, 1 in soap and water. It takes a while to figure out which brush will survive in which solvent. None of mine are as pretty as Rogers. (well maybe 1 is).
    Missouri, Where the Walnut trees grow straight, tall, and gigantic. Therefore, it's not that bad.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
    Posts
    2,790
    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    Have gone through 2 bags ( 36 each) of those acid brushes....and have yet to see any wayward bristles wandering around...may I ask what are you doing to them?
    Nothing special as far as I know. I've purchased them at a number of different places and no matter what they seem to shed like a mangy dog. I crimp the metal down tight and trim the bristles back with a razor blade to get them a little stiffer and easier to control. It never seems to fail that I'll need to pick a couple bristles out of the glue joint with tweezers before clamp up. I might try to grab a couple artist brushes next time I'm at Wally World.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
    Posts
    2,790
    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    I've been using these bridled glue brushes for years. The main one, a medium size, has been in at least weekly use (and some weeks almost continuous use) for upwards of 15 years now and is still going strong. It had gotten a bit short, so I recently "unbridled" it, and expect another decade or two of use. The big one can apply a lot of glue in a hurry.

    MS-BRID_H_big.jpg
    These look like good quality brushes. Do you recall where you found them?
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by chris carter View Post
    I have never understood using those metal brushes which shed hairs for glue. They are great for really nasty stuff (grease, acid, oil, silicone, etc.), but for glue? Maybe epoxy I guess Ė thatís pretty nasty.

    For white glue, yellow glue, hot or liquid hide glue, I use regular art paint brushes. They can be had for almost as cheap as the metal brushes, but they are VASTLY higher quality. They donít shed. You can cut the wood handle to whatever length you want. They come in a billion sizes (just get a variety pack and you are good for any situation). They clean up in the sink very easily and the bristles donít get messed up when you do. And they are DURABLE. In fact, Iíve been using the same two brushes for three or four years now! Thatís a total cost of, um, 40 cents? And one of them was already used as a paint brush before I snatched it up (before I met my wife, she used to like to paint Ė so really, these were free to me). They are also much more precise for getting into difficult spots or when you canít have any glue getting where it shouldnít go.
    glue brushes.jpg


    Here, here!! I'd been thinking of starting a thread about this. Folks spend thousands of $ on special squares and jigs, then slop glue around with junk.

    I wore out a pretty decent artist brush after years, and have been experimenting with some middling quality ones, but I think I will go back to the art supply for something better.

    the experimentation has shown the value of smaller sizes.

    Here are the current ones, and the brush washer- a vitamin bottle with a hole punched in the top. The water gets changed a few times a year, and the brushes are OK with being left overnight if you don't take them out.

    Relative to an acid brush, the longer handle provide more control- that's why artists use them.

    IMG_3968.jpegIMG_3969.jpg

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    26,297
    Blog Entries
    1
    Like many, I go through acid brushes pretty regularly using them to apply glue. I always need to prep them first by trimming the bristles and tightening the crimp that holds them in. Still, bristles fall out and theyíre essentially a one use brush.
    Something learned many years ago about acid brushes is instead of trimming the bristles, push them back into the metal to the length desired or a little longer than desired if you want to trim them. Then crimp the metal. This helps to keep bristles from falling out and the bristles can be pulled out later if needed.

    Acid brushes are uncomfortable in my hands. Art brushes with stiff bristle also work fine for applying glue. Titebond III will wash out if it is caught before it dries.

    Lee Valley sells what are listed as "Disposable Natural-Bristle Brushes" in sizes from 1/2 to 3".

    Disposable Natural-Bristle Brushes half inch.jpg

    The 1/2" size is inexpensive at 10 for $5.50. One of my orders a few years ago packs of various sizes of these were purchased. This is a lot cheaper than what they sell for in the Borgs or an art & crafts supply store.

    They are used and cleaned for many tasks in the shop. The handles are sanded and sometimes given a coat of shellac or tung oil. The bristles are trimmed and the metal is crimped if needed. There are usually one or two on my bench for cleaning dust and shavings from planes.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Goleta / Santa Barbara
    Posts
    909
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    These look like good quality brushes. Do you recall where you found them?
    The photo is lifted from Tools for Working Wood - i Googled "bridled glue brushes" $7 to $45 each, depending upon size . . . .

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    770
    For mortises and tenons, I use the acid brushes. I've never seen an errant bristles, and if I did, it would not bother me at all.

    The Paul Sellers method that I was taught is to use wooden sticks to spread the glue.

    For any surface larger than say an inch, I will use a disposable paint brush or a small roller, or old credit card. For larger surfaces, a notched credit card also works. I also have been known to use a plastic putty knife into which I have cut notches.
    Regards,

    Tom

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •