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Thread: what kind of clear plastic to use in kitchen

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Katy, TX
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    718
    Like many of the others, I use cutting boards and trivets to protect the walnut countertops.
    Our kitchen has both walnut and granite, so many times it's just easiest to put the hot stuff directly on the granite countertops and simply avoid the walnut, but we also "recycled" random scraps of granite from the original install several years ago to make trivets for on the walnut... Many countertop installers are happy to give away their small scrap from other jobs too...
    Wooden feet with felt pads, bonded to the underside of any shape can be a complimentary look. They make nice cheese/Charcuterie boards too. example here is roughly 8"x12"...
    hotpad1.jpg

    PS. dull the edges of the broken granite by tapping with a small hammer (DAMHIKT )
    Last edited by Brad Schmid; 06-16-2022 at 3:32 PM.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
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    I have some questions for the group - are you in the habit of putting hot pots and pans on your countertops ?

    Who taught you or advocated doing this ?
    How long have you been doing it ?
    What type of top(s) do you have ?

    I know of few countertop materials that will handle this , even fewer that will survive and not have their appearance altered. Iím guessing most of you grew up with laminate tops and hot stuff on them is a definite no-no. Same with corian - if youíre a bit younger and more well to do.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Moscow, ID
    Posts
    287
    I have laminate countertops in my kitchen, so we can't put hot pans on them. I went and bought several 12" granite tiles that we use to put hot items on. We have one on either side of the stove plus a couple of others around the kitchen. My wife got a big wood cutting board (16" x 24") that she uses for prep, and we have other wood and plastic boards that we use as needed. The countertops still look pretty good after almost 20 years.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    8,469
    We have a granite counter top Ö



    When it comes to hot pots on the counter top, we use magnetic rubber ďGunstigĒ holder from Ikea Ö


    https://www.ikea.com/au/en/p/ikea-36...kaApJgEALw_wcB

    They are very effective in protecting the surface and disappear under the pot.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    561
    Sounds like a good excuse to make a nice, multi-species, end grain cutting board and keep in on the counter top.....

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whidbey Island, WA
    Posts
    181
    We regularly put boiling hot pans on our wood countertop which is finished with Osmo 3054. Much much better than mineral oil.
    Timberlight Designs

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,397
    Solid Surface cutting boards are an option for some people and are available in a variety of colors. Any shape or size and all you need is a router to make them yourself.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Make a Walnut cutting board with a colour/figure match as close as possible to the counter top. You really do not want to be cutting onto anything other than wood or hard plastic (and the latter is not a good match). If you cannot match the Walnut, then make an endgrain Walnut board. This is not to dominate the counter top, but seen as an accessory.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Actually, if memory serves me correctly, Using plastic as a cutting board is not a good idea. Evidently, once used, the cuts left when using a plastic cutting board will harbor bacteria more than the cuts left when using a wooden cutting board.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    8,469
    Rob, I looked up plastic, and you are correct. Safest boards are glass and granite, both non-porous. Most practical (and safe) is wood ... but watch the finishes.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    61,275
    In the home we have the option to use wood or plastic for cutting boards that meat, etc., goes on. Commercial kitchens don't have that ability due to cleaning/disinfection rules that aren't friendly to wood boards. Personally, I do use "plastic" for cutting meats and they can go in the dishwasher. Everything else...end-grain wood makes me happy.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
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    7,034
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    I have some questions for the group - are you in the habit of putting hot pots and pans on your countertops ?

    Who taught you or advocated doing this ?
    How long have you been doing it ?
    What type of top(s) do you have ?

    I know of few countertop materials that will handle this , even fewer that will survive and not have their appearance altered. I’m guessing most of you grew up with laminate tops and hot stuff on them is a definite no-no. Same with corian - if you’re a bit younger and more well to do.
    I've seen pictures of solid surface counter tops with stone tiles let into them. The stone is just higher than the counter top -maybe 1/16" or so. There's your place for hot pots. Wood moves and stone doesn't so there'd be some creativity required.
    As far as needing to be well-to-do for solid surface, maybe not. Still more than laminate probably but it'll last a lifetime or until you get tired of it. The stuff is not tricky to work I don't think. DuPont has some fabrication info at: https://www.corian.com/-documentatio...icalliterature. I'd imagine other solid surface materials are similar. Sorry for the hijack.

  12. #27
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    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
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    1,203
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Harms View Post
    I've seen pictures of solid surface counter tops with stone tiles let into them. The stone is just higher than the counter top -maybe 1/16" or so. There's your place for hot pots. Wood moves and stone doesn't so there'd be some creativity required.
    As far as needing to be well-to-do for solid surface, maybe not. Still more than laminate probably but it'll last a lifetime or until you get tired of it. The stuff is not tricky to work I don't think. DuPont has some fabrication info at: https://www.corian.com/-documentatio...icalliterature. I'd imagine other solid surface materials are similar. Sorry for the hijack.
    Wasn’t really very clear - my working theory is that the older crowd here was not taught to cut on or put hot pots directly on their countertops growing up in the 50’s -60-70’s- 80’s . The vast majority of those were laminate. When corian first came out , you were “well off” if you got that for your kitchen tops - and you were instructed not to put hot pots on that either.

  13. #28
    Do not use a glass cutting board. This will ruin the edges on your knives. I canít understand initially who said this was a good idea for a *cutting* board and why it would persist.

    The obvious solution to me seems to be to make a matching walnut cutting board the size you need and put it away if you really donít want to see it when not in use.

    Use trivets for hot pots and pans. Again, not sure who initially started saying this was something you should do, even in granite, etc but seems like a no brainer to use trivets that isolate the hot pots and pans.
    Still waters run deep.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
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    14,397
    Solid surface material is not a soft plastic which would not be an acceptable material for a cutting board.
    I have made hundreds of Corian cutting boards and not had one complaint, in fact people enjoy using them and they are dishwasher safe.
    Bacteria is not a concern.
    You can purchase small pieces of solid surface material on the Internet at very affordable prices.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
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    1,203
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Outten View Post
    Solid surface material is not a soft plastic which would not be an acceptable material for a cutting board.
    I have made hundreds of Corian cutting boards and not had one complaint, in fact people enjoy using them and they are dishwasher safe.
    Bacteria is not a concern.
    You can purchase small pieces of solid surface material on the Internet at very affordable prices.
    How about doing a test for us ?

    Take your best, sharpest chisels and run their edges along a piece of corian you have lying about. Make a few chops with them for good measure too.

    Then take them to a piece of wood for a test drive and report back to us. Please be very careful though.

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