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Thread: LagunaP12 vs. Felder K3

  1. #16
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    Feb 2004
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    Perth, Australia
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    Hi Aaron

    Harvey is the factory. They produce machines under their own name. They build machines for others as well. The also make all the Bridge City tools (which they own).

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  2. #17
    Join Date
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    That's a good point, Derek. The company marketing as Havey has been a long-time contract manufacturer who decided to sell some gear under their own name, two, awhile back, as well as buy the Bridge City brand and keep those things flowing to the marketplace. Part of their own-brand strategy also includes their innovative dust collection systems in addition to the more "typical" major tools and accessories.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    Want to add one more comment to this as I have not got the straightest of answer from Felder. They are telling me the scoring blade is a little thicker than the main blade. The issue I have with that is I run my 48" boards through to cut 3 pieces at 15". If the scoring blade is wider and say in alignment with the main blade on the right side, this means on the left side there is a hair difference. After the first piece cutout I have a square edge on both side, but the next piece on the right side, would it sort of look the scoring blade shelfed my board? They did say I can order the scoring blade the same size as the main blade Question.jpg

  4. #19
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    Jun 2022
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    My understanding is that there are two types of scoring blades. The first type is a single blade which is a conical or tapered blade. This means the width of the blade tooth is smaller at the tip than it is as the base. See the picture on this page here (difference between B3 and B4 width):
    https://www.scosarg.com/omas-scoring...-5-5-z-36-d-50

    It can be a pain because you need to use a digital caliper on the blade tooth and only raise the scoring blade up enough so that the blade cuts a width that matches the width of your main saw blade. The downside is that the scoring blade has to be centered with the main blade. The problem here is that not all saws allow side-to-side adjustment of your scoring blade which means the scoring blade is going to be a little bit off center.

    The second type is a stackable/adjustable scoring blade. It comes with two very thin scoring blades and a set of shims you can place in between to make the cut thicker to match the main saw blade. It almost looks like a micro-dado set. Example here:
    https://www.alibaba.com/product-deta...187554346.html

    Make sense?

  5. #20
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    On Canada
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    119
    My Hammer K3 does have the scoring option and uses the 2 thin blades and the required number of shims to match up with the main blade. It does also have side to side adjustment to center it up with the main blade. Super easy to do
    Once you have it set up Correctly both of the pieces that you cut will be the same .. just a good straight 90 deg edge
    Last edited by Robyn Horton; 08-09-2022 at 5:16 PM.

  6. #21
    @Aaron Inami - that makes sense. The first option sounds painful with a cut/adjust cycle. Thank you for the breakdown.

    @Robyn Horton - thank you for confirming. That at least allows me the control to align on center or adjust as needed.

    Want to thank everyone for their responses. I did pull the trigger on the K3 Hammer as availability was end of this month. I might have gone after the SCM if it was available sooner but as we approach October, busy season starts and wanted at least a quiet month to get up to speed on use and features.

  7. #22
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    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Mazey View Post
    Want to add one more comment to this as I have not got the straightest of answer from Felder. They are telling me the scoring blade is a little thicker than the main blade. The issue I have with that is I run my 48" boards through to cut 3 pieces at 15". If the scoring blade is wider and say in alignment with the main blade on the right side, this means on the left side there is a hair difference. After the first piece cutout I have a square edge on both side, but the next piece on the right side, would it sort of look the scoring blade shelfed my board? They did say I can order the scoring blade the same size as the main blade Question.jpg
    One must choose a scoring blade that matches the kerf width of the main blade or a scoring blade that is adjustable width. IMHO, they must be identical kerf for best results. I own a scoring blade that is an exact match for the Forest blades I use in the main position, for example.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Mazey View Post
    Want to add one more comment to this as I have not got the straightest of answer from Felder. They are telling me the scoring blade is a little thicker than the main blade. The issue I have with that is I run my 48" boards through to cut 3 pieces at 15". If the scoring blade is wider and say in alignment with the main blade on the right side, this means on the left side there is a hair difference. After the first piece cutout I have a square edge on both side, but the next piece on the right side, would it sort of look the scoring blade shelfed my board? They did say I can order the scoring blade the same size as the main blade Question.jpg
    Hi Joseph, We set the scoring saw blade 0.1mm wider than the main blade, and centered on the main blade. Buy the split scoring saw that’s adjusted by shims, do not buy the conical blade as the kerf varies with blade elevation.

