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Thread: Dupont chain saver lube. My new dry lube

  1. #1
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    Dupont chain saver lube. My new dry lube

    I mentioned it in my jointer thread and thought I would post a new thread about Dupont Chain Saver spray lube. It goes on wet about like wd40 but in a few minutes it dries to a thin teflon wax film. It does not stay damp like other chain lubes that I have used. It claims to be self cleaning. it worked well on sliding surfaces and the adjusting screws.
    I do not reccomend it for drive gears under load since it is just wax not a pressure lube. Cost about $7.00 for a good size can from Amazon. No one seems to have it on their shelves.
    Bill D

    I could not find the product on the poorly organized Dupont website so maybe they sold the name to someone else?

    https://www.amazon.com/DuPont-Teflon...001B0VDC2?th=1

  2. #2
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    I use that product in lieu of the very expensive Blade Kote from Bostic. Works great.

  3. #3
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    AFAIK It has teflon not silicone so no finishing problems. I did not notice any smell. Drys fast when it is 95 in the shop.
    Bill D
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 06-29-2022 at 1:53 AM.

  4. #4
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    I recently bought this exact product as a lubricant for my Inkleind twin turbo vise. The cost was certainly right.
    While my application is for gears, I'm still thinking the choice is correct. My view is the gears hopefully have pressure in the range of a chain and sprocket. But we'll see if I can tell if there is any degradation.
    I did test it with some sawdust after it was dry and it didn't stick at all. So far so good!

  5. #5
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    Not sure if this is off-topic but I might try that on my bike chain. I usually use wax but always interested in exploring other options.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Funk View Post
    Not sure if this is off-topic but I might try that on my bike chain. I usually use wax but always interested in exploring other options.

    It is designed to be a chain lube so it should work fine.
    I think waxing the chain is a hold over of mis translating British English. In the early days British soaked their chains in paraffin to clean and lube them. Americans read that to mean wax. To the British Paraffin is what we in the USA call kerosene.
    Bill D
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 06-29-2022 at 1:57 AM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    It is designed to be a chain lube so it should work fine.
    I think waxing the chain is a hold over of mis translating British English. In the early days British soaked their chains in paraffin to clean and lube them. Americans read that to mean wax. To the British Paraffin is what we in the USA call kerosene.
    Bill D
    No they really do use block paraffin wax on chains. It doesnít last long but has lowest friction.

    The fastest bike lube isnít designed for your bike at all. In every measure, the most efficient chain lu- bricant is simple paraffin wax, sold in solid blocks at any hardware store. In the efficiency test it was faster than the best bike lube by 0.24 watts and the worst by 3.05 watts under ideal conditions. Follow- ing an hour covered in dirt, sand, and water, the paraffin was nearly 6 watts faster than the worst- performing lube. https://www.ceramicspeed.com/media/3...s-combined.pdf

    The information is a bit dated (from 2013) but cyclists are as crazy about chain lube as woodworkers are about sharpening.

  8. #8
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    The OP contains the words "chain lube" and the bike related contributions are helpful, especially the data. I never go fast but do like a chain lube that will last all day. It is also nice if it does not pick up gravel dust. I will give this a try it sounds a bit like like Pedro's Ice Wax or Slick Wax.
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 06-29-2022 at 8:26 AM.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  9. #9
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    I wonder how it would work on locks like for a car. They recommend no lube at all, or dry graphite.
    Years ago I read about. a British army study of tank tread lube in the desert. I think this was during or just after WW2. They found no lube at all lasted longest. Any kind of oil or grease just collected grit and wore things down faster. Of course this was before teflon but they had graphite and wax back then.
    Bill D
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 06-29-2022 at 5:03 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    The OP contains the words "chain lube" and the bike related contributions are helpful, especially the data. I never go fast but do like a chain lube that will last all day. It is also nice if it does not pick up gravel dust. I will give this a try it sounds a bit like like Pedro's Ice Wax or Slick Wax.
    Another benefit of wax is you won't get dirty if you need to touch the chain or transport your bike.

  11. #11
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    DuPont states that this product contains Fluoropolymers, which are a type of PFAS chemical. Iím sure this is a great lubricant, but please remember that PFAS is not something you want to get into your body. And since it is a forever chemical the long term buildup of these products is detrimental to our health and the environment.
    Reading up about bike chain lubricants, there are several bike chain lubricant makers who are actively working to eliminate PFAS type chemicals from their products. We woodworkers could start requesting the same from our vendors.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie Kopfer View Post
    DuPont states that this product contains Fluoropolymers, which are a type of PFAS chemical. I’m sure this is a great lubricant, but please remember that PFAS is not something you want to get into your body. And since it is a forever chemical the long term buildup of these products is detrimental to our health and the environment.
    Reading up about bike chain lubricants, there are several bike chain lubricant makers who are actively working to eliminate PFAS type chemicals from their products. We woodworkers could start requesting the same from our vendors.
    Yikes! Maybe not to try. Especially for anything you touch. I also try not to use sprays as much goes airborne.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  13. #13
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    Fluoropolymers, is the generic name for Teflon.
    Hydroflouric aicd is one of the worst things to get on your skin as it causes nerve damage so you do not feel the need for treatment
    Bill D
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 07-03-2022 at 1:22 AM.

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