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Thread: Parallel dust collectors

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    ...how hard is it to have a 240V single phase outlet in a workshop in the US?
    The range is very easy to very involved and comes down to where the breaker panel is physically located and how the circuit has to be routed to the space and final location. Sometimes that involves installing a sub-panel in the space to be used as a workshop so that only one "long" run is required and there is provision for adding additional circuits. In the US, a typical garage, for example only has one 120v circuit and very rarely has a "native" 240v circuit unless laundry equipment...specifically an electric clothes dryer...is located in the space. Some folks are lucky that the main panel is in the garage. For others, it might be clear at the other end of the residence and require difficult transit of wire between the panel and the space. Folks in that situation who have a basement or crawlspace are luckier than folks who have their home on a concrete slab. That's nearly universal in the southern areas of the US, for example while basements are more common farther north. The net of this is that installing a 240v circuit can be as simple as a few feet of 12 gage or 10 gage wire from an existing panel all the way to a major project that can cost thousands of dollars.

    I was lucky that in my current temporary gara-shop, the main panel was right there on the wall. It was nearly full and flush mounted, so I opted for a sub-panel next to it that was surface mounted. Wiring the shop from there was very easy. Even so, the cost of materials plus permit plus having a licensed electrician do the short interconnection to the main panel came to about $500.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #32
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    Jan 2016
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    Moving on to the implementation phase of my new dust collector setup - the roof renovation is done and I've got the motor and impeller mounted to the ceiling of the shop. However in my mind the outlet of the cyclone was going to be .... tight to the ceiling. I guess in reality that's impossible. So now I'm looking at my option for keeping my head room.

    I read a while back that having a straight shot into the cyclone is really important. However looking at peoples setups, seems like most have gentle turns and angles coming right out of the cyclone. If I were to add a 45 deg elbow to the output of the cyclone and route it up, would that be a problem? I know minimizing turns is best, but I also want to maintain headroom.

    Edit: I guess I should be more descriptive in what I'm thinking about doing.

    My original plan was to have ~8ft of straight 6in pipe go straight into my cyclone. Now I'm thinking about: Cyclone -> 30deg up -> 3ft of 6in pipe -> -30 deg (back to level) -> 5ft of pipe.

    I'm not sure I really have any options. Think I'll lose noticeable fpm volume with this setup? Should I rethink my plan?
    Last edited by Ben Grefe; 08-09-2022 at 2:14 AM.

  3. #33
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    "Ideal" is straight in. But that's not always practical or possible. Just keep things as gentle as possible...the 30ļ idea is sound in that respect. Depending on what kind of duct you are using, you might be able to make it even more gentle if space permits.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #34
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    In pursuit of ideal I ran into reality. I wanted as straight a shot as possible for the first few feet as recommended by many designers. I wanted the DC outside the shop and I wanted the pipe near the ceiling; that is I didn't want the pipe entering the shop 5' off the ground and gradually rising to 10'. I wrangled this combination of wants for some time.

    In the end I went for a gentle S curve to get the elevation I wanted prior to entering the shop. Not ideal but realistic in my world.
    New Shop (370).jpgNew Shop (373).jpgNew Shop (347).jpg
    Your 30 degree idea sounds great if you have the room for that run along a wall or out of a traffic path. In the end we all try for ideal and push as close to it as we can get
    "Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups." - George Carlin

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2022
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    Tracy, CA
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    Technically speaking, it is recommended to have 3-5 feet of straight pipe right on the entry to the dust collector. This is to reduce the turbulence in the airflow before it enters the cyclone so that the air movement is smooth. This increases the efficiency of separating the dust out of the air because you want the dust/air to naturally be pushed to the outside walls of the cyclone (like a centrifuge). If there is a lot of turbulence, it becomes a "storm" inside the cyclone instead of smooth dust/air movement (at least, that's my theory). However, like Jim stated, it's not always practical or possible to do this.

    Looking at your original picture:
    BenGrafeDust.jpg

    It looks like you do have a section of straight pipe, which is great. It's up to you if you want to do an elbow up right away. If you can live with it, I would recommend 3-5 feet straight out and then you can do a large radius elbow up. If you must do an elbow right out of the gate, do a 30 degree with the largest C.L.R you can get.

    The second thing I notice is your first drop to the big disc sander is almost a 90 T-branch (looks like 75 degree or so). This is not good because it introduces turbulence at the branch when the air is merged into the main (it's also not as smooth or efficient). It is recommended to use the most shallow angle you can for drops -- such as a 30 degree branch and then attach a 60 degree elbow. A a 45 degree branch is a compromise if you must, but it's still much better than your 75 degree.

  6. #36
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    Apr 2005
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    Central MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Inami;
    (NOTE: when referencing power in the US, the standard is to call it "115V" or "230V", but in reality, many people are getting somewhere between 120V and 125V actual in there houses - which translates to 240V or 250V actual when using both legs).
    This is absolutely wrong. ANSI standard residental single phase voltage is 240/120 volts +3%/-5% at the service point (typically the meter base) and has been for about 50 years now. Ive been in the utility industry for almost 35 years now and not one professional I've ever worked with has called it
    "115 volts". Additionally US standard 3 phase voltages are 480/277 or 208/120 grounded wye or 240 volt delta with or without a bastard leg.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 08-09-2022 at 4:03 PM. Reason: Fixed Quote Tagging

  7. #37
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    Jan 2016
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    Seattle, WA
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    Thanks for the great advice all.

    I did end up moving the impeller from the corner to middle of the garage door wall. With the new framing I’m confident it can support the weight, so this should shorten the runs to my most used tools (Table Saw, Jointer, Planer and CNC) AND cut out some weird flex tube connector I had.

    4DA62280-5C04-4F8F-B33D-6D2574C4D3A2.jpg

    I mocked up where the cyclone will end up (it needs to be movable for the rare times I open the door) and then I’d like to get the pipe nearly up to the height of the beam.

  8. #38
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    Making that movable should be, um..."fun"...I'm thinking you need a free-standing stand with casters and need to use quick connect ducting at least at the inlet to accomplish that!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2022
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    Tracy, CA
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    I agree. Trying to move that sounds like a big hassle and pain in the butt. Plus, you have that big filter in the middle of everything as well.

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