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Thread: Need Advice on Friction Reduction for Jointer Beds

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Lafayette, CA
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    Need Advice on Friction Reduction for Jointer Beds

    Hello, I have the SCM FS41e jointer/planer, and it's a great machine. However, I have noticed that there is a lot more friction when pushing wood on the jointer bed than I expected ... even with 6 or 8 inch wide boards. Wondering what folks use to reduce friction on jointers.... paste wax or some sort of spray on product, like Topcoat? Does anyone have experience with the Carbon Method product?
    Thanks!
    Izzy

  2. #2
    Bostik TopCote.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  3. #3
    May be that you are just pushing down too hard. The best old machines had tables made of Mechanite ,a special slick and stable iron .
    Nothing wrong with products sold to make the wood move along , except the expense . I suggest using the products you mention for fine woods that will not be painted ,and using Wd40 , or similar for stuff that will be painted. Old timers often used kerosene.
    Please, never use a cloth on a machine until it is at full STOP !
    Last edited by Mel Fulks; 01-10-2023 at 2:40 AM.

  4. #4
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    I paste wax mine every year or so with good result.
    "Never underestimate the power of negative people in large groups." - George Carlin (paraphrased)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    McKean, PA
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    I paste wax my jointer and planer whenever the friction seems high.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    Waterford, PA
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    Paste wax on mine, twice a year. Dec 21st and June 21st as they're dates I can remember.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    North Dana, Masachusetts
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    I face joint a lot of Sapele, and it can get sticky.
    I use paraffin, and just scribble circles on the infeed and outfeed beds. The wax can be re-applied in seconds. Running wood smooths it out.

    The other half of the equation is to use push pads, not bare hands. I like concrete finishing pads from Marshaltown, available at Home Depot.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Stone Mountain, GA
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    +1 for paraffin. I think it makes the tables slicker than paste wax. I usually mix the paraffin with Boeshield for rust prevention. Boeshield on its own makes the tables kind of sticky IME, so first I scribble a bunch of paste wax then apply the Boeshield and wipe it all down hard. The Boeshield dissolves the paraffin to some degree and helps it spread in an even coat.

    Then, if you are ever using the jointer and think there is too much friction, just scribble some paraffin on your feed path and you'll immediately notice an improvement.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    So Cal
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    Is it the beds or is it a insert head? I had a jointer with carbide inserts the feed pressure was unacceptable. So I sold it.
    Last edited by Andrew Hughes; 01-10-2023 at 8:30 PM.
    Aj

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    I assume the folks saying paraffin mean solid petroleum wax not kerosene.
    Bill D

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    Izzy,

    I use paste wax and these push blocks from micro jig. They have a little tab that drops down and hooks the trailing edge which helps reduce the needed downward pressure.

    I have a Hammer A3-41 with insert head similar to your setup and face jointing a 12+ inch wide board is doable. The rougher table surface certainly doesn't help, but the insert head is the main issue if you keep the tables waxed.

    Make sure you are taking a light pass with wide boards - the depth of cut can make a big difference.

    Hope that helps.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    The best old machines had tables made of Mechanite ,a special slick and stable iron .


    I think you meant Meehannite? It is still being cast today. Nothing special just a controlled content and proper cool down procedures to reduce thermal stresses in the raw castings. Some Grizzly tools are cast Meehannite.
    Pretty much any quality foundry has similar specs to Mehaanite. Today they take a molten test sample and analzise it before each pour. adding stuff as needed.
    Bill D
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 01-10-2023 at 10:27 AM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    63,120
    In the past, I used wax on my machines including my FS350. I've switched to Boeshield because I have a much greater risk for surface rust here at our new property due to moisture conditions. I will tell you one thing, even with the way the wide machine's surface is ground, when a board gets flat, there is a suction effect that does make it harder to move. I agree with the mention of not pushing down too hard. Ideally, when jointing, one shouldn't be pushing down any more than is necessary to be able to move the board because you want to shave off the high spots. But when you are getting to "flat", there is a lot more contact with the metal and subsequently it takes a little more effort to move things along, even if wax or other materials are used to "lubricate" the machine surface.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Doylestown, PA
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    Paste wax seems to work for me. Izzy, you probably know this but I try to push down as little as possible on the infeed side of the table. Downforce on the outfeed table once there's enough to push down on. I use a push shoe - I prefer the push shoe to a push stick, it feels like I have better control. The push shoe has a little piece sticking down that hooks the work piece. That way most of the force exerted goes forward instead of down. Here's an example:

    http://www.waterfront-woods.com/Articles/PushShoe.htm

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2022
    Location
    Colorado
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    187
    Careful pushing down too hard on the outfeed as youíll be turning the jointer into a planer and turning the board. Yes jointers get sticky and paste wax is a good idea, which I use too. You donít need a lot of downward pressure, just enough to keep the board from kicking up at the cutter. Everything else is the jointers job. By the way this is in context of face jointing obviously.

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