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Thread: 14 vs 17 inch bandsaw? Cast-iron vs aluminum Trunnions?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Parrish View Post
    Makes perfect sense in your case Jim, since you are designing a new shop around your tools. 30 amps gives your ability to have larger motors/equipment. But in the average small hobby garage shop, the larger 30 amp circuits and associated cords can be more challenging than 20 amp circuits. Regardless, I’m happy to have 20amp 3hp and under equipment and circuits for everything now.
    Yes, that's true. But the lesson I learned with the old shop is that one doesn't need a whole bunch of circuits. I spent a lot of money on that and it was a waste in hindsight. For the new shop, I've chosen the "least common denominator" for my single "shared" machine circuit that's used for everything that will never be running at the same time as something else. One breaker; a bunch of outlets. This works even for a small shop. A 30 amp breaker is about the same cost as a 20 amp breaker; the #10 wire is a little more but the cost of the receptacles and plugs is about the same. Only the CNC, Compressor and DC have dedicated circuits. However, the same thing would apply if everything was only 20 amp and that was the desired setup for sure.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #32
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    Actually, there are two comparisons in play: cast iron vs. aluminum wheels (several reasons why CI is superior), and steel vs. cast iron frame. The data that John cited show why steel is superior here. Is there even such a thing as a bandsaw with an aluminum frame?
    -- Jim

    Use the right tool for the job.

  3. #33
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    A couple of small comments. 1. I used multiple plugs on a single outlet for a long while. It is not a large hassle, unless you have two machine where you go back and forth. An example was the jointer and table saw, for some jobs. Multiple outlets on the same circuit makes things even easier, and is electrically completely kosher. The breaker is sized to protect the wire: as long as you are running 1 machine at a time the wire load is the same for 1 outlet or a dozen. 2. Out of curiousity I looked on the Seattle craigsist, and there is a 20" Rockwell Delta in Friday Harbor. Those are a well regarded machine on the owwm.org list (Old Woodworking Machines). There was also an Oliver 217 (30"), a very, very nice machine, but likely outside your envelope on all 3 criteria of size, weight, and $. Those who have one seem to love them. (I have a 26" Moak myself, 1100 lbs). Terry T.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kory Watson View Post
    I found a MM16 2003 model (3.6hp) for $1400 a few hours away. Maybe that's a good choice? A little worried about the mobility bit looks nice otherwise.
    Thatís a nice saw. Itís hard to go wrong buying an MM.
    At $1400.00 used, itís a better saw than you will buy new for the same money.
    Put a 3/4Ē Lennox TriMaster on it, and youíre set.

  5. #35
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    The compare was cast iron to aluminum, not cast iron to steel.
    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    Oh, my bad. Then it's even worse:

    Young’s Modulus for steel (29 million PSI) is three times that of aluminum (10 million PSI). This means that for a fixed geometry, a part made out of steel will be three times as stiff as if it were made out of aluminum. In other words, an aluminum part under load will deflect three times as much as a similarly loaded steel part.

    John

    The only issue for both you fellas is that the o.p. was mistaken...................none of those saws have an aluminum trunion, so the discussion is kinda moot.





    Actually, there are two comparisons in play: cast iron vs. aluminum wheels (several reasons why CI is superior), and steel vs. cast iron frame. The data that John cited show why steel is superior here. Is there even such a thing as a bandsaw with an aluminum frame?
    Sure - INCA saws invented the category if I'm not mistaken. And they are/were absolute gems for what they were designed for - which was not bragging bout bandsaws on social media or WW forums on how big your d^%w is , how much H.P. it has, or resawing "free" 16" diameter logs you got from your backyard (or neighbors) so you don't have to buy wood.
    Last edited by Dave Sabo; 11-26-2022 at 11:21 AM.

  6. #36
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    I have a 14" jet with a riser block and have no regrets. I would look around for a used machine and save money.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    I have a 14" jet with a riser block and have no regrets. I would look around for a used machine and save money.
    He already made his purchase...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    He already made his purchase...
    Did he.......

    It's not clear from the thread that he did, maybe you have some inside info ? Hopefully he drove as fast as he could to get the MM16 he talked/asked about, but I didn't take that post's "found" to mean "purchased".

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    Did he.......

    It's not clear from the thread that he did, maybe you have some inside info ? Hopefully he drove as fast as he could to get the MM16 he talked/asked about, but I didn't take that post's "found" to mean "purchased".
    Same here. Did he actually buy it? Photos?
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    He already made his purchase...
    Jim, You might be confusing this thread with my 14” bandsaw thread. LOL. I made a purchase yesterday but don’t think the OP in this thread indicated a purchase yet. But I could be wrong.

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Parrish View Post
    Jim, You might be confusing this thread with my 14” bandsaw thread. LOL. I made a purchase yesterday but don’t think the OP in this thread indicated a purchase yet. But I could be wrong.
    "D'oh!"....yea, I must have thought I was still in your thread. Apologies, folks. Sheeh...musta been turkey coma or something. Yea, that's the ticket!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Parrish View Post
    Jim, You might be confusing this thread with my 14” bandsaw thread. LOL. I made a purchase yesterday but don’t think the OP in this thread indicated a purchase yet. But I could be wrong.
    Unfortunately, the MM16 guy isn't responding. Was holding out in hope for a couple of days, but I guess it probably sold at some point but he didn't take the post down

    Speaking of that... I have the opportunity to purchase a new 220V 14BX for $1600 + tax and shipping. Should I jump on that?
    I don't even have a 220V outlet yet in the shop but I'll be putting one in soon.
    Last edited by Kory Watson; 11-30-2022 at 10:39 AM.

  13. #43
    That's an excellent price for that saw (14bx). Excellent.

  14. #44
    Kory, that would be a great saw and a good price.

    If you're going to wire in 220v, then use 10 gauge wire & put a few in. As long as you don't have more than 1 machine running at once, your good. I had a 60 amp box put in my garage (main breaker is the far side of the house). I ran a 10g up the wall from the box, across the trusses above the ceiling, then down the wall about 20' away (other side of the garage). I put in a 30 amp breaker, as my bandsaw needed that much (5hp motor). But then I ran a wire from that outlet another 6" and put in another outlet. Not to code, but I could then plug my table saw into the second outlet and not mess with swapping them out. I'm not going to be operating both machines at the same time, but more convenient that going over & figuring out which one is plugged in at the moment.

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    Iím all for safety. I worked in a couple of places where it was a big deal to walk away from a from a band saw without using the brake to
    stop it first. At first hearing I thought that was nutty, but It is possible for a band -blade to break while while slowing down , and send some
    blade footage flying out. Especially since many donít bother to lower a too high guard position. Some commercial shops tell new guys they will be fired
    at first infraction of safety rules.
    When a saw band breaks, that's it. Tension and friction is lost and the blade stops. I've never seen, nor heard of one sending the blade flying.

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