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Thread: 220v Plugs

  1. #1
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    220v Plugs

    Iím in the process of properly wiring 220v circuits and will be installing new outlets. Whatís everyones opinion on the type of plug to use? Twist locks? Other options?

    Thanks!
    My woodworking theory: Measure with a micrometer, Mark with chalk, Cut with an ax.

  2. #2
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    I am not sure if these would be appropriate or available but in the United Kingdom MK are considered the gold standard

    An useful feature is some of the products have a red pilot liht which allows you to visually determine if the socket is switched They have an arrangement where the plug socket fits into surface trunking which allows you to move the sockets or add additional sockets

    https://mkelectric.presti.media/me/#page/I

    .
    Last edited by Brian Deakin; 12-19-2022 at 12:41 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Cramer View Post
    I’m in the process of properly wiring 220v circuits and will be installing new outlets. What’s everyones opinion on the type of plug to use? Twist locks? Other options?

    Thanks!
    Depends on the amps for me. 20 amp for my band saw and table saw I am using 6-20P. For my 30amp DC I use 6L-30P twist lock.
    Distraction could lead to dismemberment!

  4. #4
    In general, I've found twist lock to have no advantage- they don't really lock.

    So whatever is compatible, available, and the correct rating.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cameron Wood View Post
    In general, I've found twist lock to have no advantage- they don't really lock.

    So whatever is compatible, available, and the correct rating.
    there are twist-lock marine style that actually have a treaded ring-nut to help prevent it from falling out. They are plastic so in an emergency, a bit of force and the ring should crack right off.
    Distraction could lead to dismemberment!

  6. #6
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    I also use 6-20R receptacles. Twist lock might offer some advantage for a cord that is getting moved around a lot or subject to vibration at the receptacle, but like Cameron I find they don't work particularly well for that purpose-- if you're twisting and pulling the cord they will twist right out. For a stationary tool there's no need or point unless the cord is someplace you're likely to trip on it and pull it out. In that latter case I'd reconfigure my setup to avoid the issue. Not sure I wouldn't generally prefer the cord to pull out vs tripping me. Some report much higher failure rates with twist-lock connectors.

  7. #7
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    6-20r is what I have now just was wondering if the consensus was to install something better. I guess not, thanks guys.
    My woodworking theory: Measure with a micrometer, Mark with chalk, Cut with an ax.

  8. #8
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    I used NEMA 6-20r for years in the old shop with no problems. I switched to twist locks in the new shop but question the validity
    "Never underestimate the power of negative people in large groups." - George Carlin (paraphrased)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Cramer View Post
    6-20r is what I have now just was wondering if the consensus was to install something better. I guess not, thanks guys.
    Define "better". 6-15, 6-20, & 6-30 are the correct NEMA receptacle designations for 250 volt single phase non-locking 15, 20, & 30 amp devices. There are varying degrees of quality available based on price, purchase based on your threshold of pain and desire for quality.

    ETA; If you want locking devices you'll be looking for L6-15, L6-20, or L6-30 respectively. Using the correct receptacles and plugs helps to insure that down the road someone doesn't get a nasty surprise when they find out the hard way that you used the wrong devices for the given voltage, current, and phasing.
    Last edited by John Lanciani; 12-19-2022 at 4:28 PM.

  10. #10
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    I have cords and plugs on machines with Hubbell L6-20 and L6-30 twist locks that some are over 40 years old. The twist locks are easier for me to operate than ones with straight blades. I remember replacing one end that the lugs got loose and arced the lug, and one end that I drove my step van (back when I used one) off without unplugging the cord into it from a temporary service, pulling the end off the cord. I still have some NOS ends from back then still in boxes.

    I will say that they, other than the one on the truck, only got operated once a year usually.

    I don't remember ever having a problem with them coming loose. I don't enjoy plugging in and out the 50 amp straight blade welder cord.

  11. #11
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    i personally use twist locks for everything except my compressor...the latter simply because I just didn't want to re-terminate it from how I did it originally. My machine circuits are all 30 amps, except for the compressor and the current DC, so all the machines get 30 amp plugs and all the receptacles are 30 amp, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
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    Mine are common 20 amp Levitons. My one piece, four gang, simplex wall plate is one of a kind (as far as I know).
    IMG_1038.jpg
    Missouri, it's not that bad. Best Regards, Maurice

  13. #13
    The name "Twistlockģ" is a registered trademark of Hubbell Inc., any other make is is a locking device.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Cramer View Post
    Iím in the process of properly wiring 220v circuits and will be installing new outlets. Whatís everyones opinion on the type of plug to use? Twist locks? Other options?
    Thanks!
    If needed, google NEMA receptacle chart for diagrams for various voltage and current.

    Some basics which you probably already know if youíre doing your own wiring: The receptacle needed depends on the voltage, current, and phase. Non-industrial applications are likely single-phase 15, 20, 30, or 50 amp. If the thing being powered needs a neutral (uncommon for shop tools) a 220v receptacle needs four conductors instead of three. The current requirements and the length of the run dictate the minimum wire size.

    Besides that, for non-commercial use in much of the USA I think using push-in or locking outlets is a personal choice. If in doubt you may want to contact your local electrical inspector or at least an electrician. (I am not an electrician except in Mexico)

    I installed push-in plugs/receptacles (NEMA 6-50) for the 50 amp outlets for my welders and plasma cutter, mostly 20 or 30 amp locking outlets for the 220/240v shop tools.

    JKJ

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    If needed, google NEMA receptacle chart for diagrams for various voltage and current.

    Some basics which you probably already know if youíre doing your own wiring: The receptacle needed depends on the voltage, current, and phase. Non-industrial applications are likely single-phase 15, 20, 30, or 50 amp. If the thing being powered needs a neutral (uncommon for shop tools) a 220v receptacle needs four conductors instead of three. The current requirements and the length of the run dictate the minimum wire size.

    Besides that, for non-commercial use in much of the USA I think using push-in or locking outlets is a personal choice. If in doubt you may want to contact your local electrical inspector or at least an electrician. (I am not an electrician except in Mexico)


    I installed push-in plugs/receptacles (NEMA 6-50) for the 50 amp outlets for my welders and plasma cutter, mostly 20 or 30 amp locking outlets for the 220/240v shop tools.

    JKJ


    220V is a long obsolete voltage in North America, replaced by 240V, and where 220V is still used it is mostly 50 hertz and a line to neutral voltage, brown is hot & blue is neutral. No 240V load requires a neutral, none whatsoever, so only 3 conductors are required, some appliances like ranges, & clothes dryers are 120/240V so 4 conductors are required. Knowing the difference is important.

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