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Thread: Reading milk labels

  1. #1

    Reading milk labels

    While shopping at the grocery store a few weeks ago, I read the nutrition labels.

    Skim milk had 14 grams of carbohydrates per 8 oz serving.

    2% milk had 13 grams of carbs per 8 oz serving.

    Whole milk has 12 grams of carbs per 8 oz serving,

    Heavy whipping cream has 6.3 grams of carbs per 8 oz serving. (less than half of the carbs in skim milk)

    So is skim milk really that much better for you? (I must admit that growing up next to a guernsey dairy, I was accustomed to much richer milk than is sold in the stores. I used to splurge and drink a half pint of cream once in a while)

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Hilbert Jr View Post
    While shopping at the grocery store a few weeks ago, I read the nutrition labels.

    Skim milk had 14 grams of carbohydrates per 8 oz serving.

    2% milk had 13 grams of carbs per 8 oz serving.

    Whole milk has 12 grams of carbs per 8 oz serving,

    Heavy whipping cream has 6.3 grams of carbs per 8 oz serving. (less than half of the carbs in skim milk)

    So is skim milk really that much better for you? (I must admit that growing up next to a guernsey dairy, I was accustomed to much richer milk than is sold in the stores. I used to splurge and drink a half pint of cream once in a while)
    whole fat milk contains fewer carbohydrates than low-fat or skim because more of its volume is made up of fat, which does not contain lactose.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Hilbert Jr View Post
    While shopping at the grocery store a few weeks ago, I read the nutrition labels.

    Skim milk had 14 grams of carbohydrates per 8 oz serving.

    2% milk had 13 grams of carbs per 8 oz serving.

    Whole milk has 12 grams of carbs per 8 oz serving,

    Heavy whipping cream has 6.3 grams of carbs per 8 oz serving. (less than half of the carbs in skim milk)

    So is skim milk really that much better for you? (I must admit that growing up next to a guernsey dairy, I was accustomed to much richer milk than is sold in the stores. I used to splurge and drink a half pint of cream once in a while)
    Did you note what the calorie counts were for the different levels of milk fat content? I think that would be interesting to know.
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  4. #4
    For the last 15 years as a heart patient, I was all about watching fat. Last week my bloodwork showed high A1C so now I am reading the carb #'s too. Interesting to look at those fat vs. carb numbers on milk. Never knew it.

  5. #5
    I lost 40 pounds since I went on a KETO diet. Seems to come off easily enough with this diet. I can eat all the meat, fats, cheese, fiber, etc I want, but have to strictly limit carbs which means no/extremely few starches or sugars. Things like pasta, bread, even fruit are reserved for special occasions. We have a substantial berry patch and it is hard to avoid just grazing the berry patch during the season. (45 blueberry bushes, 15 black berries, wine berries, rasberries, aronia, high bush cranberries, Cape gooseberries, etc. I still wander through gulping a couple hand fulls of berries, but not eating as many as I had been.

  6. #6
    Look up CURRENT thinking on low fat vs whole milk. Seems the jury is out again on fats in milk. Personally for me it's a no brainner, I refuse to pay for and drink "white water." If I want water, then that's what I drink, and if I want milk, that's what I drink. If it tastes good, spit it out!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Hilbert Jr View Post
    So is skim milk really that much better for you? (I must admit that growing up next to a guernsey dairy, I was accustomed to much richer milk than is sold in the stores. I used to splurge and drink a half pint of cream once in a while)
    They all have about the same calcium, which is good for your bones. I suppose the protein's around the same, too, and that's good for muscles and such.

    Your brain, on the other hand... well, that sucker's built outta FAT.
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  8. #8
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    Something else to consider is shelf life if you don't drink it that often.
    With the price of milk (good lord with the price of everything!) I buy what's on sale, sometimes a gallon (container) sometimes several half gallons.

    I happened to notice the "best by" dates varies according to fat content.
    Skim goes bad the fastest, then 1%, then 2%, then whole milk. ( I drink 2%).
    I also buy a small container of half-and-half , and I've noticed that the "best by" date is at least 2 months away!
    So apparently the fat acts as a stabilizer and/or preservative(?).

