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Thread: Bedside table dresser design

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Liebling View Post
    I don't feel like full extension is a critical feature for bedroom dresser drawers. Am I wrong here?
    Full extensions are nicer for drawers that will hold, shirts, sweat shirts or sweaters. Even drawers with things like socks benefit from full extension slides as the rear of the drawer can become like an archaeological dig with old items getting buried in the back.

    Our dressers and drawers under the bed with 3/4 slides and they don't pull out far enough to see the things that get put toward the back.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 11-24-2022 at 11:29 AM.
    Lee Schierer
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  2. #17
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    Although probably most of the mature folks (like me) on this forum grew up with 3/4 extension type drawers, I really like full extension, and in some cases over-extension (under kitchen counters). It is really nice to open a drawer and have everything in view and quick to grab. Very convenient, very smooth, classy feel to open and close (if you don't buy cheap hardware).

    I've become a snob for full extension, soft closes slides. I'm slowly changing all the slides in the built-ins in our home.

    ...or possibly I'm just too lazy to build classy, craftsman-driven wooden slides.
    Mark McFarlane

  3. #18
    I have lived on my boats (and travel trailers) half my 79 years and have become used to non-full-extension drawer slides. I don't have any trouble reaching everything in drawers.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  4. #19
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    OK..I think I'll go for the undermount. The nice blums are stiff at $300 for 6 sets - 3 drawers in two dressers, though. Given that these dressers will last a long time, I'm assuming it's worth crying once and enjoying for a lifetime.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Liebling View Post
    ...The nice blums are stiff at $300 for 6 sets ...
    Cabinetparts.com has 18" Blum 563H softclose in stock for $24/pr. Add a couple bucks for the locking devices, and you're at $27 per pair. Times six drawers, and you're at $162, not $300.

  6. #21
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    Thanks, I was looking at lee valley. That's much better!

    Is it worth getting a jig to mount them or is it easy enough to do by hand?

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Liebling View Post
    Thanks, I was looking at lee valley. That's much better!

    Is it worth getting a jig to mount them or is it easy enough to do by hand?
    You should be able to mount the mounting clips to the drawer without a jig. Boring the hole in the back of the drawer can be done without a jig, but it does want precision. It also wants a solid depth stop. I use a shop-built jig and a plunge router. Fastening the cabinet members to the casework can be done without a jig.

  8. #23
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    I usually make a disposable jig out of scraps.

  9. #24
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    Homemade jig it is!

  10. #25
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    Next questions:

    1. Do I need horizontal stiles between the drawers? The undermount slides mount on the sides, so in theory the drawers could butt directly up to one another, or? Is there an aesthetic or functional reason to have stiles? This is assuming

    2. I really like the look of the drawer front just being the front of the3 box (i.e. no show front), but I assume this makes it much harder to fit...especially if the boxes are hardwood and not ply. So if I'm planning on making the drawers from 5/8" hardwood, should I still have 3/4" for the show front or will that be too bulky?

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Liebling View Post
    ...in theory the drawers could butt directly up to one another,..
    Don't do this. Make a face frame.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Liebling View Post
    Next questions:

    1. Do I need horizontal stiles between the drawers? The undermount slides mount on the sides, so in theory the drawers could butt directly up to one another, or? Is there an aesthetic or functional reason to have stiles? This is assuming

    2. I really like the look of the drawer front just being the front of the3 box (i.e. no show front), but I assume this makes it much harder to fit...especially if the boxes are hardwood and not ply. So if I'm planning on making the drawers from 5/8" hardwood, should I still have 3/4" for the show front or will that be too bulky?
    The horizontal parts between drawers keep the sides of the casework from bowing in or out. Need for them depends on how tall your sides are. On a case which is only 24" tall or so, I wouldn't bother.

    As I said earlier, for inset drawer fronts I like the adjustability of the applied drawer front. It easily gets you uniform gaps around the show front. If you don't like the two layers of wood in the front of the drawer, make your drawers overlay the casework. Then the positioning of the front is less sensitive because there are no gaps to call attention. Of course, your dresser looks more like kitchen cabinets....

  13. #28
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    Aaron, I don't see a need for styles between drawers unless the cabinet is large enough to need the bracing (or you are worried about the cabinet sides bowing).

    The inset drawers I have made in the past were on cabinets with face frames but my commercially purchased white oak dressers have no face frame.

    I use attached drawer fronts (i.e. fronts are not part of the drawer)

    My process has been to make the box, then make and mount the drawers, then as a last step carefully measure and make all the drawer fronts EXCEPT don't cut the top drawer for height. I start attaching the drawer fronts at the bottom using double stick tape and spacers to get the horizontal and vertical reveals consistent. The top drawer front is cut AFTER the lower drawer fronts are attached, just in case I need to add or subtract a few mm to get the reveal consistent.

    A little work with a sharp hand plane on the mounted drawer fronts can help fine tune the fit. If a reveal is slightly off, e.g. the vertical edges aren't perfectly matched between drawers, you don't need to change the entire thickness of the drawer front, just the visible edge with a sharp block plane.

    I'm still a novice doing this, building ~25 inset drawers so far. The last set came up much better than the first set .
    Mark McFarlane

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark mcfarlane View Post
    I use attached drawer fronts (i.e. fronts are not part of the drawer)

    My process has been to make the box, then make and mount the drawers, then as a last step carefully measure and make all the drawer fronts EXCEPT don't cut the top drawer for height. I start attaching the drawer fronts at the bottom using double stick tape and spacers to get the horizontal and vertical reveals consistent. The top drawer front is cut AFTER the lower drawer fronts are attached, just in case I need to add or subtract a few mm to get the reveal consistent.
    I do the same thing except that I add a weight to the drawers before sizing the drawer fronts to insure the drawer doesn't move down when the actual drawer contents get added during actual use.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

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