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Thread: Can we talk about bottoms?

  1. #16
    Derek,
    I've never been completely clear on one point about using slips - could you please clear me up?

    Specifically, when using slips, do you groove the front of the drawer so that the bottom slides into that?

    If not, how do you keep from having a small gap where the bottom meets the front of the drawer?

    Thank you Sir,
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  2. #17
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    Hi Fred

    The groove in the slip lies in exactly the same plane as the groove at the rear of the drawer back ..





    The slip is fitted to the drawer back so that the drawer bottom can run through.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Skelly View Post
    Derek,
    I've never been completely clear on one point about using slips - could you please clear me up?

    Specifically, when using slips, do you groove the front of the drawer so that the bottom slides into that?

    If not, how do you keep from having a small gap where the bottom meets the front of the drawer?

    Thank you Sir,
    Fred
    The front is grooved and lines up with the slip. Use the same fence setting on your plough plane or router. The drawer bottom fits into three grooves -- one in the drawer front, and the two side slips. The drawer bottom is then screwed to the drawer back with a single roundhead screw and washer, through a notch in the drawer bottom. The screw is snugged up lightly to allow the drawer side to move. Its orientation is the grain running from side-to-side. The slips have to be notched at the drawer back - the notch forms a rebate that runs the thickness of the drawer back.

  4. #19
    Derek, Charles - thank you very much!
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  5. #20
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    Thank you everyone for the discussion. Iíve got a plan drawn up for the drawers in the toolchest and an idea in my head for the blanket chest. Derek, those slips are the catís meow.

    Now on to finding a Record 043 or 044 and making that adjustable sticking board.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Zor View Post
    Thank you everyone for the discussion. I’ve got a plan drawn up for the drawers in the toolchest and an idea in my head for the blanket chest. Derek, those slips are the cat’s meow.

    Now on to finding a Record 043 or 044 and making that adjustable sticking board.

    You don't need a sticking board to make slips. They are run on wider stock and ripped off the board.

    Once your plane is set up, run enough for your next few projects. They should only be made in quarter or perhaps riftsawn material. Band them together in twos, back-to-back and lay them flat for storage.
    Last edited by Charles Guest; 09-28-2022 at 6:44 PM.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Guest View Post
    You don't need a sticking board to make slips. They are run on wider stock and ripped off the board.
    That's exactly how I do it.
    I just nail the wider board to my well patinated bench.
    I then use a hollow to make the top profile.

    Slips.jpg

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Gillard View Post
    That's exactly how I do it.
    I just nail the wider board to my well patinated bench.
    I then use a hollow to make the top profile.

    Slips.jpg
    Hi Stu, what plow plane are you using?

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Hi Stu, what plow plane are you using?

    jtk
    Hi Jim,

    It's a Record 044.
    It came with only 1 cutter, but it was a 1/4" which is perfect for drawer bottoms I make. I leave it set up for this sole purpose.
    I have a Record 050 with a full range of irons for beading/rebates/dados etc.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Guest View Post
    You don't need a sticking board to make slips. They are run on wider stock and ripped off the board.

    Once your plane is set up, run enough for your next few projects. They should only be made in quarter or perhaps riftsawn material. Band them together in twos, back-to-back and lay them flat for storage.
    Charles, you are correct - one does not need a sticking board for grooving. What does need is a way to secure the board when ploughing a groove. So .. clamp, Doe’s Foot, end vise, sticking board … name your poison.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  11. #26
    One of the best tools I ever made was a dedicated grooving plane. ľĒ wide, ľĒ deep, and ľĒ away from the edge. There is no setup. Itís always ready to go. Itís a one trick pony, but itís a trick thatís needed over and over and over again. All it does is cut grooves for drawer bottoms, box bottoms, enclosed case backs, grooves for table top buttons, etc. So much easier than setting up my combo plane for the same exact task, and quite frankly, cuts better grooves with less effort because it is downright impossible to not cut an absolutely perfect groove. And it was dead simple to make as well. I made it when I had minimal handtool woodworking skills and was still trying to get into woodworking with power tools. I just used the the blade from a cheap box store chisel for the iron. You can find plenty of used ones on the auction sites Ė most commonly as the groove part of a tongue and groove pair.

    groove1.jpggroove2.jpg

    As for the bottom panel, plywood is the easiest. For something I totally donít care about, Iíll use plywood if I have it because itís dimensionally stable Ė makes things simple. If I care even halfway about the project, Iíll resaw a board down to 3/8 Ė 1/2 ď thick. Then glue those together for whatever size I need, plane the top side smooth and flat, roughly plane the bottom to whatever I need (nobody will see the bottom Ė and it proves it was made by hand!). Then I use a jack plane to bevel the edges until it fits in the grooves.

    As for holding the drawer side for planing the groove, I typically just use holdfasts. The front side of my bench has a row of dog holes for use with a dog in the end vise (doesnít get used much). Moving back, I have a bunch of scattered holdfast holes that get used constantly. So I just work on the back side of my bench for this kind of task and some of my holdfast holes are placed specifically for being able to hold stuff at the back edge of the bench.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Guest View Post
    You don't need a sticking board to make slips. They are run on wider stock and ripped off the board.

    Once your plane is set up, run enough for your next few projects. They should only be made in quarter or perhaps riftsawn material. Band them together in twos, back-to-back and lay them flat for storage.
    I know I don't "need" the sticking board, but it looks like a great way to capture smaller parts. I use holdfasts and a doe's foot currently, but I haven't made a lot of case work, so my experience is quite limited.

    Chris Carter,
    That dedicated plane is lovely. When I gain more confidence, and have more time, I'd like to make one.

  13. #28
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    Now, to potentially change the topic a bit...

    Is there a reference out there for what irons are interchangeable with what plow/plough planes? A friend kindly offered me a spare Stanley 45 that is a spare for him for a price I couldn't pass up. However, I'll need to provide my own irons. Do the currently manufactured Veritas irons fit any of the vintage planes? What is the interchangeability between the Record 043 and 044? Interchangeability between Record and Stanley? And how about internal to Stanley? 45 and 55 fit eachother?

  14. #29
    Regarding sticking boards, they really donít need to be fancy and can be thrown together from scrap and a couple minutes. I donít have the original photos and I canít grab them from my Instagram. So hereís a link to my post on Instagram with two pictures.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CWyHpCqrDvJ/

    Itís literally just a random flat board with some screws put in one end, plus any reasonably straight board. Hold it down with holdfasts. Itís infinitely adjustable, cost nothing, and took only a couple minutes to make. I donít require a sticking board very often, but this always works.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Zor View Post
    Now, to potentially change the topic a bit...

    Is there a reference out there for what irons are interchangeable with what plow/plough planes? A friend kindly offered me a spare Stanley 45 that is a spare for him for a price I couldn't pass up. However, I'll need to provide my own irons. Do the currently manufactured Veritas irons fit any of the vintage planes? What is the interchangeability between the Record 043 and 044? Interchangeability between Record and Stanley? And how about internal to Stanley? 45 and 55 fit eachother?
    I don't know a reference doc. Searching this site I found that Stanley made irons as recently as 2011 from pretty decent steel. That Veritas irons aren't exactly the same, but usually sorta' mostly work. Though, depending on your exact plane, you might have to take a file and make a few minor adjustments. Of course, you can sometimes find used or NOS original irons for sale. And also, many people just make their own from 01 steel blanks. (Lots of online help for heat treating 01. Singe plow plane irons are skinny and you only need to harden the first 1/2" to 1" it can be as simple as a propane torch and a bucket / can of high smoke point vegetable oil.)

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