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Thread: Advice please on installing glass within walnut wine doors

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
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    1,306
    I've used pin nail or brads (no glue) to hold in those stops on glass fronts for decades. Doesn't take many 3 -4 max and when it comes time to swap panels a semi-flexible putty knife is all that needed to get the center of the stop loose from the frame.

    Granted , mine aren't 1/2" thick x 3/4" wide. If you can't re-think the stop size, I'd just make up a 2nd batch for when the glass has to be replaced.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Exeter, CA
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    624
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    mickey mouse way to hold glass in, Reeks of cheap.
    Seems to work fine. Of course its not double pane.
    Randy Cox
    Lt Colonel, USAF (ret.)

  3. #18
    sure it does, so do pocket holes

  4. #19
    For small doors like on this TV cabinet I've used a biscuit cutter to make a cut in the rail and stiles just deep enough to work with a glass retainer. The glass is fairly thick textured glass from a stained glass store.

    glass clip.jpg

  5. #20
    Kevin mentioned a drawing, I always like to see things full scale. Dave said 1/2 x 3/4 for the size of the strips. If they are that large can you use some small round magnets in the strips and in the rails and styles.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
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    2,269
    Rockler has 1/4" quarter-round in walnut (oak and birch too) that I tack into place with a pin nailer. It could be pried off if necessary.
    Hobbyist

  7. #22
    there are always ways or a way to solve stuff. Full scale and knowing what im dealing with then go from there. If I had a door and a reason to have strips out at a later date I could see the strips machined with a lip on them that goes into a slot in three of the four rails and styles. Or Lamelloes.

    They could machined with a bend so the mitres hold them tight in all corners and the preload from end to end holding them tight. 3 done that way and the fourth strip the same preload and magnets. If you had to take them out at a later date the magnet one comes out easy. The other three of them now pulled away from the ends where the mitres are as they were machined to have a bow in them they stayed in the lip or lamello. There are number 10 lamelloes which are large and also some very small size below that. Know have used them past in splines. Width of lamelloes can be reduced easy on an edge sander.

    If the engineering gets too big then making twice or more as many strips as needed is fine as well. Small screw heads good as well. Smallest id past used were #4 1" or 1 1/4" heads were very small on those though what I used were galvanized. In a dark head they would blend and just about disapear
    Last edited by Warren Lake; 11-22-2022 at 6:11 PM.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    1,229
    Joel,
    this is the Knapp glazing bead attachment system. It only works for 18 and 20 mm wide beads. I think Paul Knapp is still set up for sales in the US. Just Google Knapp Connectors.
    It has a plastic extrusion that is screwed into the sash that holds the glass. A special shaper or moulder cutter is used to profile the back side of the bead. The IG is secured and the beads just pressed in for a friction fit.I played with it for a bit but this is a dry glazing system and I prefer wet glazing. This will not do curved beads and that is a big part of my work.
    DCAAB36E-6DFE-4B0D-9056-8672322B2488.jpg

  9. #24
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
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    4,369
    Blog Entries
    11
    I don't worry about removing glass in the future. I lay a tiny bead of clear silicone in a rabbit and bed the glass in that. No rattling and the glass becomes part of the structure. Don't bother with a keeper strip.
    photo (2).JPG
    Last edited by Ole Anderson; 11-24-2022 at 10:57 AM.
    NOW you tell me...

  10. #25
    Joe thanks for positing that clip system it looks good. You need three separate steps to machine what is needed for that? Two on the strip and one on rails and styles? How do you release it lift up on the bottom edge with a putty knife?

  11. #26
    These 1 3/4 thick 7 ft x 34 inch wide doors were to be made several years ago. I had other remodel projects to work on, and had no experience with making doors like this with glass to be used with seals for a refrigerated unit. Therefore, I hired someone who represented himself as a licensed contractor specializing in wine cellar design and installation. I said I would do the racking. As the project progressed, it became apparent he was not all that much of an expert, and with some digging, I found out he was not licensed. He ended up cited by the California CSLB, and I received a refund of my generous deposit. I then asked Joe, but he was backed up, and I ended up hiring someone do it who is a friend with a high end woodshop and a business making custom products. That was a couple of years ago, and he just never got it done. The doors did get laminated with mortises. So, at that point, I became involved along with a talented friend where the doors are now at my shop.

    The wood originally selected had a lot of sap, and ended up not being used. I was able to purchase slabs of wood once owned by Sam Maloof (see picture when the wood was in slab form). Nice grain, yes? Originally the plan was solid and that was changed to LVL core. One of the pictures is what has been my wine doors for 3 years. It is 2 inch rigid foam from Home Depot held by velcro. Another picture is of the inside showing the racking I did so far with top racking to follow. Another picture is of a cabinet door with a profile I had made for shaper cutters for cabinets. The wine doors are to be similar with a rail and stile frame, and a strip inside that is rectangular with a roundover. One of the attachments is a drawing, but the strip changed from a step design to a rectangle 3/4 x 0.42 inches with a 3/16 roundover.

    So many things I do not know and I do not want to screw it up. I think my idea of having someone else do this project was a good one, but since it did not work out that way, oh well. I would have to say it is a good learning experience for me, and I am being careful not to screw it up, especially with the wood that was used. For that reason I was seeking advice and appreciate the comments, especially from Ultimate Joe! Input greatly appreciated
    Screen Shot 2022-11-24 at 10.06.00 AM.jpg




    IMG_5646.jpgMultipoint.jpgAttachment 490471Maloof Wood.jpgDoor Style.jpgDoor no glass.jpgCurrent doors.jpgCloseup.jpgeeee

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    1,229
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    Joe thanks for positing that clip system it looks good. You need three separate steps to machine what is needed for that? Two on the strip and one on rails and styles? How do you release it lift up on the bottom edge with a putty knife?
    Warren, nothing on the sash. The picture just shows a Typical euro window that has additional grooves for expansion, weeping etc.
    yes just release it with a putty knife or scraper.
    I also tried the Rover system. It’s a little simpler but not as robust.https://www.roverplastik.it/prodotti...-per-il-vetro/

  13. #28
    thanks Joe

    Whats with that middle core, is that the latest version of stave core?

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    1,229
    It’s wood Warren. The picture is just distorted. The scantling producers in Europe do offer insulated cores for doors and windows with cork and other material embedded in the core.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    West Coast, Canada
    Posts
    55
    This would be my choice. L shaped with a nice rounded edge. Easy to install, easy to replace and strong.

    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    Joel ive done stuff like this in the long past. Yes you do see the screws. Like a bollection moulding, could have been lighter but fine as well. May or may be to your taste.

    Attachment 490229
    Last edited by vince dale; 11-26-2022 at 2:42 PM.
    History recalls how great the fall can be
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