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Thread: New Workshop spec buildout

  1. #1
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    New Workshop spec buildout

    Hello all, and I am still alive! I have moved to Virginia, and finally am
    moving in to a new workshop. The space is 48x51 feet with an additional office that is 12x17 feet. Here is a video showing the space.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=binCbOeg...SIkaIECMiOmarE


    Here are a few images:

    219BCC4E-F0F7-4A0B-A6FA-57BA72C99B94.jpg EC14477D-5E92-4543-BAAC-3CAAA30C31CB.jpg 06ABCF6B-7AF1-4269-93FA-AE83E7730073.jpg 7CDD79E6-F8FE-40A3-B1A4-A24304EFC45C.jpg


    9DD30D58-2A4F-48CD-B74D-644F6FC1FFB0.jpg

    Im going to do a video series as we set up shop, and will do some videos on costs, decisions made, renting versus buying, etc. I want to share for anyone that may be setting up a shop and/or a business in order to share ideas. As always- there are many ways to do things, and I dont share to say my way is best, but rather to just share ideas so you can make your own informed decision.

    This is a rented space. I spent a year trying to find a space to buy and also looking for land to build on. The main issue was that I have to be in an M1 zone, which is manufacturing. That not only limited where I could buy or build, but also it added to the difficulty and cost of buying a shop. M1 zones all had huge buildings way out of my range, and land was expensive for building. My goal is to ultimately buy a space, but this space allowed me future growth at no CURRENT extra cost, i.e. I pay now for only what I need, but there is room for future growth and the landlord is very willing to accommodate me if we need to expand. The space backs up to storage units that he is willing to move and allow us to expand in 12x17 increments. That made this a real win.

    The landlord is just a wonderful person, and he did all the Sheetrock and wiring, which was a huge savings, and also part of why we went with renting. If I had bought, I would have had a whole lot more up-front cost, and I took that savings and invested into equipment.

    Something to note in the shop is that every outlet is at eye level. That makes it easier to unplug machinery for servicing, and to easily see if a machine is plugged in, as well as to easily plug in hand tools.

    In the video I talk about the wood flooring that I STOLE for less than $2 a square foot. Solid mahogany and solid white oak. There will be mahogany flooring under the benches and white oak in the office/design room. I would have preferred the other way around, but this was a close out and the deal was I had to buy all he had left and there was more mahogany than oak. Just enough mahogany for the bench area, and just enough oak for the smaller office area.

    You might notice the brand new Powermatic helical head planer, and the brand new G700 dust collector! Santa was good to me. I have in storage and not yet moved in a Powermatic 14 table saw, a sliding table shaper, Mini Max lathe with duplicator, five or six more small dust collectors, a moulding machine, and more. The G700 will service the main table saw, planer, and jointer. The other machines will have dedicate dust collectors. Some may share- like the two bandsaws will share one collector, but most will have individual dust collection. This saves a lot of piping, makes everything easy to move around, and dust collection can be right next to the machine for less lost airflow from ductwork.

    The space had high intensity LED lighting, but it was so direct that I added 16 4 LED shop lights that throw out a very nice diffused light. The goal was that when you are bending over your bench, there is no direct shadow below you.

    This is going to ultimately be a teaching workshop. More on that later, but you will see multiple workbenches going in, and that is why.

    Thats about all for now. I do plan to update as progress is made.

    Cheers,

    Malcolm
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    Looking forward to this!

  3. #3
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    What a beautiful, big, open space, Malcolm!!! Congratulations. I really love that exposed brick wall, too. It just "adds something" to the whole aesthetic that's pleasing to me. With that much space, you have a "yuge" amount of flexibility to set things up for workflow including accommodations for the teaching type activities that you mention. I'm looking forward to following along as you get things developed and up and running!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
    Looks like Phase 1 of the Over the Top Shop.

  5. #5
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    Off to a good start

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    What a beautiful, big, open space, Malcolm!!! Congratulations. I really love that exposed brick wall, too. It just "adds something" to the whole aesthetic that's pleasing to me. With that much space, you have a "yuge" amount of flexibility to set things up for workflow including accommodations for the teaching type activities that you mention. I'm looking forward to following along as you get things developed and up and running!
    The brick wall was a selling point for me. It will make a nice backdrop for photos of completed pieces, but moreover, it’s just inspiring. I really want to paint some huge canvas paintings to hang there. The space will also serve as my art studio, and I’m excited about doing some large format pieces.

  7. #7
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    Malcolm - good for you. Looks like an awesome space and off to good start. I will stay tuned.
    Regards,

    Kris

  8. #8
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    Great space. Love the brick wall. And when you say 12x17 office do you mean bedroom? I would live there

  9. #9
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    Big difference from that shop building on the island that had all those smaller spaces! LOL You're definitely moving up!! Great idea about the large format art on that big, beautiful brick wall, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Yetka View Post
    Great space. Love the brick wall. And when you say 12x17 office do you mean bedroom? I would live there
    I am sure it will be used as such during crunch times. Easier to sleep at the shop than to drive home, although home is only 3 miles away. Sometimes ya just want to crash and be there early in the AM. I need to get a futon.

