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Thread: How can I eliminate flex in door jamb?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Red Deer, Alberta
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    907
    Pull off the striker plate and see if you might be able to drill a hole (as big as you can) and then glue in a length of dowel flush to the back of the striker plate. Put the striker back on and it shouldn't be able to move at all.
    Funny, I don't remember being absent minded...

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    WNY
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    This is the function of the adjustable jamb screws I mentioned earlier. Nothing could be easier for this exact problem.

    John

  3. #18
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    Nov 2021
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    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    This is the function of the adjustable jamb screws I mentioned earlier. Nothing could be easier for this exact problem.

    John
    Here are the screws John is recommending in a more affordable quantity. I have it bookmarked for the future.

    U2 TOPSTAR SCREW 1/4 - 3/8 X 3-1/8 18 PCS (T00103125H)
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 07-06-2022 at 5:16 PM.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    State College, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Zeller View Post
    My advice would be to use fully threaded #10 wood screws so they screw into both the wood jamb and into the stud behind it. As long as the wood the jamb is made from is strong enough it will not be able to move.
    I took off the strike, drilled a 3" deep pilot hole with countersinking, and drove in a #9 fully-threaded wood screw, taking care not to pull the jamb toward the stud, and then replaced the strike. This worked very well.

    There were several attractive suggestions. The adjustable jamb screw were quite appealing, but rather expensive when accounting for the special driver and shipping. So I decided to try the cheap and for my purpose more or less equivalent method first.

    Thanks for the help!

  5. #20
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    Nov 2021
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    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    Good job! I hope it works well. The door looks like it is in a commercial or public space.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  6. #21
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    Jun 2012
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    New Westminster BC
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    How about adding an "occupied/unoccupied" sign to the door? Having a bathroom door that can be locked from inside and is as secure as Fort Knox, OK exaggeration, is not a good idea. But the point is how secure does a bathroom door need to be? Sometimes the solution is to realize what the problem really is. For most of us knowing the bathroom is occupied is all that's required, most of us (I hope) won't try to force the door open if we know the bathroom is occupied. Translation for my southern friends, bathroom is the same as restroom .

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    How about adding an "occupied/unoccupied" sign to the door? Having a bathroom door that can be locked from inside and is as secure as Fort Knox, OK exaggeration, is not a good idea. But the point is how secure does a bathroom door need to be? Sometimes the solution is to realize what the problem really is. For most of us knowing the bathroom is occupied is all that's required, most of us (I hope) won't try to force the door open if we know the bathroom is occupied. Translation for my southern friends, bathroom is the same as restroom .
    What bathroom do you speak of?

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    State College, PA
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    This is the back door to a homeless shelter. They bought the building in December 2021. I’m their volunteer handyman. Just trying to keep things patched up until major renovations, which probably won’t start until fall.

    https://www.outofthecoldcc.org/

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    New Westminster BC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myk Rian View Post
    What bathroom do you speak of?
    OOPs, somehow I got the impression it was a bathroom door, looking back at the original post and the OP's latest post I see I was mistaken. Classic example of why you shouldn't ass u me.
    And to Jay, good on you for volunteering. My wife and I, well her more than me, volunteer for a food bank. One of our clients today said thank you for keeping me alive, I couldn't afford my medications without the food you give me. Needless to say, we were all moved by her statement. I encourage all of you to give back if you can if for no other reason than it will make you feel good.

  10. #25
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    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    Sounds good. If it's still not quite as secure as you would like, I'd take the strike off, drill a hole large enough to get the end of anchor setting epoxy nozzle into the hole with a tight fit, and squeeze some of the epoxy behind the jamb. The screws you installed will keep the jamb from closing up, and will let the epoxy fill as much of the void as possible.

    You can find the anchor setting epoxy where the concrete is in box stores. Make sure you get the nozzle with the tube. The epoxy mixes in the nozzle, but that leaves the nozzle as a one use only.

    It's very thick, so will not do much sagging behind the jamb, but will greatly reinforce the two screws.

    I use it for many things other than its intended use.

  11. #26
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    Jul 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    anchor setting epoxy

    It's very thick, so will not do much sagging behind the jamb, but will greatly reinforce the two screws.
    Thanks! Im guessing that the high strength version would suffice, as opposed to the super strength.

  12. #27
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    Yes.......

  13. #28
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    Highland MI
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    Shims and long screws.
    NOW you tell me...

  14. #29
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    May 2021
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    Spartanburg South Carolina
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    I can remember in the early days of "Great Stuff" I watched a contractor foam all of the windows to make the house tight. You could not move any of the windows due to expansion. I think they make a non expanding version now too. If you use regular "a little dap will do ya"

  15. #30
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Clausen View Post
    I can remember in the early days of "Great Stuff" I watched a contractor foam all of the windows to make the house tight. You could not move any of the windows due to expansion. I think they make a non expanding version now too. If you use regular "a little dap will do ya"
    Yes, for doors and windows as well as any other "delicate" areas, the low expansion foam is essential. The regular stuff really has a lot of "power" to bend things as it expands.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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