    The scoring saw is only above the table when cutting melamine (typically), and is only high enough to cut the melamine. It does not result in boards with tapered edges, if you look at the cut with a magnifier you’ll see a rebate about 0.05mm in dimension.

    There, now you’re receiving an answer from Felder (Felder-Group Canada).��

    Regards, Rod

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2022
    Location
    Tracy, CA
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    It will be interesting to get your feedback on this K3 once you have it in place. This is the 80mm adjustable/stackable scoring blade you want for that machine:

    https://www.felder-group.com/en-us/shop/scoring-units-sc91901/adjustable-scoring-blade-sp91907

    I would recommend getting the outrigger table (if you haven't). It looks like the K3 79x48" is on sale right now. 20% off!

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Mazey View Post
    Want to add one more comment to this as I have not got the straightest of answer from Felder. They are telling me the scoring blade is a little thicker than the main blade. The issue I have with that is I run my 48" boards through to cut 3 pieces at 15". If the scoring blade is wider and say in alignment with the main blade on the right side, this means on the left side there is a hair difference. After the first piece cutout I have a square edge on both side, but the next piece on the right side, would it sort of look the scoring blade shelfed my board? They did say I can order the scoring blade the same size as the main blade Question.jpg
    you say "board" -- when I hear board, I think lumber stock. I'd never use scoring with lumber; rather, scoring is for laminates (like melamine and veneer faced sheet goods). The purpose of scoring is to pierce the chip susceptible laminate/veneer. A very slight difference in kerf width between the laminate and the substrate is usually not a problem...

    Mike

  11. #26
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    Mike, while I don't use scoring the majority of the time with solid stock, I have employed it occasionally for something that it was critical for me to get a very clean cut both top and bottom. It's less likely to have a zero clearance setup on a slider so having the option is nice. It's the same principle as with delicate sheet goods as you describe.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Mike, while I don't use scoring the majority of the time with solid stock, I have employed it occasionally for something that it was critical for me to get a very clean cut both top and bottom. It's less likely to have a zero clearance setup on a slider so having the option is nice. It's the same principle as with delicate sheet goods as you describe.
    That's interesting, I've never thought about using scoring for lumber. Then again, I don't think I've ever had an issue with chipping on the bottom of my lumber cuts, but that may be due to the sharpness of my blades and their cleanliness.

    That being said, I don't use scoring on my CF741. I recently bought the correct size of scoring blades, but the Felder requires using a smaller main blade on the 700 series saws when using scoring and I don't have a 250mm crosscut or ripping blade...

    Mike

  13. #28
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Yea, it's not something that might be immediately intuitive, but scoring capability can sometimes be a "problem solver" and I'm looking forward to the new slider I bought for the new shop which includes that feature. I have felt so constrained using a cabinet saw as well as all too often being in the "line of fire" when cutting, after having a slider for so many years and getting used to being off to the side.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #29
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    Location
    Toronto Ontario
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    That's interesting, I've never thought about using scoring for lumber. Then again, I don't think I've ever had an issue with chipping on the bottom of my lumber cuts, but that may be due to the sharpness of my blades and their cleanliness.

    That being said, I don't use scoring on my CF741. I recently bought the correct size of scoring blades, but the Felder requires using a smaller main blade on the 700 series saws when using scoring and I don't have a 250mm crosscut or ripping blade...

    Mike
    Hi Mike are you sure that you can’t run a scoring blade with a 315mm main blade?

    I don’t remember the 700 series having an issue with that…..Regards, Rod
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 08-13-2022 at 10:04 AM. Reason: fixed quote tagging

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