  11. #11
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    I decided to paint the floors with one-part “epoxy” floor paint, and then seal with Varathane high traffic urethane. This made the floors much easier to sweep and mop because it filled all the pores of the concrete. Very glad I did it. Also, there were tons of divots from former walls that I filled before painting the floors. I’m sealing the expansion gaps with a flexible filler. Once done, everything will roll smoothly and have fewer places for dust to hide.
    FC25F915-60CC-4315-BFA4-A76C8E1EEC69.jpg

    I moved the rest of the machines in, and if you ever need to move heavy machines, this thing is the way to do it. 900 pound shaper just glided into place.
    31C3416E-6FA0-4B10-9223-738AE050A938.jpg
    I sealed one half of the floors and moved everything over and am now sealing the other half. All electrical is in and machines are being final placed. Next step is machine tune up, and then we start making fixtures like torsion boxes, assembly table, dehumidifier box, and more.

    Dust collection is going to be fairly simple, as most machines have their own dedicated dust collector. That’s how I like it because it lets you move stuff around and not have to redo all the piping, and there is little loss in efficiency from long runs of pipe. Thank goodness I don’t have to run a bunch of piping. One table saw, the jointer, and the planer will share the Harvey G700, and they are all located a few feet from each other. I unboxed the G700 today and the dust bin sure does look smaller than I expected, but the machine is built like an aircraft; really impressed with the quality. The latches to open the bin are anodized and heavily made, and the internal latch to release the bins is very hefty. I can deal with emptying the bin a little more frequently when all I do is open a drawer and lift the bags out. What a dream, and what a long-overdue innovation for dust collectors.

    Got the new Powermatic helical head planer off the pallet today. We manhandled it because I did not want to risk messing up the bed or head by lifting it with the hoist. It is not light. So nice to see a brand new planer in the shop. I have always been a “buy it used” kind of guy, but the planer I wanted to be dead on and I went with brand new. We will be converting the 12” grizzly jointer to a helical head as well. Really excited about having a helical head jointer and planer, and with the Harvey dust collector, shop noise should be much more tolerable than the old shop. I noticed that with the exposed insulation in the ceiling there was little echo in the empty building. I think especially once everything is in this will be a very pleasing shop to work in as far as noise, dust, and lighting; three things I am big on.

    Safety wise, we have sprinklers in the building, but I will be mounting fire extinguishers as well. There is a proper flammables storage cabinet with fire suppression ports and double walls. I bought an eyewash station and will be mounting a large first aid kit. I bought a bunch of ear and eye protection so we can hang them up at machines. I wear my own hearing and dust protection almost all the time, but I like to have them handy at machines for when you’re doing hand work but decide to make a quick cut on the saw, or when someone else is using a tool. This will eventually be a teaching shop, so I want hearing and eye protection at each machine. It also helps if OSHA shows up, and even if you keep your own protection on you, it’s a reminder to put them on.

    Once machines are all in place, I will do a walk-through video to show how I planned for workflow. I really like the flow already with main table saw centered in the shop, and a dedicated rough cut/ripping table saw near the wood storage. Chop saw also near wood storage and close to table saw and workbenches. (Chop saw is more of a rough dimensioning tool and fine joinery is done by hand and on the table saw.) Jointer and planer are side by side and just a few steps from the main table saw. Band saws are side by side with one for big cuts and rips, and one for curves and smaller cuts. Shaper is situated where you can easily access all sides of it for maintenance and use, and it has plenty of room for running long board or wide panels. Router table will be on wheels. Mortiser and drill press are close together, and sanding station in near vicinity, although I still need to replace the edge belt sander I sold when I moved. I am lacking on large sanding machines at present.

    Sheetrock in the office area is on hold just so we can focus on getting the shop functioning. Plumbing is awaiting permits.

    stay tuned!

  12. #12
    Looks great Malcolm.
    Glad to hear you are doing well!
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."

    If you want to know what a man's like, take a good look at how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.

  13. #13
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    Looks great so far. Can't wait to see it when you have everything all set up.

  14. #14
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    The bin on the G700 is indeed smaller than many of us are used to with the cyclones we previously ran, but it's easy to deal with...I had to empty yesterday for the second time ever, as a matter of fact. I'm reusing the Harvey bags and dump the contents into a larger 55 gallon bag...two changes before disposal. I cannot compost here at this small property so it has to go in the trash bagged. I will also say that yesterday was the first time that I set the "full" alarm off. The flashing light is certainly noticeable, but I was impressed that the audible alarm was loud enough and at "just the right frequency" that I literally could hear it with my hearing aids turned off with over-ear muffs on and the FS350 J/P running. That's with the G700 about 20' away. With the common cost of the G700, it's very reasonable for using more than one in a shop like you are building with the purposes you have...decent collection and reasonable sound levels.

    Good call on the floor, especially in "pre-used" space. 'Glad things are progressing well!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
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    What a great space! Looking forward to seeing how it evolves and I know it will all be first class.

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