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Thread: Shooting board/plane or miter trimmer

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    The level of creativity "out there" is pretty amazing-that's a kewel setup that should cover most situations! But don't forget there's sometimes a need for one that's inclined at an angle to shave end grain, potentially with a compound angle. We are both correct, in other words. LOL
    That board does compound angles with the add on bevel ramp. I think he really did cover all the bases.

    Edit: I'm sure there's some angles you'd have to make auxiliary pieces to achieve, I'm just impressed by its ingenuity.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    The level of creativity "out there" is pretty amazing-that's a kewel setup that should cover most situations! But don't forget there's sometimes a need for one that's inclined at an angle to shave end grain, potentially with a compound angle. We are both correct, in other words. LOL
    Both can do compound angles, Jim, the second one any compound angle. It really can cover any situation. If you meant that the ramp isn't angled, you are correct. IMHO, that is unnecessary, 4 or 5 degress isn't going to make much difference in effectiveness. If you use a genuine shooting plane it's already built in.

    So if you want to do a 45 miter at a 45 bevel, here you go, but any combination is possible:





    John
    Last edited by John TenEyck; 01-19-2023 at 11:31 AM.

  3. #18
    they are two different things, guess it depends on the mitre trimmer. shooting board cant do all a morso can do like a beaded face frame. Never had a shooting board, be a good addition sometime.

  4. #19
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    Its not cheap, but the Veritas shooting board is pretty great if you're rather make sawdust than build jigs. YMMV.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kananis View Post
    That board does compound angles with the add on bevel ramp. I think he really did cover all the bases.

    Edit: I'm sure there's some angles you'd have to make auxiliary pieces to achieve, I'm just impressed by its ingenuity.

    Thanks John. Both shooting boards can shoot compound angles. The Universal one can shoot any angle of miter and/or bevel, alone or in combination, because the plane ramp tilts, as needed. Both also can be equipped with LV's shooting board guides for those who have a shooting board plane, as well as other accessories.

    I posted about them earlier this year. Here is a link to the Classified section where much more information is given, as well as links to even more.

    John

  6. #21
    The two devices are designed for different applications. Shooting boards are aimed at heavier, thicker wood, while the miter trimmer is mostly for picture frames. Picture frame shops aren't really woodworking shops. They need a tool that quickly cuts thinner moldings, from materials like 1/2" composite wood, plastics, MDF, etc. Shooting board is not for cutting, but shaving wood.

  7. #22
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    I’ve been using shooting boards for about 25 years, and own the fancy-shmancy version, the Stanley#51/52. For another time. Below is a ramped shooting board I built about 10 or so years ago, together with a Donkey’s Ear, shooting edges for a mitred box (ring box for a wedding) …















    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  8. #23
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    "Vally Ingtalesting!"
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #24
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    Looking at the picture with the Scotch tape roll, when you have a thin piece of work, on the 45 degree support, how to you stop it from sliding down or getting caddy wonky as you plane it. I could see me ending up with a lot of slightly elliptical edges as opposed to straight.

  10. #25
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    Chris, when you shoot the edge and create a mitre, this begins on the inner side. The more one planes, the closer the sides comes to become a mitre. It is relatively easy to see what is un-planed.

    There is no doubt that these small and narrow pieces are trickier, and the aim is to hold them square when planing.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  11. #26
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    Thanking everyone for all the comparison information. I took the dive into the deep end and went with a Veritas shooting setup. Have not had time to open the boxes yet. Board and plane setup will be a couple days. My plan is to use the commercial shooting board for 90's and miters. Then make another board for donkey's ear shooting. John's ready to use adjustable setup is really intriguing but I have overspent my budget for now.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Hayward View Post
    Thanking everyone for all the comparison information. I took the dive into the deep end and went with a Veritas shooting setup. Have not had time to open the boxes yet. Board and plane setup will be a couple days. My plan is to use the commercial shooting board for 90's and miters. Then make another board for donkey's ear shooting. John's ready to use adjustable setup is really intriguing but I have overspent my budget for now.
    Just to clarify, my standard shooting board is $175 delivered to your door. It shoots any angle on both sides. The Veritas shooting track can be installed on it. The Veritas shooting board costs $239, plus shipping, and is limited to one side.

    If you decide to make a shooting board for bevels, I highly recommend you consider beveling the plane vs. a donkey ear. With the plane beveled the board is just as capable as with it at 90 deg. The donkey ear is really limited in what size parts can be held on it.

    John

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