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Thread: What flooring for 2nd story workshop

  1. #1

    What flooring for 2nd story workshop

    After 10 months of waiting for a permit, my shop is close to being done. I'll post pictures soon but I have a question.

    In the new workshop I have a second floor (there is a lift) that is right now plywood. I'm thinking of some kind of flooring but I am not sure what will work. My plan for it is to store wood, lesser used tools, etc on the second floor using rolling carts. The carts may weight up to 400lbs.

    I've seen rubber mats for garages but I don't know how well those will work trying to roll a cart across them.

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
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    If anything, another layer of plywood perpendicular to the installed floor will be just fine for a storage area if you want to increase strength, although it's not likely necessary. But also keep in mind that adding more floor cuts into the available load capacity for your second floor to store materials...this is a structural thing and it's important to consider. The thin "garage mats" are fine if you just want to clean things up, but for storage, I'd not do that.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Rutman View Post
    I've seen rubber mats for garages but I don't know how well those will work trying to roll a cart across them.

    Any suggestions?
    If you want to have rubber mats upstairs for some reason -- occasional use of specialty tools up there, or what-have-you -- I'd recommend horse stall mats. They're firm, and you can roll even small casters across them if you're very determined. Caveat is that the mats themselves are pretty dang heavy, but on the other hand you'll never wear them out.

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  4. #4
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    Wood would be my choice. Stall mats, work, but I'll put those on concrete. Wood is far kinder on my feet, knees, and back.
    ~mike

    happy in my mud hut

  5. #5
    Not planning on doing much more than moving stuff to and from the lift. My concern with just plywood is long term storage of a heavy cart would likely dent the plywood. I've never actually stored anything on a plywood floor before, so I don't know that.

  6. #6
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    I think you will find that the plywood used for this kind of application is pretty resilient to point loads, but you could add a layer of something like Advantec on top for a "harder" surface. The type of wheels on your cart matters, too. I'd take care of that first and only add to the floor if you found it to be necessary over time...for cost reasons given it's storage.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I think you will find that the plywood used for this kind of application is pretty resilient to point loads, but you could add a layer of something like Advantec on top for a "harder" surface. The type of wheels on your cart matters, too. I'd take care of that first and only add to the floor if you found it to be necessary over time...for cost reasons given it's storage.
    Jim, I'm getting nowhere googling Advantec. Which stuff are you referring to? Sounds interesting.
    - Its not that Im so smart, its just that I stay with problems longer. Albert Einstein
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  8. #8
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    Advantech is a water resistant oriented strand subfloor product. LP has a similar subfloor product. It's like a "super OSB" that doesn't flake. LP uses polyurethane glues to assemble it and I suspect the manufacturer of Advantech does the same. Likely need to get it from a local full service lumber yard as the 'borg tends to only stock the cheaper stuff.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
    what wheels do you recommend?

  10. #10
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    That floor really should be nailed down like a shear wall shouldn't it.
    Bill D

  11. #11
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    I used LP TopNotch 350 over the foam on my shop floor and have had two carts of lumber that were heavy enough I could barely roll them on it with no damage. Advantech seems similarly hard but I have not put a loaded cart on it. One cart has been emptied now and converted into a work table and the other is still loaded. One was solidly piled with hardwood lumber mostly 8' long, to a depth of 6 feet or so, on 4 5" dia. 2-3" wide casters, so there was a lot of point load.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Rutman View Post
    what wheels do you recommend?
    Talk to the folks at castercity.com. They have a variety of materials in their line and I'm sure they can help you optimize the material for your application so the weight is properly supported without crushing the floor material. What you don't want is "hard hard" wheels for sure.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    Jim, I'm getting nowhere googling Advantec. Which stuff are you referring to? Sounds interesting.
    This stuff I believe. I have it in my shop and my cast iron bench vice fell on it and hardly dented it. It did but only about 1/4" I was impressed.
    https://www.huberwood.com/advantech/subflooring

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