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Thread: RipSaw

  1. #1

    RipSaw

    Anyone have experience using a RipSaw portable bandsaw? One is available locally and it seems useful in milling logs. Any idea of a fair price for one in useable condition? Here's a YouTube video of one in use.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    It could be useful is milling pine. White oak or hickory would be a completely different story. I owned a Baker/Enercraft manual sawmill for 3 years. It had a 20 hp Honda engine on it. It did fine with all hardwoods. Plus I could stand up to use it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    They work fine in any wood as long as the saw motor is adequate for the task. I saw one recently advertised for $400 I think.

    John

  4. #4
    It seems like you still have to get that log flat and square to use that saw, no?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by John Kananis View Post
    It seems like you still have to get that log flat and square to use that saw, no?
    Yes I watched a video last night where a metal plate was fixed to the log for the machine to rest on for the initial cut. The flat on the log was used afterwards. The video also showed the machine rigged up to a rolling platform so it could be used like a traditional saw mill. I'm curious enough to go take a look at the machine.

  6. #6
    Here is the other video showing the Ripsaw in operation. The last part has the adaption to make it more operate like a stationary or standard mill.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Eastern TN
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    6DED25A5-788A-46C0-8361-67BFC0A59680_1_105_c.jpgI had one of those that I purchased used a number of years ago. As long as you are strong and physically fit they work pretty well for they are. but they require a lot of fairly heavy lifting and work. I have no idea of the value of one today. I gave mine to my son and he is using it to cut some cherry logs he has. He is in his 50's so more fit than I was when I was using it in my 60's. I milled about 5000 bd ft with mine over a period of time. Parts are probably no longer available and you need a fairly powerful saw to power it. Of course you need some machinery or ingenuity to move logs and slabs around. For the price at that time it worked for me. I still have some small slabs I milled with it in the mid-90's. Slowed down in the shop as my age went up.
    Last edited by Al Weber; 07-19-2022 at 4:06 PM. Reason: add photoi

  8. #8
    I picked up the Ripsaw mentioned earlier. Photos below. It's missing at least the guide beam and assemblies that secures it to the log. Anyone that knows where I might be able to purchase these or have advice on making them would be appreciated. The saw that came with it is a Stihl 38AV. I don't know the condition of it as there wasn't any fuel to try it out. Hopefully I can get it to run. It does seem to have good compression though.
    Ripsaw 001.jpgRipsaw 002.jpg

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
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    The beams that were in the original package were 2" x 4 or 5"d hollow aluminum. There were some end caps that locked onto the beam and were fastened with some big spikes into the log ends. I would just get some straight 2x 6s (if such a thing still exists) and figure out a way to fasten them to the log so you don't cut into a fastener on the first pass. You only need the beam for the first and second runs (I've done it with only one flattening cut on a straight log running the guide along the log itself for the second squaring cut. After that the log serves as a reference for the guide pad.

    That saw looks a bit worn. Hope you can get it running.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    The 38AV was a really good saw; lots of torque. It should do well on the Ripsaw if you can get it running. Like Al said, you can use any dimensional lumber that works as a beam to make the first cut. I use a piece of aluminum extension ladder with my Alaskan mill. I screw it into the log and just make sure I cut below the screws. With a 2 x 6, etc. you can screw into the log to anchor it and also to act as jacks/shims, where needed, to get the lumber flat and with no sag as the saw passes over it. If you've never cut lumber before you are about to get another lesson in hard work. Nothing better than turning a tree into a piece of furniture though.

    John

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    NE Iowa
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    The guide I use with my Alaska mill consists of two end supports easily made from 1/4" steel plate, as shown in the attached photo, two 10' lengths of 2" square steel tube, a box of 2 1/2" #9 construction screws, a 2' level, and a battery powered impact driver. Cut your log with reasonably square ends, and you can screw the end supports to each end, using the level to make sure they are co-planar to assure you start with no twist in your slabs. I put plenty of holes for screws in the end supports, but two screws per support is sufficient holding power. Once the end supports are set, just put the tubes in the notches. I secure the tubes with little wedges of wood, but if you're of a steel fabrication mind, you could easily attach set screws to the end supports to secure them. That's all there is to it. I find it much simple and more adaptable than the other things I've seen done - using aluminum ladders, or elaborate attachments. Takes just minutes to set up. Easily toted anywhere, since it's all in pieces. Only drawback is that, being steel, it's a bit heavy.

    PXL_20220721_013511290.jpg

  12. #12
    Finally got the Stihl 038AV running and put back onto the RipSaw. Looking for a log now to test it out. Slim pickings here in the high desert of Arizona.

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