    Placing it on the the lowest shelf towards the back (where it's coldest in my fridge) I've had containers of 2% typically last about 5 days past the "best by" date with no noticeable change in flavor or consistency.
    But then on the 6th day BOOM! I can tell it's time to dump it. But usually I use it up before then.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patty Hann View Post
    Something else to consider is shelf life if you don't drink it that often.
    With the price of milk (good lord with the price of everything!) I buy what's on sale, sometimes a gallon (container) sometimes several half gallons.

    I happened to notice the "best by" dates varies according to fat content.
    Skim goes bad the fastest, then 1%, then 2%, then whole milk. ( I drink 2%).
    I also buy a small container of half-and-half , and I've noticed that the "best by" date is at least 2 months away!
    So apparently the fat acts as a stabilizer and/or preservative(?).

    Placing it on the the lowest shelf towards the back (where it's coldest in my fridge) I've had containers of 2% typically last about 5 days past the "best by" date with no noticeable change in flavor or consistency.
    But then on the 6th day BOOM! I can tell it's time to dump it. But usually I use it up before then.
    Interestingly, I freeze all the milk I buy when I get it home. Then defrost it in the fridge a few days before I need it. I find that the milk lasts far longer refrigerated that way. Not sure why, but the difference is VERY noticeable. I almost never have milk go bad anymore. Used to happen all the time.
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  10. #10
    If I buy milk from United Dairies (Aldi's), it has to be USED by sell by date, or converted into buttermilk. When we had Kroger, their brand would go at least a week beyond best by date. Food Lion (local chain) and Walmart usually make best by date. If I get a jug (whole milk) that has cream in the top of jug, it usually doesn't make the sell by date, so I add a tablespoon of vinegar to a cup of milk and mix it into my buttermilk container. Every Saturday morning, I make a batch of biscuits, using two cups of buttermilk. Many cake and pie recipes call for buttermilk also, so none goes to waste. Instead it goes to my waist

  11. #11
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    The biggest variable for the lifespan of milk from various sources, assuming identical storage conditions, is the time and temperature of pasteurization. The longer and hotter, the longer the milk will last, albeit at some degradation of quality (don't try to make fresh mozzarella from ultra-pasteurized milk!). I find that the milk from the Costco lasts a week past the "sell by" date, whereas that from the local dairies has a much shorter window and often goes bad before the "sell by" date. I think the local "organic" guys do the minimum necessary, whereas Costco ships the milk in from afar and gives it a good cooking to extend the life. Since I can't tell the difference and the long lasting stuff costs half or a third the money that's the way I go.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Patty Hann View Post
    Something else to consider is shelf life if you don't drink it that often. ...
    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    The biggest variable for the lifespan of milk from various sources, ...
    Take a look at the 'Ultra filtered' offerings (i.e. Fairlife brand is one in my area). It is expensive, but it's 'best by' dates are usually 2-2.5months out - as found on the shelf. Half gallon will last me 2 mo.

  13. #13
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    I figure it is a pick your poison situation. I am more at risk for vascular disease than type 2 diabetes so I avoid fat more than carbohydrates. My second thought was how our tastes and preferences can definitely change over the years. Case in point is the fat content of milk and sweet vs. unsweet tea. I grew up on whole milk and very sweet tea. Many years ago I gradually transitioned to skim milk and now can't stand the cloying taste of whole milk. Same with tea. After transitioning to unsweet tea I can't stand even a sip of sweet tea. I make 2 gallons of tea a week just for me.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allan Dozier View Post
    ..... I make 2 gallons of tea a week just for me.
    HA! Only two gallons??? Piker!
    I make two gallons every Wed and then again on Saturday. (and unsweetened also)

  15. #15
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    I would imagine that most of the carbs in milk is sugar. All milk has a fair amount of sugar and whole milk has a lot of fats, especially saturated. Neither the sugar nor the fat, especially saturated, are good for you. The problem with drinking soy or another milk substitute is that, unless you can deal with the lack of taste of unsweetened versions of these, the amount of sugar is still high, although probably less than any of the real milks.

    Years ago I found out that reading labels and gaining an understanding of what they mean for you as an individual, relating to your particular health and health problems is worthwhile. I'd be the first to admit that I don't always follow the correct diet, I do know when I'm not and try to avoid that. I would love to be one of those people who never seemed to have high cholesterol, high triglycerides, or need to worry about sugar, but I'm not.

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