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Thread: Why can't I make picture frames?

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike calabrese View Post
    You might try using what is used to make segment bowl rings, it is called a wedgie sled.
    You can get exact precise angles on a table saw using a DIY or commercial sled and a didital angle ga.
    The picture here is a segmented bowl ring that I did re-purposed, there are 24 glue joints at a 15 degree angle using a DIY wedgie sled.
    Cutting process would be slightly different as you most likely would flip end for end your frame member while bowl segments are flipped face to back but an accurate 45 using a sled should be quite easy and deadly accurate.
    mike calabrese



    examples
    wedgie sled likks https://www.google.com/search?client...TF-8#cobssid=s
    angle ga link https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01GDN47JW/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s01?ie=UTF8&th=1

    Attachment 490716
    To add to this here is a picture of the wedgie sled I have to cut segments for bowls. I used it to cut the bowl ring shown here. It easily will produce 45 degree cuts with a very high rate of accuracy. it is widely adjustable to just about any angle measured off the saw blade at the set up for the cut.
    My sled is DYI, shown here with the digital angle ga set at 135 degrees to produce a 45 degree cut.
    The glue up shown here is scrap pine example mini picture frane measures 4.5 x 4.5 inches.
    You can get real great miters and if need be after cutting test pieces move the fence to dial in your product cuts.
    The third pic is the length stop set in the miter slot, Other methods to control length would be the rip fence or a simple bloct set to the saw top with double sided tape

    IMG_20221128_153654.jpgIMG_20221129_154516-2.jpgIMG_20221128_162717-2.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #47
    An issue that can sometimes sabotage cuts at the miter saw is tiny amounts of movement in the workpiece. Picture frame material is thin, light, small, and can move ever so slightly mid cut. I ended up hot gluing a temporary auxiliary table with glued sandpaper, and suddenly my cuts became more accurate. Just pop the table off when done until next time.
    Plus I gained a good spot for clamping on a stop block and a clear zero clearance cut line. Just one more idea to add to the list of good suggestions you've received.

  3. #48
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    Mar 2014
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    Madness!
    Any photos?

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike King View Post
    two things have to be correct for a 45 degree miter frame to close perfectly:

    1. All of the angles have to be precisely 45 degrees, AND
    2. The lengths have to be precisely the same lengths (verticals equal and horizontals equal).

    If either is not true, then the miters will be open.

    Mike
    When I cut the pieces for the horizontal and vertical pairs, I stand each pair on end on my saw table and compare the sharp tips against each other. If they are not exactly equal to my eye the longer one gets trimmed to match the shorter one. This helps eliminate one variable.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USN(Ret)

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  5. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Because of the movement thing, for small thin frames, I find using my Nobex miter saw (a hand saw) to be a more accurate system for cutting.
    Hobbyist

  6. #51
    First, I have to ask- how are you checking your cuts? Combination square? Don't.
    Find a good steel(if possibe) or aluminum 'rafter' square. Test it against itself to see that it is square ( this may take some effort as last time I looked at some, there was only one out of four that was good)
    Now, cut two mitres on one side of what ever saw you're cutting with, flip one to make a 90 degree corner and place inside the square- your mitre error(or none hopefully) will be one half of what you see. Do the same for the other side of your saw, until you're getting accurate mitre angles.
    I know it sounds like a lot of work, but it doesn't really take that long
    I use a sled very similar to Mreza's, once built, it cuts beautifully with a good blade. I've got a Lion mitre trimmer too, but dont need it very often.

  7. #52
    My $.02...dare I say, most of us don't clamp down the work piece to cut on the miter saw or have a non-slip backing on the miter saw fence. As a result, as the you make the cut, the workpeice gets pulled into the blade causing a very slight deviation from 45*. Try clamping down the workpeice before making the cut.

  8. #53
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    Atlanta
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    To add to this here is a picture of the wedgie sled I have to cut segments for bowls.
    Nice looking sled - why did you chamfer the edge against the saw blade ? Seems like that would invite tearout.

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clifford McGuire View Post
    This ^^^^^

    Or a miter trimmer. I found a Lion Miter Trimmer on Ebay and use it for every picture frame.
    For some reason, the lion miter trimmer really scares me. Of course, I have four grandchildren.

  10. #55
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    Feb 2009
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    Cedar Park, TX - Boulder Creek, CA
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    Cutting an angle and flipping them over to check is always going to make a perfect match. 15 deg mates with 75 deg.

    Unless blade runout, wobble, generates a curved surface.

    I've found a very light touch on the miter saw yields good cuts. It takes very little sideways force to tweak them off square, or whatever angle you're set at.

    It ain't the saw, it's technique.

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Feeley View Post
    For some reason, the lion miter trimmer really scares me. Of course, I have four grandchildren.
    Yeah, you have to show some respect for a double guillotine. I was thinking about making some kind of lockout for it.

    Cutting an angle and then flipping it over is fine, but then you have to cut rabbets which creates another matchup problem opportunity, and sometimes you want the grain to flow.
    Last edited by Stan Calow; 12-03-2022 at 10:12 AM.
    Hobbyist

  12. #57
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    Nov 2021
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    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Grass View Post
    Cutting an angle and flipping them over to check is always going to make a perfect match. 15 deg mates with 75 deg.

    Unless blade runout, wobble, generates a curved surface.

    I've found a very light touch on the miter saw yields good cuts. It takes very little sideways force to tweak them off square, or whatever angle you're set at.

    It ain't the saw, it's technique.

    15 mates with 75 but does not a miter create, unless you are joining a 1 x 2 to 1 X 6. Even 44 next to 46 is not a true miter and the corners will show it. Particularly if you are working with pre finished.
    Missouri, it's not that bad. Best Regards, Maurice

  13. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    Nice looking sled - why did you chamfer the edge against the saw blade ? Seems like that would invite tearout.
    Hi Dave
    What you see there is a triangular strip of wood that is attached to the table saw insert.
    It is placed close to the blade but does not interfere with the blade at all.
    The purpose for the triangle piece is when a wedge piece drops off the sled at finish of the cut the wedge fall upon this piece and is directed away from the blade in an attempt to avoid a nasty kick back.
    I did not invent this by any stretch it is a ubiquitous piece of just about every segment cutter's setup.
    The pictures here are from the internet shows the feature pretty clear and you can see it in action in all kinds of Youtub vids on wedgie sleads. See this link below starting at 4:00 minutes real clear demo.

    Thanks for asking your question.

    mike calabrese
    sled 1.jpg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaEH...iHoiWAj56lgx2d
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by mike calabrese; 12-03-2022 at 11:06 AM.

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    15 mates with 75 but does not a miter create, unless you are joining a 1 x 2 to 1 X 6. Even 44 next to 46 is not a true miter and the corners will show it. Particularly if you are working with pre finished.
    15 / 75 actually looks pretty cool! I think this will become a Christmas ornament.

    IMG_1008.jpg
    Missouri, it's not that bad. Best Regards, Maurice

  15. #60
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    Feb 2016
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    NE Iowa
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    Beautiful picture that demonstrates the point about complementary angles, and the fact that while they are not fully symmetrical, they do in fact make a perfectly square frame, and can be quite decorative as well.

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