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Thread: anti-seize compound usage

  1. #16
    stuff light rusts on the woodmaster as well. I just clean it. I dont have any of the new high dollar tooling so havent come across that before.

    I just do what they taught us and its always worked fine. Everything is clean and smooth before its assembled. What would make sense is knowing torque values.

  2. #17
    Iíve never seen any bad effects from using it . They put it on engine cylinders when rebuilding. Iíve see guys banging on planers to remove
    planer and jointer knives, when just a little never- seize would make them easily removed. And the guys who bang on stuff never look to
    see if they have dinged or burred the knife head. Iíve seen plenty of dings and a ding can make a burr ( Iíll let your Dad explain that !) May be that those guys fancy themselves as black- smith Ďartisansí who want each machine to have ďa dis- stink lookĒ

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Hill, NC
    Posts
    2,537
    I use anti-seize on a lot of items, but not anything where it can sling off and come in contact with wood. So to answer your question - no.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Bellingham, WA
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    1,901
    I use it sparingly, and not every change. Like just a bit on the tip of a toothpick on the first threads. It helps get consistent torque (though I don't measure it now, only the first few times to get a feel for how "hand tight" it needs to get)
    JR

  5. #20
    my stuff is all cleaned as mentioned, nothing is needed stuff assembles smooth and excellent.

    If while in a head bolts did develop some light surface rust its only to my advantage. When you loosen you hear a click as it releases. I use some cutters that are more dangerous than most of you and the last thing I want around them is something that makes things slip when i want to grab. The old guys I knew kept their stuff clean for assembly like they were taught. All my insert stuff or other heads or jointers planers all cleaned the same way each time.

    I just bought another split collar head serrated steel edge head yesterday, its filthy. Carpenter bought the machine and used this head and knives in t, the knives were dull as hell and the head filthy. I would have taken it all apart cleaned all of it wire wheel, hand honed or reground or had the knives re ground if it was too far to be honed.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    1,198
    Quote Originally Posted by J.R. Rutter View Post
    I use it sparingly, and not every change. Like just a bit on the tip of a toothpick on the first threads. It helps get consistent torque (though I don't measure it now, only the first few times to get a feel for how "hand tight" it needs to get)
    That makes sense JR. Great Lakes is a quality mfg. I think I would follow their suggestions. I believe I will try this on my four side planer moulder. Because of the position of the heads a ball end hex driver is used to change the moulding inserts. This gets used a lot and the the heads strip out fairly quickly. I finally bought a supply of extra screws but this could be a good solution.

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