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Thread: Need for crosscut sled?

  1. #31
    "For example a sled allows you to rip an 18Ēx8í piece of 3/4Ē plywood and make the crosscut for cabinet sides with precision. And you could do that on a job site saw with a quality crosscut sled."

    If I were cutting things that large, I would also probably be using a sled. As it is, I wouldn't even attempt to cut anything that large, ACCURATELY .

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    1,061
    For me a miter gauge is a necessity as well a sled. Purpose built sleds provide safety, repeatability, and accuracy for creating parts that require a difficult and dangerous cut. In a production environment a thoughtfully designed sled can allow semi skilled workers to consistently produce very advanced cuts safely and accurately.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
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    636
    I don't use them. A well adjust miter gauge is good enough for me. I do have a home made fancy deadly accurate one, that I made 10 years ago, and used a few times. Like other, it is stored in the rafters of my garage. Too heavy.
    Regards,

    Tom

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    Redmond, OR
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    443
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    Yes common in our area. I usually call the mounties and they ride up then their horses and tie them to the tree on the front lawn.

    They tell me most people drop them and leave them part way down the road complaining they are too heavy.


    Id like to do woodworking what do I need?

    I dont know what are you going to do?

    Geeze! I hope you keep your maple syrup well locked up!

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    Haha yep they are probably working on (or have already released) a variable angle one.

    I like some of their stuff, but the overpriced shop jigs arenít for me.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Pittsburgh, PA
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    162
    Quote Originally Posted by Keegan Shields View Post
    Haha yep they are probably working on (or have already released) a variable angle one.

    I like some of their stuff, but the overpriced shop jigs arenít for me.
    Indeed. Already available:
    https://www.woodpeck.com/autoscale-miter-sled.html

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    322
    Ha! There you go. For 1.5k, you can cut 90 deg and at variable angles!

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
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    3,261
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    I think the point of the Exact-90 is that most cuts (99% according to TWW) are at 90 degrees so why invite error with a device that does miters. Make it fixed at 90 degrees and make it rock solid. Certainly a crosscut sled accomplishes that but the one I built is heavy and cumbersome to use. Some have mentioned making a smaller sled to solve that problem. I may give that a try.
    i really appreciate the smaller crosscut sled I built, as my back is trash. Also very useful for making small cuts, as the polycarbonate center piece on my large sled makes that difficult.
    - ďItís not that Iím so smart, itís just that I stay with problems longer.Ē Ė Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    New Jersey
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    1,239
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    Sled for me, I canít remember the last time I used a miter gauge
    Dennis

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    727
    So itís official: we all agree. It depends on the work. Glad thatís resolved.

    The first sled I made was the length of my Unisaw with a 52Ē rail. It was 27Ēx 6 feet, of 1/2Ē plywood. This was before the time I worked with a lot of hardwood; it was a lot of panels back then. In a big move it just couldnít make the trip, so in the next house (my current and forever home) I got sensible and made one about the size of the cast iron part on the table. It fits neatly leaning on the side of the band saw stand.

    I like the absence of friction on the work against the table, small though it would be without a sled. I can also easily cut exact angles after making a precise MDF wedge. Itís easy and safe to advance the sled across the blade, even with two pieces on the sled. I can always clamp a support against one of them.

    If I ever start making boxes or other small things, I can definitely see making a small sled, like 18x12 or so.

    Finally, although Iím a William Ng Five Cuts sled guy, and my sled always checks out square, I donít sweat it if itís off a scosh. Any square end can be trued with a few swipes on the shooting board, up to about 1Ē thick.
    Last edited by Bob Jones 5443; 08-14-2022 at 3:41 AM.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    1,061
    One of mine that gets a lot of use is a very rustic wedge maker. I made it 20 + years ago when I was out of shims and late for work. It keeps evolving. Every time I need a new angle I add another hole.

    IMG_0645.jpg
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 08-14-2022 at 8:14 PM.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
    Posts
    6,351
    I just had to make 90 - 15.75" X 8.75" birch 1/4" ply panels.

    I made up a parallel guide 8.5 inches long and used it to set the Makita track saw to make the 15.75" long cuts - then I made a stop block for my sled to make the 8.75" cuts.

    I can't possibly think of any better way to have done this - other than maybe watching that pretty young Korean girl from Youtube that wears the short dresses do all the work while I sipped coffee... .
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  13. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    One of mine that gets a lot of use is a very rustic wedge maker. I made it 20 + years ago when I was out of shims and late for work. It keeps evolving. Every time I need a new angle I add another hole.

    IMG_0645.jpg
    A fellow sledophile! Love your collection

  14. #44
    I use both, I see no need for it to be an either, or situation.
    My main sled is a modified miter-express. I have a 1000 HD mounted on it. This sled can do most of what I need. If I need something job specific, like a compound cut, I'll make it, I'm a woodworker after all. I find I don't use miter gauges less and less as time goes by. The support and safety of a sled is a better fit for me.
    Pic-1 (600 x 450).jpg
    The WP 90 degree thing is nothing I would ever consider, YMMV

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