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Thread: Panel glue up

  1. #1

    Panel glue up

    I have a 36" X 48" panel glue up coming up. Would biscuits or domino tenons help keep the joint height more even and keep it flat? Thanks
    Brian

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    I think that dominos have less wiggle room than biscuits but my biscuit joiner is a pretty “budget” type brand.

  3. #3
    Sure, some donít like biscuits. But you just tell them, ďwell , donít eat themĒ. Splines have been around a long time Öwhatís the difference?

  4. #4
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    If you alternate the clamps top and bottom you can flatten the panel.
    Steve Jenkins, McKinney, TX. 469 742-9694
    Always use the word "impossible" with extreme caution

  5. #5
    One thing that helps flatness is lay out the boards in the order you want , then joint one board “in”next board “out” . That way any slight
    deviation off 90 degrees,of the fence is canceled out. And I use spring clamps on the ends to keep the pieces from moving . And if you
    learn to make “sprung” joints you won’t have any panels popping open at the ends.
    Last edited by Mel Fulks; 01-07-2023 at 8:52 PM.

  6. #6
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    It's common to use Dominos, biscuits, dowels, splines, etc., to help with panel glue-ups and keeping one face perfectly in-plane across the assembly. The single requirement here, other than a tool that provides the mortises/grooves/holes/whatever doing it in a way that's not too sloppy, is making sure you indext everything off just the top surface...the one you want to be in-plane.

    You can also do these glue-ups without embedding things in them by other methods as folks have mentioned, including using cauls, especially those with a slight bow that forces things flat from the center out.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    One thing that helps flatness is lay out the boards in the order you want , then joint one board “in”next board “out” . That way any slight
    deviation off 90 degrees,of the fence is canceled out. And I use spring clamps on the ends to keep the pieces from moving . And if you
    learn to make “sprung” joints you won’t have any panels popping open at the ends.
    This is great advice. I always do this either in/out of jointer or up/down on the table saw. OP I would use dominoes for a gulp up that big and use advise here as well.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    One thing that helps flatness is lay out the boards in the order you want , then joint one board “in”next board “out” . That way any slight
    deviation off 90 degrees,of the fence is canceled out. And I use spring clamps on the ends to keep the pieces from moving . And if you
    learn to make “sprung” joints you won’t have any panels popping open at the ends.
    Thanks Mel, great suggestion. Brian
    Brian

  9. #9
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    I tend to use dominos and cauls, but I'm a belt and suspenders kind of guy.

    Dominos will work fine. Just take care indexing all of them correctly.
    - ďItís not that Iím so smart, itís just that I stay with problems longer.Ē Ė Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

  10. #10
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    Yep, agree with Mel and Jim. Jointer for getting the panel to come out flat. Biscuits and dominoes yield the same result for me when it comes to having a flush joint. Iíve used cauls as well.

    Thatís big enough that you should be able to dry clamp it and see quickly if it has a serious tendency to bow or not.

  11. #11
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  12. #12
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    I've used biscuits, I haven't used dominoes. One of the complaints about biscuits is that the wood on either side of the slot is prone to swelling due to moisture from glue inserted into the slot. If you then sand the piece while the wood is damp from the glue, when the glue dries there'll be a slight depression. Don't dominoes have the same issue? Or is there less glue used with dominoes?

  13. #13
    Thinking to add 3 dominoes per joint. I have 6 joints. I made a set of three cauls and will alternate clamps top/bottom. Would you do this in one glue up or do two and the join them?

  14. #14
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    I have used biscuits, but alignment has to be 100% perfect, as there is none, zero play up and down, and unless you provide some decent and consistent pressure to the biscuit joiner's fence to insure that each side of the slot is exactly the same, there might be an alignment problem. Add a dozen or more slots, and the risk of misalignment increases exponentially. Therefore I use cawls and weights to insure the panels are in alignment before I tighten the clamps, while I am tightening them and afterwards before I walk away. I'll often go back in a few minutes and check alignment and wipe off squeeze out, and if necessary, re-clamp the panels.
    Regards,

    Tom

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Runau View Post
    Thinking to add 3 dominoes per joint. I have 6 joints. I made a set of three cauls and will alternate clamps top/bottom. Would you do this in one glue up or do two and the join them?
    That can be reasonable, but is always dependent on the total width of the panel for "best effect". Only the middle mortise should be "tight" laterally...the others can use the loser/wider setting which will make your glue-up a lot easier. As long as all of the mortises are indexed off the same surface of the boards (presumably the top, "best", surface) you'll get the intended result. The same holds true for biscuits, dowels, splines, etc.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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