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Thread: Covering up OSB - thoughts?

  1. #1
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    Covering up OSB - thoughts?

    I built a workshop a few years ago, and have been slowly chipping away at different aspects of it. I'm at the point now where I need to tackle the interior walls. This may seem unnecessary, but I need to get the walls covered before I can finish my electrical.

    Attachment 487069

    This is the second floor - first floor is concrete but the walls are identical in construction. The sidewall girts are 2" thick. Top and bottom of the girts were left rough sawn, but the wood facing the interior was planed smooth.

    I had a variety of ideas for the inside walls - one was to break up pallets and use the wood on the walls. After collecting, moving, tearing apart 20 or more I realized it was a very unrealistic idea, and abandoned it. "Luckily" I happen to have enough 3/4" rough sawn white pine to side the entire building (was originally going to be the siding), so have enough for the interior.

    So - was hoping to get some advice on how to go about this next phase.

    Right now, here's what I'm thinking:

    Plane one face of each board to get a flat surface
    Rip each board edge to get a set of standard width boards (I have an assortment of 12", 10", 8")
    Using an appropriate construction adhesive, apply boards horizontally to the OSB

    Questions:

    Should I shiplap the boards? The sheer amount of wood needed to be cut feels daunting. I have a Craftsman 100 table saw (1950's era) + dado stack, router+table but it's a basic model with just a 1/4" collet

    Which side should face inwards? Originally with the pallet wood I was going to leave it rough. I like the rough-sawn contrast, but it might be a dust collection nightmare.

    I'll have to do some testing, but would you glue rough side to OSB, or smooth side?


    Thanks for any suggestions/ideas.

  2. #2
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    I would use nails or screws to hold it to the OSB or through to the frame in addition to or instead of glue, but I would be leery of glue only, especially if you are going to attach anything to the walls. I got an invalid attachment message when I clicked the link in your post, so maybe I am not understanding something that would change the situation. I recently made some shiplap edges on ash boards to make a new basement hatch cover for the living room, and I got good results by cutting with a regular blade from the side and then from the edge. This means two cuts but it seemed easier than using a dado blade or a router bit. I set the depth so that I didn't have to move the fence or change the blade height. I just made one cut, flipped the board around and made the other one.

  3. #3
    Smooth side showing . You donít need ď thousands of of dust caches Ö.dust will find lots of hide-outs anyway.

  4. #4
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    Here's the inside, not sure why the previous image didn't load. If I had to use screws, I was hoping I could "panelize" the boards somehow and screw into the top/bottom girts - it's about 18" between the girts. I'm loathe to screw into the OSB - there is a self-healing vapor barrier on the outside, I'd prefer not to screw through or into it.

    IMG_2125.jpg

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachary Hoyt View Post
    I would use nails or screws to hold it to the OSB or through to the frame in addition to or instead of glue, but I would be leery of glue only, especially if you are going to attach anything to the walls. I got an invalid attachment message when I clicked the link in your post, so maybe I am not understanding something that would change the situation. I recently made some shiplap edges on ash boards to make a new basement hatch cover for the living room, and I got good results by cutting with a regular blade from the side and then from the edge. This means two cuts but it seemed easier than using a dado blade or a router bit. I set the depth so that I didn't have to move the fence or change the blade height. I just made one cut, flipped the board around and made the other one.
    My general plan for the walls - build shelves that hook into the upright posts from behind - it was one fatal flaw in my wall system I hadn't really considered - I should have used a thicker plywood rather than OSB. I'll get over it eventually, but at the moment I do not want to put screws in my beams/girts except for electrical and permanent fixtures.

  6. #6
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    A different option would be to mud/plaster the OSB surface between the timber frame structure and just paint it.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    A different option would be to mud/plaster the OSB surface between the timber frame structure and just paint it.
    That sounds interesting - but does it require wire lathe?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Pariseau View Post
    That sounds interesting - but does it require wire lathe?
    Since the OSB has a relatively rough surface, you may be able to get away without lathe, especially using drywall mud. It would not be hard or expensive to do a test with some scrap OSB and some boards to simulate the girts, etc., so you can be sure that the process is clear.

    The reason for this suggestion is both cost and because it would emulate a very traditional look.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 10-01-2022 at 8:46 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Since the OSB has a relatively rough surface, you may be able to get away without lathe, especially using drywall mud. It would not be hard or expensive to do a test with some scrap OSB and some boards to simulate the girts, etc., so you can be sure that the process is clear.

