Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Jet 14-42 Pulleys

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Colby, Washington. Just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, near Blake Island.
    Posts
    890

    Jet 14-42 Pulleys

    Here's a success story to share with Jet 14-42 lathe owners. Those are the older machines with a Reeves Drive speed control for which Jet no longer supplies critical parts. (Perhaps this situation is only temporary and the supply-chain bottleneck is the cause, but the fact is that it will be hard to keep these lathes operational without replacement parts. The two sets of pot-metal pulleys, especially, are prone to wearing out.)

    One of my students came to me, frustrated, that his lathe was clanking and the upper variable speed pulley was wobbling to heck. I happened to have an old, but serviceable, set of them he could have. He installed them and also replaced a worn ball bearing, and the machine was better but still clanked. We checked everywhere, Jet, eReplacementsParts, etc,, and absolutely no one had replacement pulleys. It seemed like a lost cause.

    I have long theorized that these could be remanufactured by boring out the center and installing a bronze sleeve. Well, we took them to a local machinist, and -- SUCCESS! The speed control works better than it ever has, and the tougher bronze will outlast the pot-metal that was original. So, for those of you who have a worn 14-42 don't dismay (or toss your lathe off the bridge; it CAN be fixed. The cost was $300.

    --------------------------------
    While I'm on this topic, I'd like to offer a comment about the much-maligned Reeves Drive systems. Yes, they're prone to wearing out but this can be minimized with some reasonable maintenance. Clean and lubricate the shafts often. With some greases and oils, there's a tendency to become sticky over time and collect fine sawdust, which prevents the pulleys from moving freely. This causes the belt to bind and cause excessive wear. The other pitfall is that operators try to change speeds when the machine isn't turning, placing excessive force on the pot-metal. I owned one of these Jets for a decade and turned, probably, 10-thousand items on it, so I know it's a good system. Just understand how it works and take care of it.

    Russell Neyman
    .


    Writer - Woodworker - Historian
    Instructor: The Woodturning Experience
    Puget Sound, Washington State


    "Outside of a dog, there's nothing better than a good book; inside of a dog it's too dark to read."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    3,204
    You can probably use Grizzly pulleys for half that price. Personally I would not want to invest $300 into one of those lathes. They still turn too quickly to start on bowl blanks that will physically fit on the lathe.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Colby, Washington. Just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, near Blake Island.
    Posts
    890
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    You can probably use Grizzly pulleys for half that price.
    Are you absolutely sure the Grizzly pulleys fit?

    As far as whether the Jet 14-42 is worth keeping, yes, they are. Baseball has a statistic known as WAR (Wins Against Replacement) that kinda applies here. To purchase a comparable machine that has a speed control other than a Reeves drive you'll need to spend $2600 or more. A good, working Jet 14-42 can be had for as little as $900.

    Russell Neyman
    .


    Writer - Woodworker - Historian
    Instructor: The Woodturning Experience
    Puget Sound, Washington State


    "Outside of a dog, there's nothing better than a good book; inside of a dog it's too dark to read."

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Neyman View Post
    While I'm on this topic, I'd like to offer a comment about the much-maligned Reeves Drive systems. Yes, they're prone to wearing out but this can be minimized with some reasonable maintenance. Clean and lubricate the shafts often. With some greases and oils, there's a tendency to become sticky over time and collect fine sawdust, which prevents the pulleys from moving freely. This causes the belt to bind and cause excessive wear. The other pitfall is that operators try to change speeds when the machine isn't turning, placing excessive force on the pot-metal. I owned one of these Jets for a decade and turned, probably, 10-thousand items on it, so I know it's a good system. Just understand how it works and take care of it.
    I have used and advised others for over 10 years, to use a link belt on their reeves drives.
    The belt does not spall off rubber debris, which would then bind up the free movement of the pulleys.
    Note that link belts are directional, and use only dry lubricant on the pulley shafts.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Colby, Washington. Just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, near Blake Island.
    Posts
    890
    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Weber View Post
    I have advised others ... to use a link belt on their reeves drives.
    The belt does not spall off rubber debris, which would then bind up the free movement of the pulleys.
    Great advice! Spot on!!

    Russell Neyman
    .


    Writer - Woodworker - Historian
    Instructor: The Woodturning Experience
    Puget Sound, Washington State


    "Outside of a dog, there's nothing better than a good book; inside of a dog it's too dark to read."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    3,204
    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Neyman View Post
    Are you absolutely sure the Grizzly pulleys fit?

    As far as whether the Jet 14-42 is worth keeping, yes, they are. Baseball has a statistic known as WAR (Wins Against Replacement) that kinda applies here. To purchase a comparable machine that has a speed control other than a Reeves drive you'll need to spend $2600 or more. A good, working Jet 14-42 can be had for as little as $900.
    I guess you haven't researched lathes that much. Here's a bigger one for $1,695. Far less than you quoted $2600+ https://www.grizzly.com/products/gri...od-lathe/g0838
    Or even bigger for $1975 https://www.grizzly.com/products/gri...od-lathe/g0733
    As far as the Grizzly pulleys, it was recommended on this site in 2014. https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....Drive-Overhaul
    And as far as I am concerned, $900 is about twice what a Jet 14-42 is worth since it won't go slower than 450rpm. That is just too dangerous for a student turning 13" bowls.
    Last edited by Richard Coers; 11-25-2022 at 9:23 PM.

  7. #7
    These lathes are really positioned better toward spindle turning. Sure, you can turn bowls on them, but it's not an easy thing to do. High minimum speed, light weight (vibration issues) and lack of reverse all contribute to a more difficult turning experience. I taught myself to turn on one, once I upgraded, turning was more of a pleasure than a task to finish.

    Don't get me wrong, I think these are fine machines, but one really needs to know what they're doing before using one, they can be intimidating, frustrating and a bit dangerous for the inexperienced turner.

    Many people dismiss them, but the choice between no lathe and a Reeves drives is a no-brainer, there is a lot you can do with one of theses little machines.

    Grizzly sells a Reeves Drive G0462 -16 x 46, for $825 currently (+ shipping)

  8. #8
    Thank you for taking the time to post this Mr. Neyman.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •