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Thread: What 8" jointer would you get and why?

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Zeller View Post
    A parallelogram jointer is easier to set up and adjust when the dovetail wears.
    This is an important point if one changes the table setting frequently, particularly in a production environment. But I wonder if it's as big of a concern for "most folks"...many of us set the jointer up to cut some nominal amount (1/32" or so) and just leave it there "forever". There's no real wear happening in that case.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    This is an important point if one changes the table setting frequently, particularly in a production environment. But I wonder if it's as big of a concern for "most folks"...many of us set the jointer up to cut some nominal amount (1/32" or so) and just leave it there "forever". There's no real wear happening in that case.
    I change the depth of cut almost every time I'm jointing things, frequently ill change the depth mid process. To be fair I'm running a jointer with a ships wheel with .010" per revolution so doc changes are fast and repeatable.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    But I wonder if it's as big of a concern for "most folks"...many of us set the jointer up to cut some nominal amount (1/32" or so) and just leave it there "forever". There's no real wear happening in that case.
    That describes my use of a jointer in my hobby/craft shop. Rarely does the infeed table get adjusted. Maybe if I have a thick piece that is really rough I might set the depth of cut deeper for the first few passes. Then back to a thin cut and it stays there. My jointer has a Byrd head so the need to adjust the outfeed table is almost nonexistent, with the exception of the first time I set up the machine.

  4. #64
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    I have not changed my cut depth on the FS-350 since the day I bought it. That works for me, but maybe not for others. It really comes down to what one does. Most of my use for the jointer is for flattening faces and I prefer to take light cuts for that kind of operation to minimize the lost material before I can subsequently process for thickness. In the rare event I do an edge, I don't mind a few extra passes...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jared Sankovich View Post
    I change the depth of cut almost every time I'm jointing things, frequently ill change the depth mid process. To be fair I'm running a jointer with a ships wheel with .010" per revolution so doc changes are fast and repeatable.
    Jared - exactly how many dovetailed wayed jointers have you worn out in your career ?

    I've got one , third hand that's over a century old and rode hard....................it still keeps it's settings from when I set it up 40 yrs ago. My daily driver is a combo machine with dovetailed ways and it's just fine too.

    Buy what you want & like , but let's not pretend a jointer with dovetailed ways is somehow inferior, or not up to the task. Especially for a non-factory setting of a hobbyist.

  6. #66
    One a jointer the dovetail ways are more for a set up rather than for wear. Its not a high wear application. On my mortise machine the chain and chisel move up and down in the dovetail ways and in that application there is a fair number of inches of movement each time its used and some load from cutting.

    Adjustment for wear on the mortise machine will be reality at some point same as many years on a milling machine they will need to scrape the ways.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    Jared - exactly how many dovetailed wayed jointers have you worn out in your career ?

    I've got one , third hand that's over a century old and rode hard....................it still keeps it's settings from when I set it up 40 yrs ago. My daily driver is a combo machine with dovetailed ways and it's just fine too.

    Buy what you want & like , but let's not pretend a jointer with dovetailed ways is somehow inferior, or not up to the task. Especially for a non-factory setting of a hobbyist.
    None, and I guess my point got lost. My jointer has dovetail ways, and is 79 years old.

  8. #68
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    You might have to worry about wear after it's gone up and down as much as a piston in a car engine after the car has been a 100,000 miles.

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Hayward View Post
    That describes my use of a jointer in my hobby/craft shop. Rarely does the infeed table get adjusted. Maybe if I have a thick piece that is really rough I might set the depth of cut deeper for the first few passes. Then back to a thin cut and it stays there. My jointer has a Byrd head so the need to adjust the outfeed table is almost nonexistent, with the exception of the first time I set up the machine.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I have not changed my cut depth on the FS-350 since the day I bought it. That works for me, but maybe not for others. It really comes down to what one does. Most of my use for the jointer is for flattening faces and I prefer to take light cuts for that kind of operation to minimize the lost material before I can subsequently process for thickness. In the rare event I do an edge, I don't mind a few extra passes...

    I guess one way to think about this is worst case, it's a long arduous process to tune a dovetail jointer vs parallelogram I basically spend the 4-6 hours and save $500 and buy myself a $500 straightedge to better flatten it

  10. Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    This is an important point if one changes the table setting frequently, particularly in a production environment. But I wonder if it's as big of a concern for "most folks"...many of us set the jointer up to cut some nominal amount (1/32" or so) and just leave it there "forever". There's no real wear happening in that case.
    I am 100% with you on this one, it is super rare that I ever change that setting. Then again, I have only had the joy of having had to set the beds on a Hammer combo unit. I have not had to do it on my recently acquired Minimax so I may be just speaking from lack of experience.

  11. #71
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    There are a lot of good reasons that one might want to reset the cutting depth on a jointer...a particular leg taper technique I recently saw in a Bent's Woodworking video is one example. And then there's rabiting that some folks do using the jointer. I just haven't done any of these things as I use other methods. So many choices!!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    There are a lot of good reasons that one might want to reset the cutting depth on a jointer...a particular leg taper technique I recently saw in a Bent's Woodworking video is one example. And then there's rabiting that some folks do using the jointer. I just haven't done any of these things as I use other methods. So many choices!!
    I'd be curious how many people cut rabbet's on their jointers these days when there are many other options. Even if one does change the settings it shouldn't have any adverse effect on the machine for years and years. I'm like you Jim. I just take additional passes if needed rather than take heavier cuts.
    Last edited by Ronald Blue; 08-18-2022 at 2:53 PM. Reason: correct spelling

  13. #73
    maybe in hobby land but if you make a living you set up to do what you need to do. Jointing up to 16 foot edges required a much deeper pass. Mel has tons of time on machines and he was the first one to mention using a jointer like a straight line rip saw, he was doing an edge in one pass dropping the infeed up to the maximum of the machine. In some cases that is 1/2" or more, whatever needed. I cant remember how much the griggio can drop maxiumum. On the straight line you have to go get what you put in, on the jointer once the pass is done its still in your hand.

    and yeah used to rabbit all the time when I had one job that was 9" on an 8" jointer You rabbet off both outside edges first then flatten the middle to flip for the planer.
    Last edited by Warren Lake; 08-18-2022 at 12:02 PM.

  14. #74
    Never understood the fear of taking deep cuts. Light flesh cuts bleed ! The rule is “ be careful “. What is safer about a shallower cut ,
    especially if a shirt sleeve …or shirt tail is involved ?

  15. #75
    I always wear a suit, do worry about my Tie at times.

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