    The reason for this suggestion is both cost and because it would emulate a very traditional look.
    I have enough wood on hand to cover it without purchasing any - but I would have to spend time and money (electricity) to process the wood. I am intrigued, though, and have enough scrap of everything - quite possibly some drywall mud as well (the powdered stuff, right?).

  10. #10
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    That is a great looking space! Decreasing fire load would be a reason to use plaster. Using sheetrock would be way less messy than plaster. The Timber frames I have worked on were done with SIS panels that were OSB on the outside and sheetrock on the inside.
    For making your boards into plank paneling how about smooth side out with Dutch Lap?. I have made Dutch Lap with a molding head on a table s saw. It would be a lot of work. I think it looks nice. +1 for staples or pins rather than construction adhesive.

    What bit to make dutch or cove lap siding?
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 10-02-2022 at 9:17 AM.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Pariseau View Post
    I have enough wood on hand to cover it without purchasing any - but I would have to spend time and money (electricity) to process the wood. I am intrigued, though, and have enough scrap of everything - quite possibly some drywall mud as well (the powdered stuff, right?).
    You can mix your own or use pre-mixed. I suspect that mixing your own for the "big job" should you decide to go that way, is most cost effective. Check on what's most appropriate type for "skim coating"...there are different kinds of mud and I'm not very knowledgeable about what's best for this. But for your testing, use what you have to "paint" some osb with the mud to get a smooth surface (or even a "worked" looking surface for the appearance of old time) and go from there.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
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    I have found the learning curve for trowel trades to be quite flat. Plastering, stuccoing, or mudding that vault is not going to be easy. Even an experienced plasterer will mask all of the beams and floor so that the inevitable mess is easier to clean and the lovely wood is not stained. Joint compound is easier to work than plaster or stucco (mortar) because it sticks to the tools. Joint compound over OSB is not a standard application. If you go for a plaster look I suggest sheet rock. I have a good trick for creating a mud to wood corner that does not require J bead or L bead. I personally would rather work wood than plaster.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    I have found the learning curve for trowel trades to be quite flat. Plastering, stuccoing, or mudding that vault is not going to be easy. Even an experienced plasterer will mask all of the beams and floor so that the inevitable mess is easier to clean and the lovely wood is not stained. Joint compound is easier to work than plaster or stucco (mortar) because it sticks to the tools. Joint compound over OSB is not a standard application. If you go for a plaster look I suggest sheet rock. I have a good trick for creating a mud to wood corner that does not require J bead or L bead. I personally would rather work wood than plaster.
    You mention "vault" - however I'm not doing the ceiling, just the walls. The ceiling is 2x6 T&G.

    I, too, prefer working with wood - the only challenge for me is processing all the wood. I don't have a shaper - if I wanted to do any kind of lap it'd have to be done on my (small) table saw. I have some experience with mortar - I did a lathe/scratch coat/real stone veneer application on my foundation, as well as various repairs around the house. I don't think my first go at this would be perfect... and there will be a mess, but since I'm doing the work and I'm, shall we say, meticulous/particular, I would expect the mess to be kept to a minimum (but yes - lots of blue tape, drop cloths, etc...).


    This is all good info!

    - Plaster is very tempting, but then I have a lot of wood to "get rid of". Will do a test with some scrap OSB.
    - Dutch Lap looks nice, but I would prefer a flat wall. I can do a simple lap with my table saw (per a comment above), not sure this is necessary.

    The more I think of it, the more I like the idea of a plaster-style application. I found a technique in a YouTube video (admittedly YT isn't always the best source) where the guy uses concrete adhesive and mixes it with sheetrock joint compound. You might want to put your volume down before watching: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEJPb-0heb8

    And just reviewing different plastering techniques, one can apply a bonding coat of sorts and have a thin layer of plaster (ie, 3mm) without need of mesh. My main concern are any resins in the OSB that would prevent/reduce adhesion. I guess I have a lot more reading to do, but I don't have any deadlines on this phase.

  14. #14
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    Plaster would be a good look. When I mud over wood I use bonder, self adhesive fiberglass mesh, and Durabond 90 followed by Stay Smooth 90 or Quick Set 90.
    It is not an approved application and can fail in very hot, very dry, and/or damp environments. (I had a failure in a skylight trunk)

    IMG_0732.jpg

    I got zoomed in on your image and see the vault now. Again, what a cool room!
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 10-02-2022 at 1:01 PM. Reason: materials image
    Best Regards, Maurice

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    I got zoomed in on your image and see the vault now. Again, what a cool room!
    Thanks! I't s a bit, erm, excessive in some regards, but it's a very inspirational space, and I'd like to move my art supplies, tools and stuff to use it for projects.

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