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Thread: How To: Help to Put together an Oneida-Air Cyclone ?

  1. #1
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    Mar 2003
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    Greenfield, Indiana
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    How To: Help to Put together an Oneida-Air Cyclone ?

    I need to put together an Oneida-Air 5HP cyclone. The motor at the top of the cyclone needs to go between the 1st floor joists when installed in the basement. How in the world have you that have done this, lifted that beast on to the top of the cyclone funnel?

    Thank you,
    Bruce

  2. #2
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    Feb 2009
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    Cedar Park, TX - Boulder Creek, CA
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    Assemble it on the ground and tip it up?

    I made a wall mount bracket for my 3hp, so it wasn't as high a lift. And then assembled the rest, housing, impeller, etc., underneath it. I did it by myself and I ain't all that big or strong. Just dumb enough to suffer thru it. The cone was the worst. Don't remember if I held it up in place with a floor jack and 4x4 to get the band on, or what. Took it all back down not too long ago, don't remember how I did that either ;-)

  3. #3
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    Wes, That probably would work if the stand that came with the cyclone were stouter. I'm afraid the stand would bend doing it that way. Guess I could use some 2x4s to support the stand?

    You must be much stronger than I am. The motor alone is around 125 pounds. I don't know what the cyclone weight is that the motor sits on top of, but I had a hard time just moving the assembly. I can't imagine tilting it up by myself.

    Thank you for the tip.

  4. #4
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    I had to do as you describe in my previous shop; motor up between the rafters in my case. Without any overhead room I had to lift from below with a Genie Lift. Many rental yards carry them in various configurations.

    Genie-lift.jpg

    Sorry, no pictures of it in action. I had to use it and get it back before closing ;-) See link above or Google 'Genie Lift' for variations. It took a think or two but I was able to mount the blower first and then build the balance of the cyclone from below.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 06-13-2022 at 5:05 PM.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  5. #5
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    Glenn, I appreciate the tip. A rental place near me has a Genie lift. They rent one that goes up to 24' high, but it is 7' or so in the low position. I wondered if it would lift high enough with the mast not going up any father than the joist. Your experience answers that question.

    Thank you.

  6. #6
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    The one I rented was 12" from the top of the mast in the highest position. This was about right for my blower. I cobbled a frame of 2x4 scrap together that I clamped to the forks. This held the blower at a height that worked for me. The Genie Lift hand-cranks up and self locks in position so getting to just the right spot was pretty straight forward. Hope it works out for you.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Tampa Bay, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Walton View Post
    Wes, That probably would work if the stand that came with the cyclone were stouter. I'm afraid the stand would bend doing it that way. Guess I could use some 2x4s to support the stand?

    You must be much stronger than I am. The motor alone is around 125 pounds. I don't know what the cyclone weight is that the motor sits on top of, but I had a hard time just moving the assembly. I can't imagine tilting it up by myself.

    Thank you for the tip.
    I tipped it up attached to the stand without any trouble, but definitely with 2 people. With the cross braces on the stand, it seemed plenty stout enough.
    - “It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.” – Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    NW Indiana
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    I assembled my 5 hp Oneida on the ground and tipped it up with an engine lift and a block and tackle from up in the joists. It was a beast to get upright. But, I love it.

  9. #9
    I installed a 5hp Dust Gorilla Pro recently. My installation was in a closet with the cyclone mounted to a wall bracket. I installed the wall bracket, cyclone, and scroll housing on top of the cyclone by myself. I put a platform (2x4 frame with 3/4” OSB floor) in the closet as high as possible ( 38” maybe). I was able to slide motor and impeller onto the platform from an hydraulic lift cart. I enlisted a neighbor to help lift the motor from the plarform to the top of the scroll housing. I wanted the lifting to be about waist high. I might have been able to to lift it by myself but with two people it was easy. I wish the motor was 3-phase and thus lighter and the VFD handled both variable speed and single phase to three phase conversion.

    There are lots of ways to build a sturdy platform around the cyclone so that the lift is in two stages. Every installation is different but if you want to see my version, I probably have pictures somewhere. Good luck. It is a great dust collector.
    Last edited by Thomas Wilson; 06-13-2022 at 8:06 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    My 2hp cyclone I installed the drum etc to the wall. Then I attached a pulley to the rafters above the center of the drum. Used some rope over the pulley to hoist the motor/fan up. That was a hard pull. I should have used block and tackle but no headroom for all that rigging.
    Now I would get it up on my lift table and push it up from the bottom. With some ropes to prevent tipping. A transmission jack and blocking(milk crates) might work.
    Bill D

  11. #11
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    Similar situation with me, but there was no room to assemble it on it's side and then tip it up. My daughter (doesn't look like it, but she's strong as a freakin' horse) and I just lifted it up in place. The worst part was the tight quarters. I'm not hoping that I'll have to take it apart anytime soon

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    Crozet, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Frank View Post
    I assembled my 5 hp Oneida on the ground and tipped it up with an engine lift and a block and tackle from up in the joists. It was a beast to get upright. But, I love it.
    I did something similar utilizing a chain hoist. The hoist supported enough of the weight to allow me to tip it into place without assistance. If you have another person to help, all the better.
    There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” - Dave Barry

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