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Thread: MM20 Bandsaw

  1. #1

    MM20 Bandsaw

    Does anyone know of any bandsaw repair services/TECH that serve the Tampa Bay/Central Florida area?

    I live in Citrus County and am in need of getting some repair work done on my (2003) MiniMax MM20 bandsaw.

    Specifically, I removed the lower fly wheel to facilitate a repair to the foot break, (believe it or not) I can not get the flywheel back on because the tolerance between the hole in the wheel and the shaft it goes on are so tight.

    Thanks!

    Stu
    Stu

    Stu's Woodworks (URL in profile)
    Hernando, FL

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
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    3,046
    Did you replace the bearings? Did you replace the brake? If you got the wheel off, there should not be a bearing problem getting it back on. Suggesting that something you replaced is causing the problem.

  3. #3
    OP, can you post some pics of what you are seeing? The upper flywheel on Centauros does require a puller/driver to remove from the arbor shaft but AFAIR, the lower wheel simply slips back into place. Be aware that there is a small spacer ring that needs go onto the arbor shaft of the lower wheel before you slide it back into the frame or else it will wobble like crazy.

    Erik
    CFE7EC3F-3403-4F10-801F-4DF01679C88B.jpg
    Ex-SCM and Felder rep

  4. #4
    Richard,

    I did not replace anything. The initial problem was that the foot break was jammed in the down (i.e. braked/stopped position) and would not return/release. I simply removed the wheel, removed the foot pedal (which instantly released the brake), straighten the foot pedal (bent by movers), and now I can't get the wheel back-on. I have tried reasonable- persuasion with a 4 lb hammer and 2 x 4, but that didn't do anything.

    I am stumped...
    Stu

    Stu's Woodworks (URL in profile)
    Hernando, FL

  5. #5
    Stewart, if I am understanding correctly, you removed the lower wheel and the shaft as a assembly.

    I removed the same lower wheel on my MM16 (same vintage),to remove the wheel, two of the famous locating bolts on the right side of the machine must be loosened (the bolts without the paint) the shaft pulled straight out. To reassemble, the shaft just slide in, and the locating bolts retightened. Maybe one of the locating bolts you loosened is in the way of the shaft?
    Last edited by Robert LaPlaca; 07-04-2022 at 6:58 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
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    3,046
    Quote Originally Posted by Stewart Crick View Post
    Richard,

    I did not replace anything. The initial problem was that the foot break was jammed in the down (i.e. braked/stopped position) and would not return/release. I simply removed the wheel, removed the foot pedal (which instantly released the brake), straighten the foot pedal (bent by movers), and now I can't get the wheel back-on. I have tried reasonable- persuasion with a 4 lb hammer and 2 x 4, but that didn't do anything.

    I am stumped...
    When something just slides off, using a 4 pound hammer to drive it back on is not a prudent decision. Driving on items with bearings can cause brinelling of the balls in the bearing at a minimum, and destroy parts at the worst.

  7. #7
    I think Robert is onto something here: OP, any chance the arbor shaft is hitting the clock bolts in the rear hub as you try to slide it in? It makes no sense that you could remove the lower wheel by hand, then be unable to do the same in reverse order. If I was in front if the machine, we could probably figure this out in 30 seconds. Again, pics would really help.

    Erik

  8. #8
    I did fail to mention (in my effort to keep it simple) that it required a gear removal tool to get the flyhwheel off. I've been trying, as best I can to determine if there is something behind the wheel preventing it from going back on, and I can't find see anything obstructing it.

    To clarify Robert LaPlaca's summary, I did not remove the wheel and shaft as an assembly -- I removed the wheel from the shaft.
    Stu

    Stu's Woodworks (URL in profile)
    Hernando, FL

  9. #9
    Stewart, the shaft is a light press fit ( I think thats the right machinist term), which as you found out needs a gear puller to remove the flywheel from the shaft. To reinstall the shaft back on the wheel would require a press to install the shaft on the wheel.. There are other methods, that are less desirable using a BFH.

  10. #10
    I’ve never actually removed the arbor shaft from the lower wheel. Not that it matters now but that step is not necessary in order to access the footbrake. I agree with Robert: Best to take it to machine shop. Or, maybe coat the arbor shaft with some lightweight oil, stick it in a plastic bag, and leave it in the freezer overnight if you want to give it another shot yourself. Good luck.

    Erik
    Ex-SCM and Felder rep

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
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    964
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Loza View Post
    Or, maybe coat the arbor shaft with some lightweight oil, stick it in a plastic bag, and leave it in the freezer overnight if you want to give it another shot yourself. Good luck.
    Sounds like the shaft is still on the machine.

  12. #12
    Just wanted to give a epilogue to this situation for posterity sake.

    I received several suggestions, from multiple sources (i.e. woodnet, sawmill creek, Minimax Owners group, Louis Iturra, & SCM) that boiled down to:

    Various simple to complex process for cleaning the shaft & wheel with emory cloth -- I did clean the shaft & wheel opening, but didn't employ emory cloth
    Heat the wheel opening with a heat gun to expand the opening -- I was hesitant to try this, given that I had no knowledge of proper temperature, time duration, and when bearing damage might occur
    Cool the shaft with ice water/dry-ice to contract the shaft size -- seemed reasonable, but ultimately didn't have to do
    Use a gear press -- don't have one

    In the end, Sam Blasco (Minimax Owners Group) had the simplest, sailor-proof solution -- and it worked!!!! After cleaning the shaft/wheel opening, and apply an anti-seize coating to the shaft, I simply employed a series of longer retention bolts to "walk" the wheel back on to the shaft, until the stock (short) retention bolt engaged and secured the wheel in its proper shaft-location.

    The wheel is back in place, and the saw has been tested, tested satisfactorily!!!

    Thank you everyone for your suggestions and help.
    Stu

    Stu's Woodworks (URL in profile)
    Hernando, FL

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    61,377
    That's a good outcome, Stewart. I saw Sam's response and thought it was brilliant. Clearly, it was.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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